• This study's objective was to exploit infrared VVV (VISTA Variables in the Via Lactea) photometry for high latitude RRab stars to establish an accurate Galactic Centre distance. RRab candidates were discovered and reaffirmed ($n=4194$) by matching $K_s$ photometry with templates via $\chi^2$ minimization, and contaminants were reduced by ensuring targets adhered to a strict period-amplitude ($\Delta K_s$) trend and passed the Elorietta et al. classifier. The distance to the Galactic Centre was determined from a high latitude Bulge subsample ($|b|>4^{o}$, $R_{GC}=8.30 \pm 0.36$ kpc, random uncertainty is relatively negligible), and importantly, the comparatively low color-excess and uncrowded location mitigated uncertainties tied to the extinction law, the magnitude-limited nature of the analysis, and photometric contamination. Circumventing those problems resulted in a key uncertainty being the $M_{K_s}$ relation, which was derived using LMC RRab stars ($M_{K_s}=-(2.66\pm0.06) \log{P}-(1.03\pm0.06)$, $(J-K_s)_0=(0.31\pm0.04) \log{P} + (0.35\pm0.02)$, assuming $\mu_{0,LMC}=18.43$). The Galactic Centre distance was not corrected for the cone-effect. Lastly, a new distance indicator emerged as brighter overdensities in the period-magnitude-amplitude diagrams analyzed, which arise from blended RRab and red clump stars. Blending may thrust faint extragalactic variables into the range of detectability.
  • We focus on empirically measure the p-factor of a homogeneous sample of 29 LMC and 10 SMC Cepheids for which an accurate average LMC/SMC distance were estimated from eclipsing binary systems. We used the SPIPS algorithm, which is an implementation of the BW method. As opposed to other conventional use, SPIPS combines all observables, i.e. radial velocities, multi-band photometry and interferometry into a consistent physical modeling to estimate the parameters of the stars. The large number and their redundancy insure its robustness and improves the statistical precision. We successfully estimated the p-factor of several MC Cepheids. Combined with our previous Galactic results, we find the following P-p relation: -0.08(log P-1.18)+1.24. We find no evidence of a metallicity dependent p-factor. We also derive a new calibration of the P-R relation, logR=0.684(log P-0.517)+1.489, with an intrinsic dispersion of 0.020. We detect an IR excess for all stars at 3.6 and 4.5um, which might be the signature of circumstellar dust. We measure a mean offset of $\Delta m_{3.6}=0.057$mag and $\Delta m_{4.5}=0.065$mag. We provide a new P-p relation based on a multi-wavelengths fit, and can be used for the distance scale calibration from the BW method. The dispersion is due to the MCs width we took into account because individual Cepheids distances are unknown. The new P-R relation has a small intrinsic dispersion, i.e. 4.5% in radius. Such precision will allow us to accurately apply the BW method to nearby galaxies. Finally, the IR excesses we detect raise again the issue on using mid-IR wavelengths to derive P-L relation and calibrate the $H_0$. These IR excesses might be the signature of circumstellar dust, and are never taken into account when applying the BW method at those wavelengths. Our measured offsets may give an average bias of 2.8% on the distances derived through mid-IR P-L relations.
  • We give an update on our long-term program of Galactic Cepheids started in 2012, whose goal is to measure the visual orbits of Cepheid companions. Using the VLTI/PIONIER and CHARA/MIRC instruments, we have now detected several com- panions, and we already have a good orbital coverage for several of them. By combining interferometry and radial velocities, we can now derive all the orbital elements of the systems, and we will be soon able to estimate the Cepheid masses.
  • High quality spectra of 90 blue supergiant stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud are analyzed with respect to effective temperature, gravity, metallicity, reddening, extinction and extinction law. An average metallicity, based on Fe and Mg abundances, relative to the Sun of [Z] = -0.35 +/- 0.09 dex is obtained. The reddening distribution peaks at E(B-V) = 0.08 mag, but significantly larger values are also encountered. A wide distribution of the ratio of extinction to reddening is found ranging from Rv = 2 to 6. The results are used to investigate the blue supergiant relationship between flux-weighted gravity, and absolute bolometric magnitude. The existence of a tight relationship, the FGLR, is confirmed. However, in contrast to previous work the observations reveal that the FGLR is divided into two parts with a different slope. For flux-weighted gravities larger than 1.30 dex the slope is similar as found in previous work, but the relationship becomes significantly steeper for smaller values of the flux-weighted gravity. A new calibration of the FGLR for extragalactic distance determinations is provided.
