• We report on simultaneous X-ray and radio observations of the radio-mode-switching pulsar PSR B1822-09 with ESA's XMM-Newton and the WSRT, GMRT and Lovell radio telescopes. PSR B1822-09 switches between a radio-bright and radio-quiet mode, and we discovered a relationship between the durations of its modes and a known underlying radio-modulation timescale within the modes. We discovered X-ray (energies 0.2-1.4 keV) pulsations with a broad sinusoidal pulse, slightly lagging the radio main pulse in phase by 0.094 +/- 0.017, with an energy-dependent pulsed fraction varying from ~0.15 at 0.3 keV to ~0.6 at 1 keV. No evidence is found for simultaneous X-ray and radio mode switching. The total X-ray spectrum consists of a cool component (T ~ 0.96 x 10^6 K, hot-spot radius R ~ 2.0 km) and a hot component (T ~ 2.2 x 10^6 K, R ~ 100 m). The hot component can be ascribed to the pulsed emission and the cool component to the unpulsed emission. The high-energy characteristics of PSR B1822-09 resemble those of middle-aged pulsars such as PSR B0656+14, PSR B1055-52 and Geminga, including an indication for pulsed high-energy gamma-ray emission in Fermi LAT data. Explanations for the high pulsed fraction seem to require different temperatures at the two poles of this orthogonal rotator, or magnetic anisotropic beaming effects in its strong magnetic field. In the X-ray skymap we found a harder source at only (5.1+/- 0.5 )arcsec from PSR B1822-09, which might be a pulsar wind nebula.
  • We report on simultaneous X-ray and radio observations of the mode-switching pulsar PSR B0943+10 obtained with the XMM-Newton satellite and the LOFAR, LWA and Arecibo radio telescopes in November 2014. We confirm the synchronous X-ray/radio switching between a radio-bright (B) and a radio-quiet (Q) mode, in which the X-ray flux is a factor ~2.4 higher than in the B-mode. We discovered X-ray pulsations, with pulsed fraction of 38+/-5% (0.5-2 keV), during the B-mode, and confirm their presence in Q-mode, where the pulsed fraction increases with energy from ~20% up to ~65% at 2 keV. We found marginal evidence for an increase in the X-ray pulsed fraction during B-mode on a timescale of hours. The Q-mode X-ray spectrum requires a fit with a two-component model (either a power-law plus blackbody or the sum of two blackbodies), while the B-mode spectrum is well fit by a single blackbody (a single power-law is rejected). With a maximum likelihood analysis, we found that in Q-mode the pulsed emission has a thermal blackbody spectrum with temperature ~3.4x10^6 K and the unpulsed emission is a power-law with photon index ~2.5, while during B-mode both the pulsed and unpulsed emission can be fit by either a blackbody or a power law with similar values of temperature and photon index. A Chandra image shows no evidence for diffuse X-ray emission. These results support a scenario in which both unpulsed non-thermal emission, likely of magnetospheric origin, and pulsed thermal emission from a small polar cap (~1500 m^2) with a strong non-dipolar magnetic field (~10^{14} G), are present during both radio modes and vary in intensity in a correlated way. This is broadly consistent with the predictions of the partially screened gap model and does not necessarily imply global magnetospheric rearrangements to explain the mode switching.
  • This is a White Paper in support of the mission concept of the Large Observatory for X-ray Timing (LOFT), proposed as a medium-sized ESA mission. We discuss the potential of LOFT for the study of magnetospheres of isolated neutron stars. For a summary, we refer to the paper.
  • During the last 10 years, INTEGRAL made a unique contribution to the study of accreting millisecond X-ray pulsars (AMXPs), discovering three of the 14 sources now known of this class. Besides increasing the number of known AMXPs, INTEGRAL also carried out observations of these objects above 20 keV, substantially advancing our understanding of their behaviour. We present here a review of all the AMXPs observed with INTEGRAL and discuss the physical interpretation of their behaviour in the X-ray domain. We focus in particular on the lightcurve profile during outburst, as well as the timing, spectral, and thermonuclear type-I X-ray bursts properties.
