• The XXL survey currently covers two 25 sq. deg. patches with XMM observations of ~10ks. We summarise the scientific results associated with the first release of the XXL data set, that occurred mid 2016. We review several arguments for increasing the survey depth to 40 ks during the next decade of XMM operations. X-ray (z<2) cluster, (z<4) AGN and cosmic background survey science will then benefit from an extraordinary data reservoir. This, combined with deep multi-$\lambda$ observations, will lead to solid standalone cosmological constraints and provide a wealth of information on the formation and evolution of AGN, clusters and the X-ray background. In particular, it will offer a unique opportunity to pinpoint the z>1 cluster density. It will eventually constitute a reference study and an ideal calibration field for the upcoming eROSITA and Euclid missions.
  • M87, the active galaxy at the center of the Virgo cluster, is ideal for studying the interaction of a supermassive black hole (SMBH) with a hot, gas-rich environment. A deep Chandra observation of M87 exhibits an approximately circular shock front (13 kpc radius, in projection) driven by the expansion of the central cavity (filled by the SMBH with relativistic radio-emitting plasma) with projected radius $\sim$1.9 kpc. We combine constraints from X-ray and radio observations of M87 with a shock model to derive the properties of the outburst that created the 13 kpc shock. Principal constraints for the model are 1) the measured Mach number ($M$$\sim$1.2), 2) the radius of the 13 kpc shock, and 3) the observed size of the central cavity/bubble (the radio-bright cocoon) that serves as the piston to drive the shock. We find an outburst of $\sim$5$\times$$10^{57}$ ergs that began about 12 Myr ago and lasted $\sim$2 Myr matches all the constraints. In this model, $\sim$22% of the energy is carried by the shock as it expands. The remaining $\sim$80% of the outburst energy is available to heat the core gas. More than half the total outburst energy initially goes into the enthalpy of the central bubble, the radio cocoon. As the buoyant bubble rises, much of its energy is transferred to the ambient thermal gas. For an outburst repetition rate of about 12 Myrs (the age of the outburst), 80% of the outburst energy is sufficient to balance the radiative cooling.
  • The HST Frontier Fields cluster MACS J1149.6+2223 is one of the most complex merging clusters, believed to consist of four dark matter halos. We present results from deep (365 ks) Chandra observations of the cluster, which reveal the most distant cold front (z=0.544) discovered to date. In the cluster outskirts, we also detect hints of a surface brightness edge that could be the bow shock preceding the cold front. The substructure analysis of the cluster identified several components with large relative radial velocities, thus indicating that at least some collisions occur almost along the line of sight. The inclination of the mergers with respect to the plane of the sky poses significant observational challenges at X-ray wavelengths. MACS J1149.6+2223 possibly hosts a steep-spectrum radio halo. If the steepness of the radio halo is confirmed, then the radio spectrum, combined with the relatively regular ICM morphology, could indicate that MACS J1149.6+2223 is an old merging cluster.
  • We present VIMOS-VLT spectroscopy of the Frontier Fields cluster MACS~J0416.1-2403 (z=0.397). Taken as part of the CLASH-VLT survey, the large spectroscopic campaign provided more than 4000 reliable redshifts, including ~800 cluster member galaxies. The unprecedented sample of cluster members at this redshift allows us to perform a highly detailed dynamical and structural analysis of the cluster out to ~2.2$r_{200}$ (~4Mpc). Our analysis of substructures reveals a complex system composed of a main massive cluster ($M_{200}$~0.9$\times 10^{15} M_{\odot}$) presenting two major features: i) a bimodal velocity distribution, showing two central peaks separated by $\Delta V_{rf}$~1100 km s$^{-1}$ with comparable galaxy content and velocity dispersion, ii) a projected elongation of the main substructures along the NE-SW direction, with a prominent subclump ~600 kpc SW of the center and an isolated BCG approximately halfway between the center and the SW clump. We also detect a low mass structure at z~0.390, ~10' S of the cluster center, projected at ~3Mpc, with a relative line-of-sight velocity of $\Delta V_{rf}$~-1700 km s$^{-1}$. The cluster mass profile that we obtain through our dynamical analysis deviates significantly from the "universal" NFW, being best fit by a Softened Isothermal Sphere model instead. The mass profile measured from the galaxy dynamics is found to be in relatively good agreement with those obtained from strong and weak lensing, as well as with that from the X-rays, despite the clearly unrelaxed nature of the cluster. Our results reveal overall a complex dynamical state of this massive cluster and support the hypothesis that the two main subclusters are being observed in a pre-collisional phase, in line with recent findings from radio and deep X-ray data. With this article we also release the entire redshift catalog of 4386 sources in the field of this cluster.