  • The projection factor p is the key quantity used in the Baade-Wesselink (BW) method for distance determination; it converts radial velocities into pulsation velocities. Several methods are used to determine p, such as geometrical and hydrodynamical models or the inverse BW approach when the distance is known. We analyze new HARPS-N spectra of delta Cep to measure its cycle-averaged atmospheric velocity gradient in order to better constrain the projection factor. We first apply the inverse BW method to derive p directly from observations. The projection factor can be divided into three subconcepts: (1) a geometrical effect (p0); (2) the velocity gradient within the atmosphere (fgrad); and (3) the relative motion of the optical pulsating photosphere with respect to the corresponding mass elements (fo-g). We then measure the fgrad value of delta Cep for the first time. When the HARPS-N mean cross-correlated line-profiles are fitted with a Gaussian profile, the projection factor is pcc-g = 1.239 +/- 0.034(stat) +/- 0.023(syst). When we consider the different amplitudes of the radial velocity curves that are associated with 17 selected spectral lines, we measure projection factors ranging from 1.273 to 1.329. We find a relation between fgrad and the line depth measured when the Cepheid is at minimum radius. This relation is consistent with that obtained from our best hydrodynamical model of delta Cep and with our projection factor decomposition. Using the observational values of p and fgrad found for the 17 spectral lines, we derive a semi-theoretical value of fo-g. We alternatively obtain fo-g = 0.975+/-0.002 or 1.006+/-0.002 assuming models using radiative transfer in plane-parallel or spherically symmetric geometries, respectively. The new HARPS-N observations of delta Cep are consistent with our decomposition of the projection factor.
  • Single star evolution does not allow extremely low-mass stars to cross the classical instability strip (IS) during the Hubble time. However, within binary evolution framework low-mass stars can appear inside the IS once the mass transfer (MT) is taken into account. Triggered by a discovery of low-mass 0.26 Msun RR Lyrae-like variable in a binary system, OGLE-BLG-RRLYR-02792, we investigate the occurrence of similar binary components in the IS, which set up a new class of low-mass pulsators. They are referred to as Binary Evolution Pulsators (BEPs) to underline the interaction between components, which is crucial for substantial mass loss prior to the IS entrance. We simulate a population of 500 000 metal-rich binaries and report that 28 143 components of binary systems experience severe MT (loosing up to 90% of mass), followed by at least one IS crossing in luminosity range of RR Lyrae (RRL) or Cepheid variables. A half of these systems enter the IS before the age of 4 Gyr. BEPs display a variety of physical and orbital parameters, with the most important being the BEP mass in range 0.2-0.8 Msun, and the orbital period in range 10-2500 d. Based on the light curve only, BEPs can be misclassified as genuine classical pulsators, and as such they would contaminate genuine RRL and classical Cepheid variables at levels of 0.8% and 5%, respectively. We state that the majority of BEPs will remain undetected and we discuss relevant detection limitations.
  • The B-W method is used to determine the distance of Cepheids and consists in combining the angular size variations of the star, as derived from infrared surface-brightness relations or interferometry, with its linear size variation, as deduced from visible spectroscopy using the projection factor. While many Cepheids have been intensively observed by infrared beam combiners, only a few have been observed in the visible. This paper is part of a project to observe Cepheids in the visible with interferometry as a counterpart to infrared observations already in hand. Observations of delta Cep itself were secured with the VEGA/CHARA instrument over the full pulsation cycle of the star. These visible interferometric data are consistent in first approximation with a quasi-hydrostatic model of pulsation surrounded by a static circumstellar environment (CSE) with a size of theta_cse=8.9 +/- 3.0 mas and a relative flux contribution of f_cse=0.07+/-0.01. A model of visible nebula (a background source filling the field of view of the interferometer) with the same relative flux contribution is also consistent with our data at small spatial frequencies. However, in both cases, we find discrepancies in the squared visibilities at high spatial frequencies (maximum 2sigma) with two different regimes over the pulsation cycle of the star, phi=0.0-0.8 and phi=0.8-1.0. We provide several hypotheses to explain these discrepancies, but more observations and theoretical investigations are necessary before a firm conclusion can be drawn. For the first time we have been able to detect in the visible domain a resolved structure around delta~Cep. We have also shown that a simple model cannot explain the observations, and more work will be necessary in the future, both on observations and modelling.
