• We present observations of CO(3-2) and $^{13}$CO(3-2) emission near the supernebula in the dwarf galaxy NGC 5253, which contains one of the best examples of a potential globular cluster in formation. The 0.3" resolution images reveal an unusual molecular cloud, "Cloud D1", coincident with the radio-infrared supernebula. The ~6-pc diameter cloud has a linewidth, $\Delta$ v = 21.7 km/s, that reflects only the gravitational potential of the star cluster residing within it. The corresponding virial mass is 2.5 x 10$^5$ M$_\odot$. The cluster appears to have a top-heavy initial mass function, with $M_{low}$~1-2 M$_\odot$. Cloud D1 is optically thin in CO(3-2) probably because the gas is hot. Molecular gas mass is very uncertain but constitutes < 35% of the dynamical mass within the cloud boundaries. In spite of the presence of an estimated ~1500-2000 O stars within the small cloud, the CO appears relatively undisturbed. We propose that Cloud D1 consists of molecular clumps or cores, possibly star-forming, orbiting with more evolved stars in the core of the giant cluster.
  • IC342 is a nearby, late-type spiral galaxy with a young nuclear star cluster surrounded by several giant molecular clouds. The IC342 nuclear region is similar to the Milky Way and therefore provides an interesting comparison. We explore star formation in the nucleus using radio recombination line (RRL) and continuum emission at 5, 6.7, 33, and 35 GHz with the JVLA. These radio tracers are largely unaffected by dust and therefore sensitive to all of the thermal emission from the ionized gas produced by early-type stars. We resolve two components in the RRL and continuum emission within the nuclear region that lie east and west of the central star cluster. These components are associated both spatially and kinematically with two giant molecular clouds. We model these regions in two ways: a simple model consisting of uniform gas radiating in spontaneous emission, or as a collection of many compact HII regions in non-LTE. The multiple HII region model provides a better fit to the data and predicts many dense (ne ~ 10^4-10^5 cm-3), compact (< 0.1 pc) HII regions. For the whole nuclear region as defined by RRL emission, we estimate a hydrogen ionizing rate of NL ~ 2 x 10^{52} s^{-1}, corresponding to equivalent ~ 2000 O6 stars and a star formation rate of ~ 0.15 Msun/year. We detect radio continuum emission west of the southern molecular mini spiral arm, consistent with trailing spiral arms.
  • Model-independent distance constraints to binary millisecond pulsars (MSPs) are of great value to both the timing observations of the radio pulsars, and multiwavelength observations of their companion stars. Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) astrometry can be employed to provide these model-independent distances with very high precision via the detection of annual geometric parallax. Using the Very Long Baseline Array, we have observed two binary millisecond pulsars, PSR J1022+1001 and J2145-0750, over a two-year period and measured their distances to be 700 +14 -10 pc and 613 +16 -14 pc respectively. We use the well-calibrated distance in conjunction with revised analysis of optical photometry to tightly constrain the nature of their massive (M ~ 0.85 Msun) white dwarf companions. Finally, we show that several measurements of their parallax and proper motion of PSR J1022+1001 and PSR J2145-0750 obtained by pulsar timing array projects are incorrect, differing from the more precise VLBI values by up to 5 sigma. We investigate possible causes for the discrepancy, and find that imperfect modeling of the solar wind is a likely candidate for the timing model errors given the low ecliptic latitude of these two pulsars.
  • We present new JVLA observations of the high-mass cluster-forming region W51A from 2 to 16 GHz with resolution ${\theta}_{fwhm} \approx$ 0.3 - 0.5". The data reveal a wealth of observational results: (1) Currently-forming, very massive (proto-O) stars are traced by o-H2CO $2_{1,1}-2_{1,2}$ emission, suggesting that this line can be used efficiently as a massive protostar tracer. (2) There is a spatially distributed population of $\sim$mJy continuum sources, including hypercompact H ii regions and candidate colliding wind binaries, in and around the W51 proto-clusters. (3) There are two clearly detected protoclusters, W51e and W51 IRS2, that are gas-rich but may have most of their mass in stars within their inner $\sim$ 0.05 pc. The majority of the bolometric luminosity in W51 most likely comes from a third population of OB stars between these clusters. The presence of a substantial population of exposed O-stars coincident with a population of still-forming massive stars, along with a direct measurement of the low mass loss rate via ionized gas outflow from W51 IRS2, together imply that feedback is ineffective at halting star formation in massive protoclusters. Instead, feedback may shut off the large-scale accretion of diffuse gas onto the W51 protoclusters, implying that they are evolving towards a state of gas exhaustion rather than gas expulsion. Recent theoretical models predict gas exhaustion to be a necessary step in the formation of gravitationally bound stellar clusters, and our results provide an observational validation of this process.