  • Merging galaxy clusters leave long-lasting signatures on the baryonic and non-baryonic cluster constituents, including shock fronts, cold fronts, X-ray substructure, radio halos, and offsets between the dark matter and the gas components. Using observations from Chandra, the Jansky Very Large Array, the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope, and the Hubble Space Telescope, we present a multiwavelength analysis of the merging Frontier Fields cluster MACS J0416.1-2403 (z=0.396), which consists of a NE and a SW subclusters whose cores are separated on the sky by ~250 kpc. We find that the NE subcluster has a compact core and hosts an X-ray cavity, yet it is not a cool core. Approximately 450 kpc south-south west of the SW subcluster, we detect a density discontinuity that corresponds to a compression factor of ~1.5. The discontinuity was most likely caused by the interaction of the SW subcluster with a less massive structure detected in the lensing maps SW of the subcluster's center. For both the NE and the SW subclusters, the dark matter and the gas components are well-aligned, suggesting that MACS J0416.1-2403 is a pre-merging system. The cluster also hosts a radio halo, which is unusual for a pre-merging system. The halo has a 1.4 GHz power of (1.06 +/- 0.09) x 10^{24} W Hz^{-1}, which is somewhat lower than expected based on the X-ray luminosity of the cluster. We suggest that we are either witnessing the birth of a radio halo, or have discovered a rare ultra-steep spectrum halo.
  • We report the analysis of the Chandra observation of XDCP J0044.0-2033, a massive, distant (z=1.579) galaxy cluster discovered in the XDCP survey. The total exposure time of 380 ks with Chandra ACIS-S provides the deepest X-ray observation currently achieved on a massive, high redshift cluster. Extended emission from the Intra Cluster Medium (ICM) is detected at a very high significance level (S/N~20) on a circular region with a 44" radius, corresponding to $R_{ext}=375$ kpc at the cluster redshift. We perform an X-ray spectral fit of the ICM emission modeling the spectrum with a single-temperature thermal mekal model. Our analysis provides a global temperature $kT=6.7^{+1.3}_{-0.9}$ keV, and a iron abundance $Z_{Fe} = 0.41_{-0.26}^{+0.29}Z_{Fe_\odot}$ (error bars correspond to 1 $\sigma$). We fit the background-subtracted surface brightness profile with a single $\beta$-model out to 44", finding a rather flat profile with no hints of a cool core. We derive the deprojected electron density profile and compute the ICM mass within the extraction radius $R_{ext}=375$ kpc to be $M_{ICM}(r<R_{ext}) = (1.48 \pm 0.20) \times 10^{13} M_\odot$. Under the assumption of hydrostatic equilibrium and assuming isothermality within $R_{ext}$, the total mass is $M_{2500}= 1.23_{-0.27}^{+0.46} \times 10 ^{14} M_\odot$ for $R_{2500} = 240_{-20}^{+30}$ kpc. Extrapolating the profile at radii larger than the extraction radius $R_{ext}$ we find $M_{500} = 3.2_{-0.6}^{+0.9} \times 10 ^{14}M_\odot$ for $R_{500} = 562_{-37}^{+50}$ kpc. This analysis establishes the existence of virialized, massive galaxy clusters at redshift $z\sim 1.6$, paving the way to the investigation of the progenitors of the most massive clusters today. Given its mass and the XDCP survey volume, XDCP J0044.0-2033 does not create significant tension with the WMAP-7 $\Lambda$CDM cosmology.