  • In the course of a project to study eclipsing binary stars in vinicity of the Sun, we found that the cooler component of LL Aqr is a solar twin candidate. This is the first known star with properties of a solar twin existing in a non-interacting eclipsing binary, offering an excellent opportunity to fully characterise its physical properties with very high precision. We used extensive multi-band, archival photometry and the Super-WASP project and high-resolution spectroscopy obtained from the HARPS and CORALIE spectrographs. The spectra of both components were decomposed and a detailed LTE abundance analysis was performed. The light and radial velocity curves were simultanously analysed with the Wilson-Devinney code. The resulting highly precise stellar parameters were used for a detailed comparison with PARSEC, MESA, and GARSTEC stellar evolution models. LL Aqr consists of two main-sequence stars (F9 V + G3 V) with masses of M1 = 1.1949$\pm$0.0007 and M2=1.0337$\pm$0.0007 $M_\odot$, radii R1 = 1.321$\pm$0.006 and R2 = 1.002$\pm$0.005 $R_\odot$, temperatures T1=6080$\pm$45 K and T2=5703$\pm$50 K and solar chemical composition [M/H]=0.02$\pm$0.05 dex. The absolute dimensions, radiative and photometric properties, and atmospheric abundances of the secondary are all fully consistent with being a solar twin. Both stars are cooler by about 3.5 $\sigma$ or less metal abundant by 5$\sigma$ than predicted by standard sets of stellar evolution models. When advanced modelling was performed, we found that full agreement with observations can only be obtained for values of the mixing length and envelope overshooting parameters that are hard to accept. The most reasonable and physically justified model fits found with MESA and GARSTEC codes still have discrepancies with observations but only at the level of 1$\sigma$.
  • Near-infrared color-excess and extinction ratios are essential for establishing the cosmic distance scale and probing the Galaxy, particularly when analyzing targets attenuated by significant dust. A robust determination of those ratios followed from leveraging new infrared observations from the VVV survey, wherein numerous bulge RR Lyrae and Type II Cepheids were discovered, in addition to $BVJHK_{s}(3.4\rightarrow22)\mu m$ data for classical Cepheids and O-stars occupying the broader Galaxy. The apparent optical color-excess ratios vary significantly with Galactic longitude ($\ell$), whereas the near-infrared results are comparatively constant with $\ell$ and Galactocentric distance ($\langle E(J-\overline{3.5\mu m})/E(J-K_s) \rangle =1.28\pm0.03$). The results derived imply that classical Cepheids and O-stars display separate optical trends ($R_{V,BV}$) with $\ell$, which appear to disfavor theories advocating a strict and marked decrease in dust size with increasing Galactocentric distance. The classical Cepheid, Type II Cepheid, and RR Lyrae variables are characterized by $\langle A_{J}/E(J-K_s) \rangle = \langle R_{J,JK_s} \rangle =1.49\pm0.05$ ($\langle A_{K_s}/A_J \rangle =0.33\pm0.02$), whereas the O-stars are expectedly impacted by emission beyond $3.6 \mu m$. The mean optical ratios characterizing classical Cepheids and O-stars are approximately $\langle R_{V,BV} \rangle \sim3.1$ and $\langle R_{V,BV} \rangle \sim3.3$, respectively.
  • We report new CHARA/MIRC interferometric observations of the Cepheid archetype $\delta$ Cep, which aimed at detecting the newly discovered spectroscopic companion. We reached a maximum dynamic range $\Delta H $ = 6.4, 5.8, and 5.2 mag, respectively within the relative distance to the Cepheid $r < 25$ mas, $25 < r < 50$ mas and $50 < r < 100$ mas. Our observations did not show strong evidence of a companion. We have a marginal detection at $3\sigma$ with a flux ratio of 0.21\%, but nothing convincing as we found other possible probable locations. We ruled out the presence of companion with a spectral type earlier than F0V, A1V and B9V, respectively for the previously cited ranges $r$. From our estimated sensitivity limits and the Cepheid light curve, we derived lower-limit magnitudes in the $H$ band for this possible companion to be $H_\mathrm{comp} > 9.15, 8.31$ and 7.77 mag, respectively for $r < 25$ mas, $25 < r < 50$ mas and $50 < r < 100$ mas. We also found that to be consistent with the predicted orbital period, the companion has to be located at a projected separation $< 24$ mas with a spectral type later than a F0V star.
