• OJ287 is a quasi-periodic quasar with roughly 12 year optical cycles. It displays prominent outbursts which are predictable in a binary black hole model. The model predicted a major optical outburst in December 2015. We found that the outburst did occur within the expected time range, peaking on 2015 December 5 at magnitude 12.9 in the optical R-band. Based on Swift/XRT satellite measurements and optical polarization data, we find that it included a major thermal component. Its timing provides an accurate estimate for the spin of the primary black hole, chi = 0.313 +- 0.01. The present outburst also confirms the established general relativistic properties of the system such as the loss of orbital energy to gravitational radiation at the 2 % accuracy level and it opens up the possibility of testing the black hole no-hair theorem with a 10 % accuracy during the present decade.
  • We present a study of local post-starburst galaxies (PSGs) using the photometric and spectroscopic observations from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and the results from the Galaxy Zoo project. We find that the majority of our local PSG population have neither early- nor late- type morphologies but occupy a well-defined space within the colour-stellar mass diagram, most notably, the low-mass end of the "green valley" below the transition mass thought to be the mass division between low-mass star-forming galaxies and high-mass passively-evolving bulge-dominated galaxies. Our analysis suggests that it is likely that a local PSG will quickly transform into "red", low-mass early-type galaxies as the stellar morphologies of the "green" PSGs largely resemble that of the early-type galaxies within the same mass range. We propose that the current population of PSGs represents a population of galaxies which is rapidly transitioning between the star-forming and the passively-evolving phases. Subsequently, these PSGs will contribute towards the build-up of the low-mass end of the "red sequence" once the current population of young stars fade and stars are no longer being formed. These results are consistent with the idea of "downsizing" where the build-up of smaller galaxies occurs at later epochs.
  • We present high- and intermediate resolution radio observations of the central region in the spiral galaxy IC 2497, performed using the European VLBI Network (EVN) at 18 cm, and the Multi-Element Radio Linked Interferometer Network (MERLIN) at 18 cm and 6 cm. We detect two compact radio sources, with brightness temperatures above 10e5 K, suggesting that they are related to AGN activity. We show that the total 18 cm radio emission from the galaxy is dominated neither by these compact sources nor large-scale emission, but extended emission confined within a sub-kpc central region. IC 2497 therefore appears as a typical luminous infrared galaxy that exhibits a nuclear starburst with a massive star formation rate (M > 5M_solar) of 12.4 M_solar/yr. These results are in line with the hypothesis that the ionisation nebula "Hanny's Voorwerp" at a distance of approx. 15-25 kpc from the galaxy is ionised by the radiation cone of the AGN.
  • (Abridged) OJ287 is a BL Lac object that has shown double-peaked bursts at regular intervals of ~12 yr during the last ~40 yr. We analyse optical photopolarimetric monitoring data from 2005-2009, during which the latest double-peaked outburst occurred. The aim of this study is twofold: firstly, we aim to analyse variability patterns and statistical properties of the optical polarization light-curve. We find a strong preferred position angle in optical polarization. The preferred position angle can be explained by separating the jet emission into two components: an optical polarization core and chaotic jet emission. The optical polarization core is stable on time scales of years and can be explained as emission from an underlying quiescent jet component. The chaotic jet emission sometimes exhibits a circular movement in the Stokes plane. We interpret these events as a shock front moving forwards and backwards in the jet, swiping through a helical magnetic field. Secondly, we use our data to assess different binary black hole models proposed to explain the regularly appearing double-peaked bursts in OJ287. We compose a list of requirements a model has to fulfil. The list includes not only characteristics of the light-curve but also other properties of OJ287, such as the black hole mass and restrictions on accretion flow properties. We rate all existing models using this list and conclude that none of the models is able to explain all observations. We discuss possible new explanations and propose a new approach to understanding OJ287. We suggest that both the double-peaked bursts and the evolution of the optical polarization position angle could be explained as a sign of resonant accretion of magnetic field lines, a 'magnetic breathing' of the disc.