  • We present an analysis of physical conditions in the Orion Veil, a largely atomic PDR that lies just in front (about 2 pc) of the Trapezium stars. We have obtained 21 cm HI and 18 cm OH VLA Zeeman effect data. These data yield images of the line-of-sight magnetic field strength Blos in atomic and molecular regions of the Veil. We find Blos is typically -50 to -75 microgauss in the atomic gas across much of the Veil (25" resolution); Blos is -350 microgauss at one position in the molecular gas (40" resolution). The Veil has two principal HI velocity components. Magnetic and kinematical data suggest a close connection between these components. They may represent gas on either side of a shock wave preceding a weak-D ionization front. Magnetic fields in the Veil HI components are 3-5 times stronger than they are elsewhere in the ISM where N(H) and n(H) are comparable. The HI components are magnetically subcritical (magnetically dominated), like the CNM, although they are about 1 dex denser. Strong fields in the Veil HI components may have resulted from low turbulence conditions in the diffuse gas that gave rise to OMC-1. Strong fields may also be related to magnetostatic equilibrium that has developed in the Veil since star formation. We consider the location of the Orion-S molecular core, proposing a location behind the main Orion H+ region.
  • New observations of Sgr A have been carried out with the VLA using the broadband (2 GHz) continuum mode at 5.5 GHz, covering the central 30 pc region of the RBZ at the Galactic center. Using the MS-MFS algorithms in CASA, we have imaged Sgr A with a resolution of 1", achieving an rms 8 $\mu$Jy/beam, and a dynamic range 100,000:1.The radio image is compared with X-ray, CN emission-line and Paschen-$\alpha$ images obtained using Chandra, SMA and HST/NICMOS, respectively. We discuss several prominent radio features. The "Sgr A West Wings" extend 5 pc from the NW and SE tips of the ionized "Mini-spiral" in Sgr A West to positions located 2.9 and 2.4 arc min to the NW and SE of Sgr A*, respectively. The NW wing, along with several other prominent features, including the "NW Streamers", form an elongated radio lobe (NW lobe), oriented nearly perpendicular to the Galactic plane. This radio lobe, with a size of 14.4 pc x 7.3 pc, has a known X-ray counterpart. A row of three thermally emitting rings is observed in the NW lobe. A field containing numerous amorphous radio blobs extends for a distance of ~2 arc min beyond the tip of the SE wing; these features coincide with the SE X-ray lobe. Most of the amorphous radio blobs in the NW and SE lobes have Paschen-$\alpha$ counterparts, suggesting that a shock interaction of ambient gas concentrations with a collimated nuclear wind (outflow) that may be driven by radiation force from the central star cluster within the CND. Finally, we remark on a prominent radio feature located within the shell of the Sgr A East SNR. Because this feature -- the "Sigma Front" -- correlates well in shape and orientation with the nearby edge of the CND, we propose that it is a reflected shock wave resulting from the impact of the Sgr A East blast wave on the CND.
  • We have recently published observations of significant flux density variations at 1.3 cm in HII regions in the star forming regions Sgr B2 Main and North (De Pree et al. 2014). To further study these variations, we have made new 7 mm continuum and recombination line observations of Sgr B2 at the highest possible angular resolution of the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA). We have observed Sgr B2 Main and North at 42.9 GHz and at 45.4 GHz in the BnA configuration (Main) and the A configuration (North). We compare these new data to archival VLA 7 mm continuum data of Sgr B2 Main observed in 2003 and Sgr B2 North observed in 2001. We find that one of the 41 known ultracompact and hypercompact HII regions in Sgr B2 (K2-North) has decreased $\sim$27% in flux density from 142$\pm$14 mJy to 103$\pm$10 mJy (2.3$\sigma$) between 2001 and 2012. A second source, F3c-Main has increased $\sim$30% in flux density from 82$\pm$8 mJy to 107 $\pm$11 mJy (1.8$\sigma$) between 2003 and 2012. F3c-Main was previously observed to increase in flux density at 1.3 cm over a longer time period between 1989 and 2012 (De Pree et al. 2014). An observation of decreasing flux density, such as that observed in K2-North, is particularly significant since such a change is not predicted by the classical hypothesis of steady expansion of HII regions during massive star accretion. Our new observations at 7 mm, along with others in the literature, suggest that the formation of massive stars occurs through time-variable and violent accretion.