  • We present the analysis of a deep Chandra observation of a ~2L_* late-type galaxy, ESO 137-002, in the closest rich cluster A3627. The Chandra data reveal a long (>40 kpc) and narrow tail with a nearly constant width (~3 kpc) to the southeast of the galaxy, and a leading edge ~1.5 kpc from the galaxy center on the upstream side of the tail. The tail is most likely caused by the nearly edge-on stripping of ESO 137-002's ISM by ram pressure, compared to the nearly face-on stripping of ESO 137-001 discussed in our previous work. Spectral analysis of individual regions along the tail shows that the gas throughout it has a rather constant temperature, ~1 keV, very close to the temperature of the tails of ESO 137-001, if the same atomic database is used. The derived gas abundance is low (~0.2 solar with the single-kT model), an indication of the multiphase nature of the gas in the tail. The mass of the X-ray tail is only a small fraction (<5%) of the initial ISM mass of the galaxy, suggesting that the stripping is most likely at an early stage. However, with any of the single-kT, double-kT and multi-kT models we tried, the tail is always "over-pressured" relative to the surrounding ICM, which could be due to the uncertainties in the abundance, thermal vs. non-thermal X-ray emission, or magnetic support in the ICM. The H-alpha data from SOAR show a ~21 kpc tail spatially coincident with the X-ray tail, as well as a secondary tail (~12 kpc long) to the east of the main tail diverging at an angle of ~23 degrees and starting at a distance of ~7.5 kpc from the nucleus. At the position of the secondary H-alpha tail, the X-ray emission is also enhanced at the ~2 sigma level. We compare the tails of ESO 137-001 and ESO 137-002, and also compare the tails to simulations. Both the similarities and differences of the tails pose challenges to the simulations. Several implications are briefly discussed.
  • X-ray surface brightness fluctuations in the core ($650 \times 650$ kpc) region of the Coma cluster observed with XMM-Newton and Chandra are analyzed using a 2D power spectrum approach. The resulting 2D spectra are converted to 3D power spectra of gas density fluctuations. Our independent analyses of the XMM-Newton and Chandra observations are in excellent agreement and provide the most sensitive measurements of surface brightness and density fluctuations for a hot cluster. We find that the characteristic amplitude of the volume filling density fluctuations relative to the smooth underlying density distribution varies from 7-10% on scales of $\sim$500 kpc down to $\sim$5% at scales $\sim$ 30 kpc. On smaller spatial scales, projection effects smear the density fluctuations by a large factor, precluding strong limits on the fluctuations in 3D. On the largest scales probed (hundreds of kpc), the dominant contributions to the observed fluctuations most likely arise from perturbations of the gravitational potential by the two most massive galaxies in Coma, NGC4874 and NGC4889, and the low entropy gas brought to the cluster by an infalling group. Other plausible sources of X-ray surface brightness fluctuations are discussed, including turbulence, metal abundance variations, and unresolved sources. Despite a variety of possible origins for density fluctuations, the gas in the Coma cluster core is remarkably homogeneous on scales from $\sim$ 500 to $\sim$30 kpc.
  • We present new Chandra images of the X-ray emission from the core of the Perseus cluster of galaxies. The total observation time is now 1.4 Ms. New depressions in X-ray surface brightness are discovered to the north of NGC1275, which we interpret as old rising bubbles. They imply that bubbles are long-lived and do not readily breakup when rising in the hot cluster atmosphere. The existence of a 300 kpc long NNW-SSW bubble axis means there cannot be significant transverse large scale flows exceeding 100 km/s. Interesting spatial correlations are seen along that axis in early deep radio maps. A semi-circular cold front about 100 kpc west of the nucleus is seen. It separates an inner disturbed region dominated by the activity of the active nucleus of NGC1275 from the outer region where a subcluster merger dominates.
  • We present the J-band luminosity function of 1838 mid-infrared and X-ray selected AGNs in the redshift range 0<z<5.85. These luminosity functions are constructed by combining the deep multi-wavelength broad-band observations from the UV to the mid-IR of the NDWFS Bootes field with the X-ray observations of the XBootes survey and the spectroscopic observations of the same field by AGES. Our sample is primarily composed of IRAC-selected AGNs, targeted using modifications of the Stern et al.(2005) criteria, complemented by MIPS 24 microns and X-ray selected AGNs to alleviate the biases of IRAC mid-IR selection against z~4.5 quasars and AGNs faint with respect to their hosts. This sample provides an accurate link between low and high redshift AGN luminosity functions and does not suffer from the usual incompleteness of optical samples at z~3. We find that the space density of the brightest quasars strongly decreases from z=3 to z=0, while the space density of faint quasars is at least flat, and possibly increasing, over the same redshift range. At z>3 we observe a decrease in the space density of quasars of all brightnesses. We model the luminosity function by a double power-law and find that its evolution cannot be described by either pure luminosity or pure density evolution, but must be a combination of both. Our best-fit model has bright and faint power-law indices consistent with the low redshift measurements based on the 2QZ and 2SLAQ surveys and it generally agrees with the number of bright quasars predicted by other LFs at all redshifts. If we construct the QSO luminosity function using only the IRAC-selected AGNs, we find that the biases inherent to this selection method significantly modify the behavior of phi*(z) only for z<1 and have no significant impact upon the characteristic magnitude M*_J(z).