  • We present multi-wavelength radio observations in the direction of the spiral galaxy IC 2497 and the neighbouring emission nebula known as "Hanny's Voorwerp". Our WSRT continuum observations at 1.4 GHz and 4.9 GHz, reveal the presence of extended emission at the position of the nebulosity, although the bulk of the emission remains unresolved at the centre of the galaxy. e-VLBI 1.65 GHz observations show that on the milliarcsecond-scale a faint central compact source is present in IC 2497 with a brightness temperature in excess of 4E5 K. With the WSRT, we detect a large reservoir of neutral hydrogen in the proximity of IC 2497. One cloud complex with a total mass of 5.6E9 Msol to the South of IC 2497, encompasses Hanny's Voorwerp. Another cloud complex is located at the position of a small galaxy group ~100 kpc to the West of IC 2497 with a mass of 2.9E9 Msol. Our data hint at a physical connection between both complexes. We also detect HI in absorption against the central continuum source of IC 2497. Our observations strongly support the hypothesis that Hanny's Voorwerp is being ionised by an AGN in the centre of IC 2497. In this scenario, a plasma jet associated with the AGN, clears a path through the ISM/IGM in the direction towards the nebulosity. The large-scale radio continuum emission possibly originates from the interaction between this jet and the large cloud complex that Hanny's Voorwerp is embedded in. The HI kinematics do not fit regular rotation, thus the cloud complex around IC 2497 is probably of tidal origin. From the HI absorption against the central source, we derive a lower limit of 2.8E21 +- 0.4E21 atoms/sqcm to the HI column density. However, assuming non-standard conditions for the detected gas, we cannot exclude the possibility that the AGN in the centre of IC 2497 is Compton-thick.
  • We present an analysis of an occulting galaxy pair, serendipitously discovered in ACS Nearby Galaxy Survey Treasury (ANGST) observations of NGC 253 taken with Hubble Space Telescope's Advanced Camera for Survey in F475W, F606W$ and F814W (SDSS-g, broad V and I). The foreground disk system (at z < 0.06) shows a dusty disk much more extended than the starlight, with spiral lanes seen in extinction out to 1.5 R\_25, approximately six half-light radii. This pair is the first where extinction can be mapped reliably out to this distance from the center. The spiral arms of the extended dust disk show typical extinction values of A\_F475W ~ 0.25, A\_F606W ~ 0.25, and A\_F814W ~ 0.15. The extinction law inferred from these measures is similar to the local Milky Way one, and we show that the smoothing effects of sampling at limited spatial resolution (<57 pc, in these data) flattens the observed function through mixing of regions with different extinction. This galaxy illustrates the diversity of dust distributions in spirals, and the limitations of adopting a single dust model for optically similar galaxies. The ideal geometry of this pair of overlapping galaxies and the high sampling of HST data make this dataset ideal to analyze this pair with three separate approaches to overlapping galaxies: (A) a combined fit, rotating copies of both galaxies, (B) a simple flip of the background image and (C) an estimate of the original fluxes for the individual galaxies based on reconstructions of their proper isophotes. We conclude that in the case of high quality data such as these, isophotal models are to be preferred.
  • The opacity of a spiral disk due to dust absorption influences every measurement we make of it in the UV and optical. Two separate techniques directly measure the total absorption by dust in the disk: calibrated distant galaxy counts and overlapping galaxy pairs. The main results from both so far are a semi-transparent disk with more opaque arms, and a relation between surface brightness and disk opacity. In the Spitzer era, SED models of spiral disks add a new perspective on the role of dust in spiral disks. Combined with the overall opacity from galaxy counts, they yield a typical optical depth of the dusty ISM clouds: 0.4 that implies a size of $\sim$ 60 pc. Work on galaxy counts is currently ongoing on the ACS fields of M51, M101 and M81. Occulting galaxies offer the possibility of probing the history of disk opacity from higher redshift pairs. Evolution in disk opacity could influence distance measurements (SN1a, Tully-Fisher relation). Here, we present first results from spectroscopically selected occulting pairs in the SDSS. The redshift range for this sample is limited, but does offer a first insight into disk opacity evolution as well as a reference for higher redshift measurements. Spiral disk opacity has not undergone significant evolution since z=0.2. HST imaging would help disentangle the effects of spiral arms in these pairs. Many more mixed-morphology types are being identified in SDSS by the GalaxyZoo project. The occulting galaxy technique can be pushed to a redshift of 1 using many pairs identified in the imaging campaigns with HST (DEEP2, GEMS, GOODS, COSMOS).