  • Pulsars emit low-frequency radio waves through to high-energy gamma-rays that are generated anywhere from the surface out to the edges of the magnetosphere. Detecting correlated mode changes in the multi-wavelength emission is therefore key to understanding the physical relationship between these emission sites. Through simultaneous observations, we have detected synchronous switching in the radio and X-ray emission properties of PSR B0943+10. When the pulsar is in a sustained radio 'bright' mode, the X-rays show only an un-pulsed, non-thermal component. Conversely, when the pulsar is in a radio 'quiet' mode, the X-ray luminosity more than doubles and a 100%-pulsed thermal component is observed along with the non-thermal component. This indicates rapid, global changes to the conditions in the magnetosphere, which challenge all proposed pulsar emission theories.
  • We analyze the spectral and timing properties of IGR J17498-2921 and the characteristics of X-ray bursts to constrain the physical processes responsible for the X-ray production in this class of sources. The broad-band average spectrum is well-described by thermal Comptonization with an electron temperature of kT_e ~ 50 keV, soft seed photons of kT_bb ~ 1 keV, and Thomson optical depth \taut ~ 1 in a slab geometry. The slab area corresponds to a black body radius of R_bb ~9 km. During the outburst, the spectrum stays remarkably stable with plasma and soft seed photon temperatures and scattering optical depth that are constant within the errors. This behavior has been interpreted as indicating that the X-ray emission originates above the neutron star (NS) surface in a hot slab (either the heated NS surface or the accretion shock). The INTEGRAL, RXTE, and Swift data reveal the X-ray pulsation at a period of 2.5 milliseconds up to ~65 keV. The pulsed fraction is consistent with being constant, i.e. energy independent and has a typical value of 6-7%. The nearly sinusoidal pulses show soft lags that seem to saturate near 10 keV at a rather small value of ~ -60\mu s with those observed in other accreting pulsars. The short burst profiles indicate that there is a hydrogen-poor material at ignition, which suggests either that the accreted material is hydrogen-deficient, or that the CNO metallicity is up to a factor of about two times solar. However, the variation in the burst recurrence time as a function of \dot{m} (inferred from the X-ray flux) is much smaller than predicted by helium-ignition models.
  • We propose to perform a continuously scanning all-sky survey from 200 keV to 80 MeV achieving a sensitivity which is better by a factor of 40 or more compared to the previous missions in this energy range. The Gamma-Ray Imaging, Polarimetry and Spectroscopy (GRIPS) mission addresses fundamental questions in ESA's Cosmic Vision plan. Among the major themes of the strategic plan, GRIPS has its focus on the evolving, violent Universe, exploring a unique energy window. We propose to investigate $\gamma$-ray bursts and blazars, the mechanisms behind supernova explosions, nucleosynthesis and spallation, the enigmatic origin of positrons in our Galaxy, and the nature of radiation processes and particle acceleration in extreme cosmic sources including pulsars and magnetars. The natural energy scale for these non-thermal processes is of the order of MeV. Although they can be partially and indirectly studied using other methods, only the proposed GRIPS measurements will provide direct access to their primary photons. GRIPS will be a driver for the study of transient sources in the era of neutrino and gravitational wave observatories such as IceCUBE and LISA, establishing a new type of diagnostics in relativistic and nuclear astrophysics. This will support extrapolations to investigate star formation, galaxy evolution, and black hole formation at high redshifts.