  • Recent measurements of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) angular power spectrum from the South Pole Telescope (SPT) and the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT) demonstrate the importance of understanding baryon physics when using the SZ power spectrum to constrain cosmology. This is challenging since roughly half of the SZ power at l=3000 is from low-mass systems with 10^13 h^-1 M_sun < M_500 < 1.5x10^14 h^-1 M_sun, which are more difficult to study than systems of higher mass. We present a study of the thermal pressure content for a sample of local galaxy groups from Sun et al. (2009). The group Y_{sph, 500} - M_500 relation agrees with the one for clusters derived by Arnaud et al. (2010). The group median pressure profile also agrees with the universal pressure profile for clusters derived by Arnaud et al. (2010). With this in mind, we briefly discuss several ways to alleviate the tension between the measured low SZ power and the predictions from SZ templates.
  • The Wide Field X-Ray Telescope (WFXT) is a medium-class mission designed to be 2-orders-of-magnitude more sensitive than any previous or planned X-ray mission for large area surveys and to match in sensitivity the next generation of wide-area optical, IR and radio surveys. Using an innovative wide-field X-ray optics design, WFXT provides a field of view of 1 square degree (10 times Chandra) with an angular resolution of 5" (Half Energy Width, HEW) nearly constant over the entire field of view, and a large collecting area (up to 1 m^2 at 1 keV, > 10x Chandra) over the 0.1-7 keV band. WFXTs low-Earth orbit also minimizes the particle background. In five years of operation, WFXT will carry out three extragalactic surveys at unprecedented depth and address outstanding questions in astrophysics, cosmology and fundamental physics. In this article, we illustrate the mission concept and the connection between science requirements and mission parameters.
  • We present a set of low resolution empirical SED templates for AGNs and galaxies in the wavelength range from 0.03 to 30 microns based on the multi-wavelength photometric observations of the NOAO Deep-Wide Field Survey Bootes field and the spectroscopic observations of the AGN and Galaxy Evolution Survey. Our training sample is comprised of 14448 galaxies in the redshift range 0<~z<~1 and 5347 likely AGNs in the range 0<~z<~5.58. We use our templates to determine photometric redshifts for galaxies and AGNs. While they are relatively accurate for galaxies, their accuracies for AGNs are a strong function of the luminosity ratio between the AGN and galaxy components. Somewhat surprisingly, the relative luminosities of the AGN and its host are well determined even when the photometric redshift is significantly in error. We also use our templates to study the mid-IR AGN selection criteria developed by Stern et al.(2005) and Lacy et al.(2004). We find that the Stern et al.(2005) criteria suffers from significant incompleteness when there is a strong host galaxy component and at z =~ 4.5, when the broad Halpha emission line is redshifted into the [3.6] band, but that it is little contaminated by low and intermediate redshift galaxies. The Lacy et al.(2004) criterion is not affected by incompleteness at z =~ 4.5 and is somewhat less affected by strong galaxy host components, but is heavily contaminated by low redshift star forming galaxies. Finally, we use our templates to predict the color-color distribution of sources in the upcoming WISE mission and define a color criterion to select AGNs analogous to those developed for IRAC photometry. We estimate that in between 640,000 and 1,700,000 AGNs will be identified by these criteria, but will have serious completeness problems for z >~ 3.4.
  • We study the impact of gas motions on the polarization of bright X-ray emission lines from the hot intercluster medium (ICM). The polarization naturally arises from resonant scattering of emission lines owing to a quadrupole component in the radiation field produced by a centrally peaked gas density distribution. If differential gas motions are present then a photon emitted in one region of the cluster will be scattered in another region only if their relative velocities are small enough and the Doppler shift of the photon energy does not exceed the line width. This affects both the degree and the direction of polarization. The changes in the polarization signal are in particular sensitive to the gas motions perpendicular to the line of sight. We calculate the expected degree of polarization for several patterns of gas motions, including a slow inflow expected in a simple cooling flow model and a fast outflow in an expanding spherical shock wave. In both cases, the effect of non-zero gas velocities is found to be minor. We also calculate the polarization signal for a set of clusters, taken from large-scale structure simulations and evaluate the impact of the gas bulk motions on the polarization signal. We argue that the expected degree of polarization is within reach of the next generation of space X-ray polarimeters.