  • The opacity of a spiral disk due to dust absorption influences every measurement we make of it in the UV and optical. Two separate techniques directly measure the total absorption by dust in the disk: calibrated distant galaxy counts and overlapping galaxy pairs. The main results from both so far are a semi-transparent disk with more opaque arms, and a relation between surface brightness and disk opacity. In the Spitzer era, SED models of spiral disks add a new perspective on the role of dust in spiral disks. Combined with the overall opacity from galaxy counts, they yield a typical optical depth of the dusty ISM clouds: 0.4 that implies a size of ~60 pc. Work on galaxy counts is currently ongoing on the ACS fields of M51, M101 and M81. Occulting galaxies offer the possibility of probing the history of disk opacity from higher redshift pairs. Evolution in disk opacity could influence distance measurements (SN1a, Tully-Fisher relation). Here, we present first results from spectroscopically selected occulting pairs in the SDSS. The redshift range for this sample is limited, but does offer a first insight into disk opacity evolution as well as a reference for higher redshift measurements.
  • The Hubble Ultra Deep Field (HUDF) contains a significant number of B, V and i'-band dropout objects, many of which were recently confirmed to be young star-forming galaxies at z~4-6. These galaxies are too faint individually to accurately measure their radial surface brightness profiles. Their average light profiles are potentially of great interest, since they may contain clues to the time since the onset of significant galaxy assembly. We separately co-add V, i' and z'-band HUDF images of sets of z~4,5 and 6 objects, pre-selected to have nearly identical compact sizes and the roundest shapes. From these stacked images, we are able to study the averaged radial structure of these objects at much higher signal-to-noise ratio than possible for an individual faint object. Here we explore the reliability and usefulness of a stacking technique of compact objects at z~4-6 in the HUDF. Our results are: (1) image stacking provides reliable and reproducible average surface brightness profiles; (2) the shape of the average surface brightness profiles show that even the faintest z~4-6 objects are resolved; and (3) if late-type galaxies dominate the population of galaxies at z~4-6, as previous HST studies have shown, then limits to dynamical age estimates for these galaxies from their profile shapes are comparable with the SED ages obtained from the broadband colors. We also present accurate measurements of the sky-background in the HUDF and its associated 1-sigma uncertainties.
  • A spiral galaxy partially ovelapping a more distant elliptical offers an unique opportunity to measure the dust extinction in the foreground spiral. From the Sloan Digital Sky Survey DR4 spectroscopic sample, we selected 83 occulting galaxy pairs and measured disk opacity over the redshift range z = 0.0-0.2 with the goal to determine the recent evolution of disk dust opacity. The enrichment of the ISM changes over the lifetime of a disk and it is reasonable to expect the dust extinction properties of spiral disks as a whole to change over their lifetime. When they do, the change will affect our measurements of galaxies over the observable universe. From the SDSS pairs we conclude that spiral disks show evidence of extinction to ~2 effective radii. However, no evidence for recent evolution of disk opacity is evident, due to the limited redshift range and our inability to distinguish other factors on disk opacity such as the presence of spiral arms and Hubble type. Such effects also mask any relation between surface brightness and optical depth that has been found in nearby galaxies. Hence, we conclude that the SDSS spectral catalog is an excellent way to find occulting pairs and construct a uniform local sample. However, higher resolution than the SDSS images is needed to disentangle the effects of spiral arms and Hubble type from evolution since z = 0.2.
  • We present a deep ISO observation at 6.7 microns of the 53W002 group of galaxies and AGN at z=2.4. This approximately samples the emitted K band. The faint, blue star-forming objects are not detected, as expected from their very blue color across the emitted optical and UV. However, 53W002 itself is detected at the 3-sigma level, with an emitted V-K color appropriate for a population formed starting at z=3.6-7.0 with most likely value z=4.7. This fits with shorter-wavelength data suggesting that the more massive members of this group, which may all host AGN, began star formation earlier in deeper potential wells than the compact Lyman-alpha emission objects. Two foreground galaxies are detected, as well as several stars. One additional 6.7-micron source closely coincides with an optically faint galaxy, potentially at z=2-3. The overall source counts are consistent with other ISO deep fields.
  • I present two-band HST STIS imaging, and WIYN spectral mapping, of ongoing mass transfer in the interacting galaxy pair NGC 1409/10 (where NGC 1410 is the Seyfert galaxy also catalogued as III Zw 55). Archival snapshot WFPC2 imaging from the survey by Malkan et al. showed a dust feature stretching between the galaxies, apparently being captured by NGC 1409. The new images allow estimates of the mass being transferred and rate of transfer. An absorption lane typically 0.25" (100 pc) wide with a representative optical depth tau_B = 0.2 cuts across the spiral structure of NGC 1410, crosses the 7-kpc projected space between the nuclei, wraps in front of and, at the limits of detection, behind NGC 1409, and becomes a denser (tau_B = 0.4) polar feature around the core of NGC 1409. Combination of extinction data in two passbands allows a crude three-dimensional recovery of the dust structure, supporting the front/back geometry derived from colors and extinction estimates. The whole feature contains of order $10^6$ solar masses in dust, implying about 2x10^7 solar masses of gas, requiring a mass transfer rate averaging ~1 solar mass per year unless we are particularly unlucky in viewing angle. Curiously, this demonstrable case of mass transfer seems to be independent of the occurrence of a Seyfert nucleus, since the Seyfert galaxy in this pair is the donor of the material. Likewise, the recipient shows no signs of recent star formation from incoming gas, although NGC 1410 has numerous luminous young star clusters and widespread H-alpha emission.