  • We present an analysis of a new detached eclipsing binary, OGLE-LMC-ECL-25658, in the Large Magellanic Cloud. The system consists of two late G-type giant stars on an eccentric orbit and orbital period of ~200 days. The system shows total eclipses and the components have similar temperatures, making it ideal for a precise distance determination. Using multi-color photometric and high resolution spectroscopic data, we have performed an analysis of light and radial velocity curves simultaneously using the Wilson Devinney code. We derived orbital and physical parameters of the binary with a high precision of < 1 %. The masses and surface metallicities of the components are virtually the same and equal to 2.23 +/- 0.02 M_sun and [Fe/H] = -0.63 +/- 0.10 dex. However their radii and rates of rotation show a distinct trace of differential stellar evolution. The distance to the system was calculated using an infrared calibration between V-band surface brightness and (V-K) color, leading to a distance modulus of (m-M) = 18.452 +/- 0.023 (statistical) +/- 0.046 (systematic). Because OGLE-LMC-ECL-25658 is located relatively far from the LMC barycenter we applied a geometrical correction for its position in the LMC disc using the van der Marel et al. model of the LMC. The resulting barycenter distance to the galaxy is d_LMC = 50.30 +/- 0.53 (stat.) kpc, and is in perfect agreement with the earlier result of Pietrzynski et al.(2013).
  • Context: Independent distance estimates are particularly useful to check the precision of other distance indicators, while accurate and precise masses are necessary to constrain evolution models. Aim: The goal is to measure the masses and distance of the detached eclipsing-binary TZ~For with a precision level lower than 1\,\% using a fully geometrical and empirical method. Method: We obtained the first interferometric observations of TZ~For with the VLTI/PIONIER combiner, which we combined with new and precise radial velocity measurements to derive its three-dimensional orbit, masses, and distance. Results: The system is well resolved by PIONIER at each observing epoch, which allowed a combined fit with eleven astrometric positions. Our derived values are in a good agreement with previous work, but with an improved precision. We measured the mass of both components to be $M_1 = 2.057 \pm 0.001\,M_\odot$ and $M_2 = 1.958 \pm 0.001\,M_\odot$. The comparison with stellar evolution models gives an age of the system of $1.20 \pm 0.10$\,Gyr. We also derived the distance to the system with a precision level of 1.1\,\%: $d = 185.9 \pm 1.9$\,pc. Such precise and accurate geometrical distances to eclipsing binaries provide a unique opportunity to test the absolute calibration of the surface brightness-colour relation for late-type stars, and will also provide the best opportunity to check on the future Gaia measurements for possible systematic errors.
  • Solid insight into the physics of the inner Milky Way is key to understanding our Galaxy's evolution, but extreme dust obscuration has historically hindered efforts to map the area along the Galactic mid-plane. New comprehensive near-infrared time-series photometry from the VVV Survey has revealed 35 classical Cepheids, tracing a previously unobserved component of the inner Galaxy, namely a ubiquitous inner thin disk of young stars along the Galactic mid-plane, traversing across the bulge. The discovered period (age) spread of these classical Cepheids implies a continuous supply of newly formed stars in the central region of the Galaxy over the last 100 million years.
  • Our aim is to precisely measure the physical parameters of the eclipsing binary IO Aqr and derive a distance to this system by applying a surface brightness - colour relation. Our motivation is to combine these parameters with future precise distance determinations from the GAIA space mission to derive precise surface brightness - colour relations for stars. We extensively used photometry from the Super-WASP and ASAS projects and precise radial velocities obtained from HARPS and CORALIE high-resolution spectra. We analysed light curves with the code JKTEBOP and radial velocity curves with the Wilson-Devinney program. We found that IO Aqr is a hierarchical triple system consisting of a double-lined short-period (P=2.37 d) spectroscopic binary and a low-luminosity and low-mass companion star orbiting the binary with a period of ~25000 d (~70 yr) on a very eccentric orbit. We derive high-precision (better than 1%) physical parameters of the inner binary, which is composed of two slightly evolved main-sequence stars (F5 V-IV + F6 V-IV) with masses of M1=1.569+/-0.004 and M2=1.655+/-0.004 M_sun and radii R1=2.19+/-0.02 and R2=2.49+/-0.02 R_sun. The companion is most probably a late K-type dwarf with mass ~0.6 M_sun. The distance to the system resulting from applying a (V-K) surface brightness - colour relation is 255+/-6(stat.)+/-6(sys.) pc, which agrees well with the Hipparcos value of 270+/-73 pc, but is more precise by a factor of eight.