  • We present the discovery of spectacular double X-ray tails associated with ESO137-001 and a possibly heated X-ray tail associated with ESO137-002, both late-type galaxies in the closest rich cluster Abell 3627. A deep Chandra observation of ESO137-001 allows us for the first time to examine the spatial and spectral properties of such X-ray tails in detail. Besides the known bright tail that extends to ~ 80 kpc from ESO137-001, a fainter and narrower secondary tail with a similar length was surprisingly revealed. There is little temperature variation along both tails. We also identified six X-ray point sources as candidates of intracluster ULXs with L(0.3-10 keV) of up to 2.5x10^40 erg s^-1. Gemini spectra of intracluster HII regions downstream of ESO137-001 are also presented, as well as the velocity map of these HII regions that shows the imprint of ESO137-001's disk rotation. For the first time, we unambiguously know that active star formation can happen in the cold ISM stripped by ICM ram pressure and it may contribute a significant amount of the intracluster light. We also report the discovery of a 40 kpc X-ray tail of another late-type galaxy in A3627, ESO137-002. Its X-ray tail seems hot, ~ 2 keV (compared to ~ 0.8 keV for ESO137-001's tails). We conclude that the high pressure environment around these two galaxies is important for their bright X-ray tails and the intracluster star formation.
  • (abridged) A Chandra observation of the X-ray bright group NGC 5044 shows that the X-ray emitting gas has been strongly perturbed by recent outbursts from the central AGN and also by motion of the central dominant galaxy relative to the group gas. The NGC 5044 group hosts many small radio quiet cavities with a nearly isotropic distribution, cool filaments, a semi-circular cold front and a two-armed spiral shaped feature of cool gas. A GMRT observation of NGC 5044 at 610 MHz shows the presence of extended radio emission with a "torus-shaped" morphology. The largest X-ray filament appears to thread the radio torus, suggesting that the lower entropy gas within the filament is material being uplifted from the center of the group. The radio emission at 235 MHz is much more extended than the emission at 610 MHz, with little overlap between the two frequencies. One component of the 235 MHz emission passes through the largest X-ray cavity and is then deflected just behind the cold front. A second detached radio lobe is also detected at 235 MHz beyond the cold front. All of the smaller X-ray cavities in the center of NGC 5044 are undetected in the GMRT observations. Since the smaller bubbles are probably no longer momentum driven by the central AGN, their motion will be affected by the group "weather" as they buoyantly rise outward. Hence, most of the enthalpy within the smaller bubbles will likely be deposited near the group center and isotropized by the group weather. The total mechanical power of the smaller radio quiet cavities is $P_c = 9.2 \times 10^{41}$erg s$^{-1}$ which is sufficient to suppress about one-half of the total radiative cooling within the central 10 kpc. This is consistent with the presence of H$\alpha$ emission within this region which shows that at least some of the gas is able to cool.
  • The dense cores of X-ray emitting gaseous halos of large elliptical galaxies with temperatures below about 0.8 keV show two prominent Fe XVII emission features, which provide a sensitive diagnostic tool to measure the effects of resonant scattering. We present here high-resolution spectra of five bright nearby elliptical galaxies, obtained with the Reflection Grating Spectrometers (RGS) on the XMM-Newton satellite. The spectra for the cores of four of the galaxies show the Fe XVII line at 15.01 Angstrom being suppressed by resonant scattering. The data for NGC 4636 in particular allow the effects of resonant scattering to be studied in detail and to prove that the 15.01 Angstrom line is suppressed only in the dense core and not in the surrounding regions. Using deprojected density and temperature profiles for this galaxy obtained with the Chandra satellite, we model the radial intensity profiles of the strongest resonance lines, accounting for the effects of resonant scattering, for different values of the characteristic turbulent velocity. Comparing the model to the data, we find that the isotropic turbulent velocities on spatial scales smaller than about 1 kpc are less than 100 km/s and the turbulent pressure support in the galaxy core is smaller than 5% of the thermal pressure at the 90% confidence level, and less than 20% at 95% confidence. Neglecting the effects of resonant scattering in spectral fitting of the inner 2 kpc core of NGC 4636 will lead to underestimates of the chemical abundances of Fe and O by ~10-20%.