  • Radio observations were used to detect the `active' galaxy population within rich clusters of galaxies in a non-biased manner that is not plagued by dust extinction or the K-correction. We present wide-field radio, optical (imaging and spectroscopy), and ROSAT All-Sky Survey (RASS) X-ray data for a sample of 30 very rich Abell (R > 2) cluster with z < 0.25. The VLA radio data samples the ultra-faint radio (L(1.4 GHz) > 2E22 W/Hz) galaxy population within these extremely rich clusters for galaxies with M_R < -21. This is the largest sample of low luminosity 20 cm radio galaxies within rich Abell clusters collected to date. The radio-selected galaxy sample represents the starburst (Star formation rate > 5 M_sun/yr) and active galactic nuclei (AGN) populations contained within each cluster. Archival and newly acquired redshifts were used to verify cluster membership for most (~95%) of the optical identifications. Thus we can identify all the starbursting galaxies within these clusters, regardless of the level of dust obscuration that would affect these galaxies being identified from their optical signature. Cluster sample selection, observations, and data reduction techniques for all wavelengths are discussed.
  • The optical light curve of the energetic gamma-ray burst GRB 991216 is consistent with jet-like behavior in which a power-law decay steepens from t**(-1.22 +/- 0.04) at early times to t**(-1.53 +/- 0.05) in a gradual transition at around 2 d. The derivation of the late-time decay slope takes into account the constant contribution of a host or intervening galaxy which was measured 110 d after the event at R = 24.56 +/- 0.14, although the light curve deviates from a single power law whether or not a constant term is included. The early-time spectral energy distribution of the afterglow can be described as F_nu ~ nu**(-0.74 +/- 0.05) or flatter between optical and X-ray, which, together with the slow initial decay, is characteristic of standard adiabatic evolution in a uniformly dense medium. Assuming that a reported absorption-line redshift of 1.02 is correct, the apparent isotropic energy of 6.7 x 10**53 erg is reduced by a factor of ~ 200 in the jet model, and the initial half-opening angle is ~ 6 deg. GRB 991216 is the third good example of a jet-like afterglow (following GRB 990123 and GRB 990510), supporting a trend in which the apparently most energetic gamma-ray events have the narrowest collimation and a uniform ISM environment. This, plus the absence of evidence for supernovae associated with jet-like afterglows, suggests that these events may originate from a progenitor in which angular momentum plays an important role but a massive stellar envelope or wind does not, e.g., the coalescence of a compact binary.
  • A detailed study of the mixed-morphology galaxy pair CPG 29 (Arp 119, VV 347) shows spectacular spectroscopic peculiarities in the southern (spiral) component (Mkn 984) including a spatially resolved region, roughly aligned along the minor axis of the galaxy, with multiple emission-line components redshifted by as much as 1300 km s$^{-1}$ with respect to the LINER nucleus. Strong [OI]\l6300 and [SII]\l\l6716,6731 emission suggest shock ionization. The rest of the galaxy's disk is spectroscopically undistinguished, with emission lines characteristic of disk H II regions and, in large part, ordered rotation. We discuss the following four possible explanations for the morphological and spectroscopic peculiarities in the spiral: (1) a super--wind scenario, supported by the high FIR luminosity of the spiral, and by emission line activity similar to that observed in FIR strong galaxies; (2) motion of the spiral through a hot, relatively dense intergalactic medium, possibly associated with the elliptical, that could affect the star formation rate and create a brightened disk rim; (3) a faint companion in direct collision with the disk, at $\Delta v_r \sim 1000$ \kms, that would straightforwardly explain the existence of the different redshift systems; (4) a pole on collision by the elliptical, that could produce the disturbed morphology and other properties of the spiral. The elliptical/spiral pole--on collision explains the high velocity line emitting regions as tidally stripped gas, and accounts for the presence of gas ionized by moterate velocity shocks. The morphology of Mrk 984 is consistent