  • J.W. den Herder, L. Piro, T. Ohashi, C. Kouveliotou, D.H. Hartmann, J.S. Kaastra, L. Amati, M.I. Andersen, M. Arnaud, J-L. Attéia, S. Bandler, M. Barbera, X. Barcons, S. Barthelmy, S. Basa, S. Basso, M. Boer, E. Branchini, G. Branduardi-Raymont, S. Borgani, A. Boyarsky, G. Brunetti, C. Budtz-Jorgensen, D. Burrows, N. Butler, S. Campana, E. Caroli, M. Ceballos, F. Christensen, E. Churazov, A. Comastri, L. Colasanti, R. Cole, R. Content, A. Corsi, E. Costantini, P. Conconi, G. Cusumano, J. de Plaa, A. De Rosa, M. Del Santo, S. Di Cosimo, M. De Pasquale, R. Doriese, S. Ettori, P. Evans, Y. Ezoe, L. Ferrari, H. Finger, T. Figueroa-Feliciano, P. Friedrich, R. Fujimoto, A. Furuzawa, J. Fynbo, F. Gatti, M. Galeazzi, N. Gehrels, B. Gendre, G. Ghirlanda, G. Ghisellini, M. Gilfanov, P. Giommi, M. Girardi, J. Grindlay, M. Cocchi, O. Godet, M. Guedel, F. Haardt, R. den Hartog, I. Hepburn, W. Hermsen, J. Hjorth, H. Hoekstra, A. Holland, A. Hornstrup, A. van der Horst, A. Hoshino, J. in 't Zand, K. Irwin, Y. Ishisaki, P. Jonker, T. Kitayama, H. Kawahara, N. Kawai, R. Kelley, C. Kilbourne, P. de Korte, A. Kusenko, I. Kuvvetli, M. Labanti, C. Macculi, R. Maiolino, M. Mas Hesse, K. Matsushita, P. Mazzotta, D. McCammon, M. Méndez, R. Mignani, T. Mineo, K. Mitsuda, R. Mushotzky, S. Molendi, L. Moscardini, L. Natalucci, F. Nicastro, P. O'Brien, J. Osborne, F. Paerels, M. Page, S. Paltani, K. Pedersen, E. Perinati, T. Ponman, E. Pointecouteau, P. Predehl, S. Porter, A. Rasmussen, G. Rauw, H. Röttgering, M. Roncarelli, P. Rosati, E. Quadrini, O. Ruchayskiy, R. Salvaterra, S. Sasaki, K. Sato, S. Savaglio, J. Schaye, S. Sciortino, M. Shaposhnikov, R. Sharples, K. Shinozaki, D. Spiga, R. Sunyaev, Y. Suto, Y. Takei, N. Tanvir, M. Tashiro, T. Tamura, Y. Tawara, E. Troja, M. Tsujimoto, T. Tsuru, P. Ubertini, J. Ullom, E. Ursino, F. Verbunt, F. van de Voort, M. Viel, S. Wachter, D. Watson, M. Weisskopf, N. Werner, N. White, R. Willingale, R. Wijers, N. Yamasaki, K. Yoshikawa, S. Zane
    ORIGIN is a proposal for the M3 mission call of ESA aimed at the study of metal creation from the epoch of cosmic dawn. Using high-spectral resolution in the soft X-ray band, ORIGIN will be able to identify the physical conditions of all abundant elements between C and Ni to red-shifts of z=10, and beyond. The mission will answer questions such as: When were the first metals created? How does the cosmic metal content evolve? Where do most of the metals reside in the Universe? What is the role of metals in structure formation and evolution? To reach out to the early Universe ORIGIN will use Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) to study their local environments in their host galaxies. This requires the capability to slew the satellite in less than a minute to the GRB location. By studying the chemical composition and properties of clusters of galaxies we can extend the range of exploration to lower redshifts (z ~ 0.2). For this task we need a high-resolution spectral imaging instrument with a large field of view. Using the same instrument, we can also study the so far only partially detected baryons in the Warm-Hot Intergalactic Medium (WHIM). The less dense part of the WHIM will be studied using absorption lines at low redshift in the spectra for GRBs.
  • IGR J17511-3057 is the second X-ray transient accreting millisecond pulsar discovered by INTEGRAL. It was in outburst for about a month from September 13, 2009. The broad-band average spectrum is well described by thermal Comptonization with an electron temperature of kT_e ~ 25 keV, soft seed photons of kT_bb ~ 0.6 keV, and Thomson optical depth \tau_T ~ 2 in a slab geometry. During the outburst the spectrum stays remarkably stable with plasma and soft seed photon temperatures and scattering optical depth being constant within errors. We fitted the outburst profile with the exponential model, and using the disk instability model we inferred the outer disk radius to be (4.8 - 5.4) \times 1010 cm. The INTEGRAL and RXTE data reveal the X-ray pulsation at a period of 4.08 milliseconds up to ~ 120 keV. The pulsed fraction is shown to decrease from ~22% at 3 keV to a constant pulsed fraction of ~17-18% between 7-30 keV, and then to decrease again down to ~13% at 60 keV. The nearly sinusoidal pulses show soft lags monotonically increasing with energy to about 0.2 ms at 10-20 keV similar to those observed in other accreting pulsars. The short burst profiles indicate hydrogen-poor material at ignition, which suggests either that the accreted material is hydrogen-deficient, or that the CNO metallicity is up to a factor of 2 times solar. However, the variation of burst recurrence time as a function of m (inferred from the X-ray flux) is much smaller than predicted by helium-ignition models.