  • We obtained single-phase near-infrared (NIR) magnitudes in the $J$- and $K$-band for a sample of 33 RR Lyrae stars in the Carina dSph galaxy. Applying different theoretical and empirical calibrations of the NIR period-luminosity-metallicity relation for RR Lyrae stars, we find consistent results and obtain a true, reddening-corrected distance modulus of 20.118 $\pm$ 0.017 (statistical) $\pm$ 0.11 (systematic) mag. This value is in excellent agreement with the results obtained in the context of the Araucaria Project from NIR photometry of Red Clump stars (20.165 $\pm$ 0.015) and Tip of Red Giant Branch (20.09 $\pm$ 0.03 $\pm$ 0.12 mag in $J$-band, 20.14 $\pm$ 0.04 $\pm$ 0.14 mag in $K$-band), as well as with most independent distance determinations to this galaxy. The near-infrared RR Lyrae method proved to be a reliable tool for accurate distance determination at the 5 percent level or better, particularly for galaxies and globular clusters that lack young standard candles, like Cepheids.
  • Long-baseline interferometry is an important technique to spatially resolve binary or multiple systems in close orbits. By combining several telescopes together and spectrally dispersing the light, it is possible to detect faint components around bright stars. Aims. We provide a rigorous and detailed method to search for high-contrast companions around stars, determine the detection level, and estimate the dynamic range from interferometric observations. We developed the code CANDID (Companion Analysis and Non-Detection in Interferometric Data), a set of Python tools that allows us to search systematically for point-source, high-contrast companions and estimate the detection limit. The search pro- cedure is made on a N x N grid of fit, whose minimum needed resolution is estimated a posteriori. It includes a tool to estimate the detection level of the companion in the number of sigmas. The code CANDID also incorporates a robust method to set a 3{\sigma} detection limit on the flux ratio, which is based on an analytical injection of a fake companion at each point in the grid. We used CANDID to search for the companions around the binary Cepheids V1334 Cyg, AX Cir, RT Aur, AW Per, SU Cas, and T Vul. First, we showed that our previous discoveries of the components orbiting V1334 Cyg and AX Cir were detected at > 13 sigmas. The companion around AW Per is detected at more than 15 sigmas with a flux ratio of f = 1.22 +/- 0.30 %. We made a possible detection of the companion orbiting RT Aur with f = 0.22 +/- 0.11 %. It was detected at 3.8{\sigma} using the closure phases only, and so more observations are needed to confirm the detection. We also set the detection limit for possible undetected companions. We found that there is no companion with a spectral type earlier than B7V, A5V, F0V, B9V, A0V, and B9V orbiting V1334 Cyg, AX Cir, RT Aur, AW Per, SU Cas, and T Vul, respectively.
  • We have analyzed the double-lined eclipsing binary system ASAS J180057-2333.8 from the All Sky Automated Survey (ASAS) catalogue . We measure absolute physical and orbital parameters for this system based on archival $V$-band and $I$-band ASAS photometry, as well as on high-resolution spectroscopic data obtained with ESO 3.6m/HARPS and CORALIE spectrographs. The physical and orbital parameters of the system were derived with an accuracy of about 0.5 - 3%. The system is a very rare configuration of two bright well-detached giants of spectral types K1 and K4 and luminosity class II. The radii of the stars are $R_1$ = 52.12 $\pm$ 1.38 and $R_2$ = 67.63 $\pm$ 1.40 R$_\odot$ and their masses are $M_1$ = 4.914 $\pm$ 0.021 and $M_2$ = 4.875$\pm$ 0.021 M$_\odot$ . The exquisite accuracy of 0.5% obtained for the masses of the components is one of the best mass determinations for giants. We derived a precise distance to the system of 2.14 $\pm$ 0.06 kpc (stat.) $\pm$ 0.05 (syst.) which places the star in the Sagittarius-Carina arm. The Galactic rotational velocity of the star is $\Theta_s=258 \pm 26$ km s$^{-1}$ assuming $\Theta_0=238$ km s$^{-1}$. A comparison with PARSEC isochrones places the system at the early phase of core helium burning with an age of slightly larger than 100 million years. The effect of overshooting on stellar evolutionary tracks was explored using the MESA star code.
