• Here we use angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy to study superconductivity that emerges in two extreme cases, from a Fermi liquid phase (LiFeAs) and an incoherent bad-metal phase (FeTe0.55Se0.45). We find that although the electronic coherence can strongly reshape the single-particle spectral function in the superconducting state, it is decoupled from the maximum superconducting pairing amplitude, which shows a universal scaling that is valid for all FeSCs. Our observation excludes pairing scenarios in the BCS and the BEC limit for FeSCs and calls for a universal strong coupling pairing mechanism for the FeSCs.
  • Since the discovery of iron-based superconductors, a number of theories have been put forward to explain the qualitative origin of pairing, but there have been few attempts to make quantitative, material-specific comparisons to experimental results. The spin-fluctuation theory of electronic pairing, based on first-principles electronic structure calculations, makes predictions for the superconducting gap. Within the same framework, the surface wave functions may also be calculated, allowing, e.g., for detailed comparisons between theoretical results and measured scanning tunneling topographs and spectra. Here we present such a comparison between theory and experiment on the Fe-based superconductor LiFeAs. Results for the homogeneous surface as well as impurity states are presented as a benchmark test of the theory. For the homogeneous system, we argue that the maxima of topographic image intensity may be located at positions above either the As or Li atoms, depending on tip height and the setpoint current of the measurement. We further report the experimental observation of transitions between As and Li-registered lattices as functions of both tip height and setpoint bias, in agreement with this prediction. Next, we give a detailed comparison between the simulated scanning tunneling microscopy images of transition-metal defects with experiment. Finally, we discuss possible extensions of the current framework to obtain a theory with true predictive power for scanning tunneling microscopy in Fe-based systems.
  • We generalize the multiband typical medium dynamical cluster approximation and the formalism introduced by Blackman, Esterling and Berk so that it can deal with localization in multiband disordered systems with both diagonal and off-diagonal disorder with complicated potentials. We also introduce a new ansatz for the angle resolved typical density of states that greatly improves the numerical stability of the method while preserving the independence of scattering events at different frequencies. Starting from the first-principles effective Hamiltonian, we apply this method to the diluted magnetic semiconductor Ga$_{1-x}$Mn$_x$N, and find the impurity band is completely localized for Mn concentrations $x<0.03$ while for $0.03 <x<0.10$ the impurity band has delocalized states but the chemical potential resides at or above the mobility edge. So, the system is always insulating within the experimental compositional limit ($x\approx 0.10$) due to Anderson localization. However, for $0.03 <x<0.10$ hole doping could make the system metallic allowing double exchange mediated, or enhanced, ferromagnetism. The developed method is expected to have a large impact on first-principles studies of Anderson localization.
  • In conventional s-wave superconductors, only magnetic impurities exhibit impurity bound states, whereas for an s+- order parameter they can occur for both magnetic and non-magnetic impurities. Impurity bound states in superconductors can thus provide important insight into the order parameter. Here, we present a combined experimental and theoretical study of native and engineered iron-site defects in LiFeAs. Detailed comparison of tunneling spectra measured on impurities with spin fluctuation theory reveals a continuous evolution from negligible impurity bound state features for weaker scattering potential to clearly detectable states for somewhat stronger scattering potentials. All bound states for these intermediate strength potentials are pinned at or close to the gap edge of the smaller gap, a phenomenon that we explain and ascribe to multi-orbital physics.
  • In contrast to conventional superconducting (SC) materials, superconductivity in high-temperature superconductors (HTCs) usually emerges in the presence of other fluctuating orders with similar or higher energy scales, thus instigating debates over their relevance for the SC pairing mechanism. In iron-based superconductors (IBSCs), local orbital fluctuations have been proposed to be directly responsible for the structural phase transition and closely related to the observed giant magnetic anisotropy and electronic nematicity. However, whether superconductivity can emerge from, or even coexist with orbital fluctuations, remains unclear. Here we report the angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) observation of the lifting of symmetry-protected band degeneracy, and consequently the breakdown of local tetragonal symmetry in the SC state of Li(Fe1-xCox)As. Supported by theoretical simulations, we analyse the doping and temperature dependences of this band-splitting and demonstrate an intimate connection between ferro-orbital correlations and superconductivity.
  • We report an unusual persistence of superconductivity against high magnetic fields in the iron chalcogenide film FeTe:O$_{x}$ below ~ 2.5 K. Instead of saturating like a mean-field behavior with a single order parameter, the measured low-temperature upper critical field increases progressively, suggesting a large supply of superconducting states accessible via magnetic field or low-energy thermal fluctuations. We demonstrate that superconducting states of finite momenta can be realized within the conventional theory, despite its questionable applicability. Our findings reveal a fundamental characteristic of superconductivity and electronic structure in the strongly-correlated iron-based superconductors.