  • Aims: Hete J1900.1-2455 is the seventh known X-ray transient accreting millisecond pulsar and has been in outburst for more than one year. We compared the data on Hete J1900.1-2455 with other similar objects and made an attempt at deriving constraints on the physical processes responsible for a spectral formation. Methods: The broad-band spectrum of the persistent emission in the 2-300 keV energy band and the timing properties were studied using simultaneous INTEGRAL and the publicly available RXTE data obtained in October 2005. The properties of the X-ray bursts observed from Hete J1900.1-2455 were also investigated. Results: The spectrum is well described by a two-component model consisting of a blackbody-like soft X-ray emission at 0.8 keV temperature and a thermal Comptonized spectrum with the electron temperature of 30 keV and Thomson optical depth tau_T ~ 2 for the slab geometry. The source is detected by INTEGRAL up to 200 keV at the luminosity of 5E36 erg/s (assuming a distance of 5 kpc) in the 0.1-200 keV energy band. We have also detected one type I X-ray burst which shows the photospheric radius expansion. The burst occurred at an inferred persistent emission level of ~ 3-4% of the Eddington luminosity. Using the data for all X-ray bursts observed to date from Hete J1900.1-2455, the burst recurrence time is estimated to be about 2 days. No pulsations have been detected either in the RXTE or in the INTEGRAL data which puts interesting constraints on theories of the magnetic field evolution in neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries.
  • We present observations with the INTEGRAL/IBIS telescope of the wind nebula powered by the young pulsar B1509-58 and we discuss the spatial and spectral properties of the unpulsed emission in the 20-200 keV energy band. The source extension and orientation along the northwest-southeast axis corresponds to the jet emission seen at keV and TeV energies. The hard X-ray spectrum is consistent with the earlier Beppo-SAX measurements. It follows a power law with a photon index alpha = -2.12 pm 0.05 up to 160 keV. A possible break at this energy is found at the 2.9 sigma confidence level. The 0.1-100 keV data are consistent with synchrotron aging of pairs in the jet and yield a magnetic field strength of 22-33 muG for a bulk velocity of 0.3-0.5c. The synchrotron cut-off energy thus corresponds to a maximum electron energy of 400-730 TeV.
  • Simultaneous observations of the accretion-powered millisecond pulsar IGR J00291+5934 by International Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory and Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer during the 2004 December outburst are analysed. The average spectrum is well described by thermal Comptonization with an electron temperature of 50 keV and Thomson optical depth tau_T ~ 1 in a slab geometry. The spectral shape is almost constant during the outburst. We detect a spin-up of the pulsar with nudot=8.4x10E-13 Hz/s. The ISGRI data reveal the pulsation of X-rays at a period of 1.67 milliseconds up to ~150 keV. The pulsed fraction is shown to increase from 6 per cent at 6 keV to 12--20 per cent at 100 keV. This is naturally explained by the action of the Doppler effect the exponentially cutoff Comptonization spectrum from the hot spot. The nearly sinusoidal pulses show soft lags with complex energy dependence, increasing up to 7 keV, then decreasing to 15 keV, and seemingly saturating at higher energies.
  • The analysis of an INTEGRAL AO2 observation of the error contours of the EGRET source 3EG J1621+8203 is presented. The only source found inside the error contours for energies between 20 and 30 keV at 5 sigma detection significance is the FR I radio galaxy NGC 6251. This supports the identification of NGC 6251 with 3EG J1621+8203. The observed flux is higher and softer than observed in the past, but consistent with a variable blazar-like spectral energy distribution.