  • We present here the first spectroscopic and photometric analysis of the double-lined eclipsing binary containing the classical, first-overtone Cepheid OGLE-LMC-CEP-2532 (MACHO 81.8997.87). The system has an orbital period of 800 days and the Cepheid is pulsating with a period of 2.035 days. Using spectroscopic data from three high-class telescopes and photometry from three surveys spanning 7500 days we are able to derive the dynamical masses for both stars with an accuracy better than 3%. This makes the Cepheid in this system one of a few classical Cepheids with an accurate dynamical mass determination (M_1=3.90 +/- 0.10 M_sun). The companion is probably slightly less massive (3.82 +/- 0.10 M_sun), but may have the same mass within errors (M_2/M_1= 0.981 +/- 0.015). The system has an age of about 185 million years and the Cepheid is in a more advanced evolutionary stage. For the first time precise parameters are derived for both stars in this system. Due to the lack of the secondary eclipse for many years not much was known about the Cepheid's companion. In our analysis we used extra information from the pulsations and the orbital solution from the radial velocity curve. The best model predicts a grazing secondary eclipse shallower than 1 mmag, hence undetectable in the data, about 370 days after the primary eclipse. The dynamical mass obtained here is the most accurate known for a first-overtone Cepheid and will contribute to the solution of the Cepheid mass discrepancy problem.
  • We report the discovery of a pair of extremely reddened classical Cepheid variable stars located in the Galactic plane behind the bulge, using near-infrared time-series photometry from the VVV Survey. This is the first time that such objects have ever been found in the opposite side of the Galactic plane. The Cepheids have almost identical periods, apparent brightnesses and colors. From the near-infrared Leavitt law, we determine their distances with ~1.5% precision and ~8% accuracy. We find that they have a same total extinction of A(V)~32 mag, and are located at the same heliocentric distance of <d>=11.4+/-0.9 kpc, and less than 1 pc from the true Galactic plane. Their similar periods indicate that the Cepheids are also coeval, with an age of ~48+/-3 Myr, according to theoretical models. They are separated by an angular distance of only 18.3", corresponding to a projected separation of ~1 pc. Their position coincides with the expected location of the Far 3 kpc Arm behind the bulge. Such a tight pair of similar classical Cepheids indicates the presence of an underlying young open cluster, that is both hidden behind heavy extinction and disguised by the dense stellar field of the bulge. All our attempts to directly detect this "invisible cluster" have failed, and deeper observations are needed.
  • We present the first full orbital and physical analysis of HD 187669, recognized by the All-Sky Automated Survey (ASAS) as the eclipsing binary ASAS J195222-3233.7. We combined multi-band photometry from the ASAS and SuperWASP public archives and 0.41-m PROMPT robotic telescopes with our high-precision radial velocities from the HARPS spectrograph. Two different approaches were used for the analysis: 1) fitting to all data simultaneously with the WD code, and 2) analysing each light curve (with JKTEBOP) and RVs separately and combining the partial results at the end. This system also shows a total primary (deeper) eclipse, lasting for about 6 days. A spectrum obtained during this eclipse was used to perform atmospheric analysis with the MOOG and SME codes in order to constrain physical parameters of the secondary. We found that ASAS J195222-3233.7 is a double-lined spectroscopic binary composed of two evolved, late-type giants, with masses of $M_1 = 1.504\pm0.004$ and $M_2=1.505\pm0.004$ M$_\odot$, and radii of $R_1 = 11.33\pm0.28$ and $R_2=22.62\pm0.50$ R$_\odot$, slightly less metal abundant than the Sun, on a $P=88.39$ d orbit. Its properties are well reproduced by a 2.38 Gyr isochrone, and thanks to the metallicity estimation from the totality spectrum and high precision in masses, it was possible to constrain the age down to 0.1 Gyr. It is the first so evolved galactic eclipsing binary measured with such a good accuracy, and as such is a unique benchmark for studying the late stages of stellar evolution.