  • A direct and element-specific measurement of the local Fe spin moment has been provided by analyzing the Fe 3s core level photoemission spectra in the parent and optimally doped CeFeAsO1-xFx (x = 0, 0.11) and Sr(Fe1 xCox)2As2 (x = 0, 0.10) pnictides. The rapid time scales of the photoemission process allowed the detection of large local spin moments fluctuating on a 10-15 s time scale in the paramagnetic, anti-ferromagnetic and superconducting phases, indicative of the occurrence of ubiquitous strong Hund's magnetic correlations. The magnitude of the spin moment is found to vary significantly among different families, 1.3 \muB in CeFeAsO and 2.1 \muB in SrFe2As2. Surprisingly, the spin moment is found to decrease considerably in the optimally doped samples, 0.9 \muB in CeFeAsO0.89F0.11 and 1.3 \muB in Sr(Fe0.9Co0.1)2As2. The strong variation of the spin moment against doping and material type indicates that the spin moments and the motion of itinerant electrons are influenced reciprocally in a self-consistent fashion, reflecting the strong competition between the antiferromagnetic super-exchange interaction among the spin moments and the kinetic energy gain of the itinerant electrons in the presence of a strong Hund's coupling. By describing the evolution of the magnetic correlations concomitant with the appearance of superconductivity, these results constitute a fundamental step toward attaining a correct description of the microscopic mechanisms shaping the electronic properties in the pnictides, including magnetism and high temperature superconductivity.
  • Combining thermodynamic measurements with theoretical density functional and thermodynamic calculations we demonstrate that the honeycomb lattice iridates A2IrO3 (A = Na, Li) are magnetically ordered Mott insulators where the magnetism of the effective spin-orbital S = 1/2 moments can be captured by a Heisenberg-Kitaev (HK) model with Heisenberg interactions beyond nearest-neighbor exchange. Experimentally, we observe an increase of the Curie-Weiss temperature from \theta = -125 K for Na2IrO3 to \theta = -33 K for Li2IrO3, while the antiferromagnetic ordering temperature remains roughly the same T_N = 15 K for both materials. Using finite-temperature functional renormalization group calculations we show that this evolution of \theta, T_N, the frustration parameter f = \theta/T_N, and the zig-zag magnetic ordering structure suggested for both materials by density functional theory can be captured within this extended HK model. Combining our experimental and theoretical results, we estimate that Na2IrO3 is deep in the magnetically ordered regime of the HK model (\alpha \approx 0.25), while Li2IrO3 appears to be close to a spin-liquid regime (0.6 < \alpha < 0.7).
  • We report a combined experimental and theoretical investigation of the magnetic structure of the honeycomb lattice magnet Na$_2$IrO$_3$, a strong candidate for a realization of a gapless spin-liquid. Using resonant x-ray magnetic scattering at the Ir L$_3$-edge, we find 3D long range antiferromagnetic order below T$_N$=13.3 K. From the azimuthal dependence of the magnetic Bragg peak, the ordered moment is determined to be predominantly along the {\it a}-axis. Combining the experimental data with first principles calculations, we propose that the most likely spin structure is a novel "zig-zag" structure.
  • We present a combined analysis of neutron scattering and photoemission measurements on superconducting FeSe(0.5)Te(0.5). The low-energy magnetic excitations disperse only in the direction transverse to the characteristic wave vector (1/2,0,0), whereas the electronic Fermi surface near (1/2,0,0) appears to consist of four incommensurate pockets. While the spin resonance occurs at an incommensurate wave vector compatible with nesting, neither spin-wave nor Fermi-surface-nesting models can describe the magnetic dispersion. We propose that a coupling of spin and orbital correlations is key to explaining this behavior. If correct, it follows that these nematic fluctuations are involved in the resonance and could be relevant to the pairing mechanism.
  • A new excitation is observed at 201 meV in the doped-hole ladder cuprate Sr$_{14}$Cu$_{24}$O$_{41}$, using ultraviolet resonance Raman scattering with incident light at 3.7 eV polarized along the direction of the rungs. The excitation is found to be of charge nature, with a temperature independent excitation energy, and can be understood via an intra-ladder pair-breaking process. The intensity tracks closely the order parameter of the charge density wave in the ladder (CDW$_L$), but persists above the CDW$_L$ transition temperature ($T_{CDW_L}$), indicating a strong local pairing above $T_{CDW_L}$. The 201 meV excitation vanishes in La$_{6}$Ca$_{8}$Cu$_{24}$O$_{41+\delta}$, and La$_{5}$Ca$_{9}$Cu$_{24}$O$_{41}$ which are samples with no holes in the ladders. Our results suggest that the doped holes in the ladder are composite bosons consisting of paired holons that order below $T_{CDW}$.