  • We discuss the central role played by the X-ray study of hot baryons within galaxy clusters to reconstruct the assembly of cosmic structures and to trace the past history of star formation and accretion onto supermassive Black Holes (BHs). We shortly review the progress in this field contributed by the current generation of X-ray telescopes. Then, we focus on the outstanding scientific questions that have been opened by observations carried out in the last years and that represent the legacy of Chandra and XMM: (a) When and how is entropy injected into the inter-galactic medium (IGM)? (b) What is the history of metal enrichment of the IGM? (c) What physical mechanisms determine the presence of cool cores in galaxy clusters? (d) How is the appearance of proto-clusters at z~2 related to the peak of star formation activity and BH accretion? We show that a highly efficient observational strategy to address these questions is to carry out a large-area X-ray survey, reaching a sensitivity comparable to that of deep Chandra and XMM pointings, but extending over several thousands of square degrees. A similar survey can only be carried out with a Wide-Field X-ray Telescope (WFXT), which combines a high survey speed with a sharp PSF across the entire FoV. We emphasize the important synergies that WFXT will have with a number of future ground-based and space telescopes, covering from the radio to the X-ray bands. Finally, we discuss the immense legacy value that such a mission will have for extragalactic astronomy at large.
  • While the exceptional sensitivity of Chandra and XMM-Newton has resulted in revolutionary studies of the Galactic neighborhood in the soft (<10 keV) X-ray band, there are many open questions. We discuss these issues and how they would be addressed by very wide-area (> 100 sq. deg.) X-ray surveys.
  • The hot, diffuse gas that fills the largest overdense structures in the Universe -- clusters of galaxies and a web of giant filaments connecting them -- provides us with tools to address a wide array of fundamental astrophysical and cosmological questions via observations in the X-ray band. Clusters are sensitive cosmological probes. To utilize their full potential for precision cosmology in the following decades, we must precisely understand their physics -- from their cool cores stirred by jets produced by the central supermassive black hole (itself fed by inflow of intracluster gas), to their outskirts, where the infall of intergalactic medium (IGM) drives shocks and accelerates cosmic rays. Beyond the cluster confines lies the virtually unexplored warm IGM, believed to contain most of the baryonic matter in the present-day Universe. As a depository of all the matter ever ejected from galaxies, it carries unique information on the history of energy and metal production in the Universe. Currently planned major observatories, such as Astro-H and IXO, will make deep inroads into these areas, but to see the most interesting parts of the picture will require an almost science-fiction-grade facility with tens of m^2 of effective area, subarcsecond angular resolution, a matching imaging calorimeter and a super high-dispersion spectrograph, such as Generation-X.
  • We present a systematic analysis of 43 galaxy groups (kT_500=0.7-2.7 keV or M_500=10^13-10^14 h^-1 M_solar, 0.012<z<0.12), based on Chandra archival data. With robust background subtraction and modeling, we trace gas properties to >r_2500 for all 43 groups. For 23 groups, gas properties can be robustly derived to or extrapolated to r_500. We show that in spite of the large variation in T profiles inside 0.15 r_500, the T profiles of these groups are similar at >0.15 r_500 and are consistent with a "universal temperature profile". We present the entropy-T relations at six characteristics radii (30 kpc - r_500), for 43 groups from this work and 14 clusters from Vikhlinin et al. (2008). Despite large scatter in the entropy values at <0.15 r_500, the intrinsic scatter from r_2500 is much smaller and remains the same (~10%) to r_500. We also present scaling relations for the gas fraction. It appears that the average gas fraction between r_2500 and r_500 has no temperature dependence, ~ 0.12 for 1 - 10 keV systems. The group gas fractions within r_2500 are generally low and have large scatter. This work shows that the difference of groups from hotter clusters stems from the difficulty of compressing group gas to inside r_2500. The large scatter of the group gas fraction within r_2500 causes large scatter in the group entropy around the center and may be responsible for the large scatter of the luminosities. Nevertheless, the groups appear more regular and more like clusters beyond r_2500, from the results on gas fraction and entropy. Therefore, mass proxies can be extended into low mass systems. The M-T and M-Y relations derived in this work are indeed well behaved down to at least 2E13 h^-1 M_solar.