  • This study aims to increase awareness concerning the pernicious effects of photometric contamination (crowding/blending), since it can propagate an undesirable systematic offset into the cosmic distance scale. The latest Galactic Cepheid W_VIc and Spitzer calibrations were employed to establish distances for classical Cepheids in IC 1613 and NGC 6822, thus enabling the impact of photometric contamination to be assessed in concert with metallicity. Distances (W_VIc, [3.6]) for Cepheids in IC 1613 exhibit a galactocentric dependence, whereby Cepheids near the core appear (spuriously) too bright (r_g < 2'). That effect is attributed to photometric contamination from neighboring (unresolved) stars, since the stellar density and surface brightness may increase with decreasing galactocentric distance. The impact is relatively indiscernible for a comparison sample of Cepheids occupying NGC 6822, a result which is partly attributable to that sample being nearer than the metal-poor galaxy IC 1613. W_VIc and [3.6] distances for relatively uncontaminated Cepheids in each galaxy are comparable, thus confirming that period-magnitude relations (Leavitt Law) in those bands are relatively insensitive to metallicity (d[Fe/H] ~ 1).
  • The aim of this work is to improve the SBC relation for early-type stars in the $-1 \leq V-K \leq 0$ color domain, using optical interferometry. Observations of eight B- and A-type stars were secured with the VEGA/CHARA instrument in the visible. The derived uniform disk angular diameters were converted into limb darkened angular diameters and included in a larger sample of 24 stars, already observed by interferometry, in order to derive a revised empirical relation for O, B, A spectral type stars with a V-K color index ranging from -1 to 0. We also took the opportunity to check the consistency of the SBC relation up to $V-K \simeq 4$ using 100 additional measurements. We determined the uniform disk angular diameter for the eight following stars: $\gamma$ Ori, $\zeta$ Per, $8$ Cyg, $\iota$ Her, $\lambda$ Aql, $\zeta$ Peg, $\gamma$ Lyr, and $\delta$ Cyg with V-K color ranging from -0.70 to 0.02 and typical precision of about $1.5\%$. Using our total sample of 132 stars with $V-K$ colors index ranging from about $-1$ to $4$, we provide a revised SBC relation. For late-type stars ($0 \leq V-K \leq 4$), the results are consistent with previous studies. For early-type stars ($-1 \leq V-K \leq 0$), our new VEGA/CHARA measurements combined with a careful selection of the stars (rejecting stars with environment or stars with a strong variability), allows us to reach an unprecedented precision of about 0.16 magnitude or $\simeq 7\%$ in terms of angular diameter.
  • The status of our work on binary classical cepheid systems in the Large Magellanic Cloud is presented. We report on results from our follow up of two eclipsing binary cepheids OGLE-LMC-CEP-0227 and OGLE-LMC-CEP-1812. Here we presented for the first time confirmation that a third cepheid OGLE-LMC-CEP-2532 is a true eclipsing binary cepheid with a period of 800 days. Two other very good candidates for eclipsing binaries detected during OGLE-IV survey are also discussed.
  • Classical Cepheid stars have been considered since more than a century as reliable tools to estimate distances in the universe thanks to their Period-Luminosity (P-L) relationship. Moreover, they are also powerful astrophysical laboratories, providing fundamental clues for studying the pulsation and evolution of intermediate-mass stars. When in binary systems, we can investigate the age and evolution of the Cepheid, estimate the mass and distance, and constrain theoretical models. However, most of the companions are located too close to the Cepheid (1-40 mas) to be spatially resolved with a 10-meter class telescope. The only way to spatially resolve such systems is to use long-baseline interferometry. Recently, we have started a unique and long-term interferometric program that aims at detecting and characterizing physical parameters of the Cepheid companions, with as main objectives the determination of accurate masses and geometric distances.
  • Optical interferometry is the only technique giving access to milli-arcsecond (mas) resolution at infrared wavelengths. For Cepheids, this is a powerful and unique tool to detect the orbiting companions and the circumstellar envelopes (CSE). CSEs are interesting because they might be used to trace the Cepheid evolution history, and more particularly they could impact the distance scale. Cepheids belonging to binary systems offer an unique opportunity to make progress in resolving the Cepheid mass discrepancy. The combination of spectroscopic and interferometric measurements will allow us to derive the orbital elements, distances, and dynamical masses. Here we focus on recent results using 2- to 6-telescopes beam combiners for the Cepheids X Sgr, T Mon and V1334 Cyg.