  • The importance of covalent bonding for the magnetism of 3d metal complexes was first noted by Pauling in 1931. His point became moot, however, with the success of the ionic picture of Van Vleck, where ligands influence magnetic electrons of 3d ions mainly through electrostatic fields. Anderson's theory of spin superexchange later established that covalency is at the heart of cooperative magnetism in insulators, but its energy scale was believed to be small compared to other inter-ionic interactions and therefore it was considered a small perturbation of the ionic picture. This assertion fails dramatically in copper oxides, which came to prominence following the discovery of high critical temperature superconductors (HTSC). Magnetic interactions in cuprates are remarkably strong and are often considered the origin of the unusually high superconducting transition temperature, Tc. Here we report a detailed survey of magnetic excitations in the one-dimensional cuprate Sr2CuO3 using inelastic neutron scattering (INS). We show that although the experimental dynamical spin structure factor is well described by the model S=1/2 nearest-neighbour Heisenberg Hamiltonian typically used for cuprates, the magnetic intensity is modified dramatically by strong hybridization of Cu 3d states with O p states, showing that the ionic picture of localized 3d Heisenberg spin magnetism is grossly inadequate. Our findings provide a natural explanation for the puzzle of the missing INS magnetic intensity in cuprates and have profound implications for understanding current and future experimental data on these materials.
  • We investigate the physical parameters controlling the low energy screening in carbon nanotubes via electron energy loss spectroscopy and inelastic x-ray scattering. Two plasmon-like features are observed, one near 9 eV (the so-called pi plasmon) and one near 20 eV (the so-called pi+sigma plasmon). At large nanotube diameters, the pi+sigma plasmon energies are found to depend exclusively on the number of walls and not on the radius or chiral vector. The observed shift indicates a change in the strength of the screening and in the effective interaction at inter-atomic distances, and thus this result suggests a mechanism for tuning the properties of the nanotube.
  • We use angle-resolved photoemission to unravel the quasiparticle decoherence process in the high-$T_c$ cuprates. The coherent band is highly renormalized, and the incoherent part manifests itself as a nearly vertical ``dive'' in the $E$-$k$ intensity plot that approaches the bare band bottom. We find that the coherence-incoherence crossover energies in the hole- and electron-doped cuprates are quite different, but scale to their corresponding bare bandwidth. This rules out antiferromagnetic fluctuations as the main source for decoherence. We also observe the coherent band bottom at the zone center, whose intensity is strongly suppressed by the decoherence process. Consequently, the coherent band dispersion for both hole- and electron-doped cuprates is obtained, and is qualitatively consistent with the framework of Gutzwiller projection.
  • A sharp feature in the charge-density excitation spectra of single-crystal MgB$_{2}$, displaying a remarkable cosine-like, periodic energy dispersion with momentum transfer ($q$) along the $c^{*}$-axis, has been observed for the first time by high-resolution non-resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (NIXS). Time-dependent density-functional theory calculations show that the physics underlying the NIXS data is strong coupling between single-particle and collective degrees of freedom, mediated by large crystal local-field effects. As a result, the small-$q$ collective mode residing in the single-particle excitation gap of the B $\pi$ bands reappears periodically in higher Brillouin zones. The NIXS data thus embody a novel signature of the layered electronic structure of MgB$_{2}$.
  • We have performed an angular-resolved photoemission study of underdoped, optimally doped and overdoped Bi$_{2}$Sr$_2$CaCu$_2$O$_{8+x}$ samples using a wide photon energy range (15 - 100 eV). We report a small and broad non-dispersive A$_{1g}$ peak in the energy distribution curves whose intensity scales with doping. We attribute it to a local impurity state similar to the one observed recently by scanning tunneling spectroscopy and identified as the oxygen dopants. Detailed analysis of the resonance profile and comparison with the single-layered Bi$_{2}$Sr$_2$CuO$_{6+x}$ suggest a mixing of this local state with Cu via the apical oxygens.
  • We report the observation of temperature dependent electronic excitations in various manganites utilizing resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) at the Mn K-edge. Excitations were observed between 1.5 and 16 eV with temperature dependence found as high as 10 eV. The change in spectral weight between 1.5 and 5 eV was found to be related to the magnetic order and independent of the conductivity. On the basis of LDA+U and Wannier function calculations, this dependence is associated with intersite d-d excitations. Finally, the connection between the RIXS cross-section and the loss function is addressed.