  • The possible identification by INTEGRAL of the EGRET source 3EG J1736-2908 with the active galactic nucleus GRS 1734-292 is discussed. The latter was discovered in 1990 and later identified with a Seyfert 1 galaxy. At the time of the compilation of the 3rd EGRET Catalog, it was not considered as a possible counterpart of the source 3EG J1736-2908, which remained unidentified. A detailed multiwavelength study of the EGRET error circle is presented, by including archival radio, soft- and hard-X observations, suggesting that GRS 1734-292 could be a likely counterpart of 3EG J1736-2908, even though this poses very interesting questions about the production mechanisms of gamma-rays with energies greater than 100 MeV.
  • The primary objective of the study of unidentified EGRET sources with INTEGRAL is to locate with a few arcminute accuracy the hard X-ray / soft gamma-ray counterparts within the EGRET error circle or to determine upper limits on their emission in the INTEGRAL energy range. The INTEGRAL Galactic Plane Scan (GPS) and Galactic Centre Deep Exposure (GCDE) data have been analysed and cross-correlated with the EGRET 3^rd Catalogue to search for counterparts of EGRET sources. The IBIS detection of a source within the EGRET error circle of 3EG J1736-2908 is presented and its possible identification with the active galaxy GRS 1734-292 is discussed. Finally, preliminary results on the cross-correlation between EGRET unidentified sources and the first data from the IBIS survey of the Galactic Centre are presented.
  • We present timing and spectral results of PSR B1937+21, the fastest known millisecond pulsar (P about 1.56 ms), observed with RXTE. The pulse profile, detected up to 20 keV, shows a double peak with the main component much stronger than the other. The peak phase separation is 0.526 +/- 0.002 and the pulsed spectrum over the energy range 2--25 keV is well described by a power law with a photon index equal to 1.14 +/- 0.07. We find that the X-ray pulses are closely aligned in phase with the giant pulses observed in the radio band. This results suggest that giant radio pulses and X-ray pulses originate in the same region of the magnetosphere due to a high and fluctuating electron density that occasionally emits coherently in the radio band. The X-ray events, however, do not show any clustering in time indicating that no X-ray flares are produced.
  • In this letter we report on the accuracy of the attitude, misalignment, orbit and time correlation which are used to perform scientific analyses of the INTEGRAL data. The boresight attitude during science pointings has an accuracy of 3 arcsec. At the center of the field, the misalignments have been calibrated leading to a location accuracy of 4 to 40 arcsec for the different instruments. The spacecraft position is known within 10 meters. The relative timing between instruments could be reconstructed within 10 microsec and the absolute timing within 40 microsec.
  • We present INTEGRAL and XMM-Newton observations of the prompt gamma-ray emission and the X-ray afterglow of GRB030227, the first GRB for which the quick localization obtained with the INTEGRAL Burst Alert System (IBAS) has led to the discovery of X-ray and optical afterglows. GRB030227 had a duration of about 20 s and a peak flux of 1.1 photons cm^-2 s^-1 in the 20-200 keV energy range. The time averaged spectrum can be fit by a single power law with photon index about 2 and we find some evidence for a hard to soft spectral evolution. The X-ray afterglow has been detected starting only 8 hours after the prompt emission, with a 0.2-10 keV flux decreasing as t^-1 from 1.3x10e-12 to 5x10e-13 erg cm^-2 s^-1. The afterglow spectrum is well described by a power law with photon index 1.94+/-0.05 modified by a redshifted neutral absorber with column density of several 10e22 cm^-2. A possible emission line at 1.67 keV could be due to Fe for a redshift z=3, consistent with the value inferred from the absorption.
  • This article has been withdrawn because it was submitted twice unintentionally.
  • We report on high-resolution spatial and timing results for binary millisecond pulsar PSR J0218+4232 obtained with the Chandra HRC-I and HRC-S in imaging mode. We found no indications for extended emission at 1 arcsec scales. With the HRC-S observation we obtained a 0.08-10 keV pulse profile with high statistics which could be compared in absolute time with the pulse profiles at radio-frequencies and at high-energy gamma-rays. The two X-ray pulses at aligned with 2 of the 3 radio-pulses, and with the 2 gamma-ray pulses.