  • We use deep Chandra observations to measure the emissivity of the unresolved X-ray emission in the elliptical galaxy NGC 3379. After elimination of bright, low-mass X-ray binaries with luminosities >10^{36 erg/sec, we find that the remaining unresolved X-ray emission is characterized by an emissivity per unit stellar mass L_x/M_stars ~8.2x10^{27} erg/s/M_sun in the 0.5-2 keV energy band. This value is in good agreement with those previousely determined for the dwarf elliptical galaxy M32, the bulge of the spiral galaxy M31 and the Milky Way, as well as with the integrated X-ray emissivity of cataclysmic variables and coronally active binaries in the Solar neighborhood. This strongly suggests that i) the bulk of the unresolved X-ray emission in NGC 3379 is produced by its old stellar population and ii) the old stellar populations in all galaxies can be characterized by a universal value of X-ray emissivity per unit stellar mass or per unit K band luminosity.
  • We combine the results of the Spitzer IRAC Shallow Survey and the Chandra XBootes Survey of the 8.5 square degrees Bootes field of the NOAO Deep Wide- Field Survey to produce the largest comparison of mid-IR and X-ray sources to date. The comparison is limited to sources with X-ray fluxes >8x10-15 erg cm-2s-1 in the 0.5-7.0 keV range and mid-IR sources with 3.6 um fluxes brighter than 18.4 mag (12.3 uJy). In this most sensitive IRAC band, 85% of the 3086 X-ray sources have mid-IR counterparts at an 80% confidence level based on a Bayesian matching technique. Only 2.5% of the sample have no IRAC counterpart at all based on visual inspection. Even for a smaller but a significantly deeper Chandra survey in the same field, the IRAC Shallow Survey recovers most of the X-ray sources. A majority (65%) of the Chandra sources detected in all four IRAC bands occupy a well-defined region of IRAC [3.6] - [4.5] vs [5.8] - [8.0] color-color space. These X-ray sources are likely infrared luminous, unobscured type I AGN with little mid-infrared flux contributed by the AGN host galaxy. Of the remaining Chandra sources, most are lower luminosity type I and type II AGN whose mid-IR emission is dominated by the host galaxy, while approximately 5% are either Galactic stars or very local galaxies.
  • The dissipation of turbulent gas motions is one of the likely mechanisms that has been proposed to heat the intracluster medium (ICM) in the cores of clusters and groups of galaxies. We consider the impact of gas motions on the width of the most prominent X-ray emission lines. For heavy elements (like iron) the expected linewidth is much larger than the width due to pure thermal broadening and the contribution due to turbulent gas motions should be easily detected with the new generation of X-ray micro-calorimeters, such as the Spektr-RG calorimeter (SXC). For instance in the Perseus cluster the turbulent velocity required to balance radiative cooling (as derived by Rebusco et al. 2006), would imply a width of the 6.7 keV Fe line of 10-20 eV, while the pure thermal broadening is ~4 eV. The radial dependence of the linewidth is sensitive to i) the radial dependence of the velocity amplitude and ii) the "directionality" of the stochastic motions (e.g. isotropic turbulence or predominantly radial gas motions). If the width of several lines, characteristic for different gas temperatures, can be measured, then it should be possible to probe both the "directionality" and the amplitude of the gas motions. Moreover a measurement of the width would put a lower limit on the amount of the kinetic energy available for dissipation, giving a constraint on the ICM models.
  • We have assembled a sample of 115 galaxy clusters at 0.1<z<1.3 with archived Chandra ACIS-I observations. We present X-ray images of the clusters and make available region files containing contours of the smoothed X-ray emission. The structural properties of the clusters were investigated and we found a significant absence of relaxed clusters (as determined by centroid shift measurements) at z>0.5. The slope of the surface brightness profiles at large radii were steeper on average by 15% than the slope obtained by fitting a simple beta-model to the emission. This slope was also found to be correlated with cluster temperature, with some indication that the correlation is weaker for the clusters at z>0.5. We measured the mean metal abundance of the cluster gas as a function of redshift and found significant evolution, with the abundances dropping by 50% between z=0.1 and z~1. This evolution was still present (although less significant) when the cluster cores were excluded from the abundance measurements, indicating that the evolution is not solely due to the disappearance of relaxed, cool core clusters (which are known to have enhanced core metal abundances) from the population at z>0.5.