  • We report results of observations and analyses on the gamma-ray blazar PKS 1622-297, with emphasis on the COMPTEL data (0.75 - 30 MeV) collected between April 1991 and November 1997. PKS 1622-297 was detected as a source of gamma-rays by the EGRET experiment aboard CGRO in 1995 during a gamma-ray outburst at energies above 100 MeV lasting for five weeks. In this time period the blazar was significantly (~ 5.9 sigma) detected by COMPTEL at 10-30 MeV. At lower COMPTEL energies the detection is marginal, resulting in a hard MeV spectrum. The combined COMPTEL/EGRET energy spectrum shows a break at MeV energies. The broad-band spectrum (radio - gamma-rays) shows that the gamma-ray emission dominates the overall power output. On top of the 5-week gamma-ray outburst, EGRET detected a huge flare lasting for > 1 day. Enhanced MeV emission (10 - 30 MeV) is found near the time of this flare, suggesting a possible time delay with respect to the emission above 100 MeV. Outside the 5-week flaring period in 1995, we do not detect MeV emission from PKS 1622-297.
  • We have used observations of Cygnus X-1 from the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory (CGRO) and BeppoSAX to study the variation in the MeV gamma-ray emission between the hard and soft spectral states, using spectra that cover the energy range 20 keV up to 10 MeV. These data provide evidence for significant spectral variability at energies above 1 MeV. In particular, whereas the hard X-ray flux decreases during the soft state, the flux at energies above 1 MeV increases, resulting in a significantly harder gamma-ray spectrum at energies above 1 MeV. This behavior is consistent with the general picture of galactic black hole candidates having two distinct spectral forms at soft gamma-ray energies. These data extend this picture, for the first time, to energies above 1 MeV. We have used two different hybrid thermal/non-thermal Comptonization models to fit broad band spectral data obtained in both the hard and soft spectral states. These fits provide a quantitative estimate of the electron distribution and allow us to probe the physical changes that take place during transitions between the low and high X-ray states. We find that there is a significant increase (by a factor of ~4) in the bolometric luminosity as the source moves from the hard state to the soft state. Furthermore, the presence of a non-thermal tail in the Comptonizing electron distribution provides significant constraints on the magnetic field in the source region.
  • We have analyzed the two blazars of 3C 454.3 and CTA 102 using all available COMPTEL data from 1991 to 1999. In the 10-30 MeV band, emission from the general direction of the sources is found at the 4$\sigma$-level, being consistent with contributions from both sources. Below 10 MeV only 3C 454.3 is significantly detected, with the strongest evidence (5.6 $\sigma$) in the 3-10 MeV band. Significant flux variability is not observed for both sources, while a low emission is seen most of the years in the 3-10 MeV light curve for 3C 454.3. Its time-averaged MeV spectrum suggests a power maximum between 3 to 10 MeV.
  • We have used observations from CGRO to study the variation in the MeV emission of Cygnus X-1 between its low and high X-ray states. These data provide a measurement of the spectral variability above 1 MeV. The high state MeV spectrum is found to be much harder than that of the low state MeV spectrum. In particular, the power-law emission seen at hard X-ray energies in the high state spectrum (with a photon spectral index of 2.6) is found to extend out to at least 5 MeV, with no evidence for any cutoff. Here we present the data and describe our efforts to model both the low state and high state spectra using a hybrid thermal/nonthermal model in which the emission results from the Comptonization of an electron population that consists of both a thermal and nonthermal component.
  • PKS 1622-297 was detected as a source of gamma-rays by the EGRET experiment at energies above 100 MeV during a gamma-ray outburst June and July 1995. We analyzed the COMPTEL data (0.75 - 30 MeV) of this time period to investigate the behaviour of PKS 1622-297 at lower gamma-ray energies. The blazar is significantly (5.7 sigma) detected by COMPTEL at energies above 10 MeV. Below 10 MeV the source is only marginally (3-10 MeV band) or not (below 3 MeV) detected. The summed MeV spectrum shows a 'hard' (alpha < 2, ~ E^(-alpha)) shape and, if combined with the simultaneous EGRET spectrum, a spectral break at MeV energies is indicated. We present the COMPTEL results (light curves, spectra) and compare them to results derived in neighbouring energy bands, in particular to the EGRET one.