  • We report detections of two candidate distant submillimeter galaxies (SMGs), MM J154506.4$-$344318 and MM J154132.7$-$350320, which are discovered in the AzTEC/ASTE 1.1 mm survey toward the Lupus-I star-forming region. The two objects have 1.1 mm flux densities of 43.9 and 27.1 mJy, and have Herschel/SPIRE counterparts as well. The Submillimeter Array counterpart to the former SMG is identified at 890 $\mu$m and 1.3 mm. Photometric redshift estimates using all available data from the mid-infrared to the radio suggest that the redshifts of the two SMGs are $z_{\rm photo} \simeq$ 4-5 and 3, respectively. Near-infrared objects are found very close to the SMGs and they are consistent with low-$z$ ellipticals, suggesting that the high apparent luminosities can be attributed to gravitational magnification. The cumulative number counts at $S_{\rm 1.1mm} \ge 25$ mJy, combined with other two 1.1-mm brightest sources, are $0.70 ^{+0.56}_{-0.34}$ deg$^{-2}$, which is consistent with a model prediction that accounts for flux magnification due to strong gravitational lensing. Unexpectedly, a $z > 3$ SMG and a Galactic dense starless core (e.g., a first hydrostatic core) could be similar in the mid-infrared to millimeter spectral energy distributions and spatial structures at least at $\gtrsim 1"$. This indicates that it is necessary to distinguish the two possibilities by means of broad band photometry from the optical to centimeter and spectroscopy to determine the redshift, when a compact object is identified toward Galactic star-forming regions.
  • We present methods and results from "21-cm Spectral Line Observations of Neutral Gas with the EVLA" (21-SPONGE), a large survey for Galactic neutral hydrogen (HI) absorption with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA). With the upgraded capabilities of the VLA, we reach median root-mean-square (RMS) noise in optical depth of $\sigma_{\tau}=9\times 10^{-4}$ per $0.42\rm\,km\,s^{-1}$ channel for the 31 sources presented here. Upon completion, 21-SPONGE will be the largest HI absorption survey with this high sensitivity. We discuss the observations and data reduction strategies, as well as line fitting techniques. We prove that the VLA bandpass is stable enough to detect broad, shallow lines associated with warm HI, and show that bandpass observations can be combined in time to reduce spectral noise. In combination with matching HI emission profiles from the Arecibo Observatory ($\sim3.5'$ angular resolution), we estimate excitation (or spin) temperatures ($\rm T_s$) and column densities for Gaussian components fitted to sightlines along which we detect HI absorption (30/31). We measure temperatures up to $\rm T_s\sim1500\rm\,K$ for individual lines, showing that we can probe the thermally unstable interstellar medium (ISM) directly. However, we detect fewer of these thermally unstable components than expected from previous observational studies. We probe a wide range in column density between $\sim10^{16}$ and $>10^{21}\rm\,cm^{-2}$ for individual HI clouds. In addition, we reproduce the trend between cold gas fraction and average $\rm T_s$ found by synthetic observations of a hydrodynamic ISM simulation by Kim et al. (2014). Finally, we investigate methods for estimating HI $\rm T_s$ and discuss their biases.
  • We use MERLIN, VLA and VLBA observations of Galactic \HI absorption towards 3C~138 to estimate the structure function of the \HI opacity fluctuations at AU scales. Using Monte Carlo simulations, we show that there is likely to be a significant bias in the estimated structure function at signal-to-noise ratios characteristic of our observations, if the structure function is constructed in the manner most commonly used in the literature. We develop a new estimator that is free from this bias and use it to estimate the true underlying structure function slope on length scales ranging $5$ to $40$~AU. From a power law fit to the structure function, we derive a slope of $0.81^{+0.14}_{-0.13}$, i.e. similar to the value observed at parsec scales. The estimated upper limit for the amplitude of the structure function is also consistent with the measurements carried out at parsec scales. Our measurements are hence consistent with the \HI opacity fluctuation in the Galaxy being characterized by a power law structure function over length scales that span six orders of magnitude. This result implies that the dissipation scale has to be smaller than a few AU if the fluctuations are produced by turbulence. This inferred smaller dissipation scale implies that the dissipation occurs either in (i) regions with densities $\gtrsim 10^3 $cm$^-3$ (i.e. similar to that inferred for "tiny scale" atomic clouds or (ii) regions with a mix of ionized and atomic gas (i.e. the observed structure in the atomic gas has a magneto-hydrodynamic origin).
  • We present a new algorithm, named Autonomous Gaussian Decomposition (AGD), for automatically decomposing spectra into Gaussian components. AGD uses derivative spectroscopy and machine learning to provide optimized guesses for the number of Gaussian components in the data, and also their locations, widths, and amplitudes. We test AGD and find that it produces results comparable to human-derived solutions on 21cm absorption spectra from the 21cm SPectral line Observations of Neutral Gas with the EVLA (21-SPONGE) survey. We use AGD with Monte Carlo methods to derive the HI line completeness as a function of peak optical depth and velocity width for the 21-SPONGE data, and also show that the results of AGD are stable against varying observational noise intensity. The autonomy and computational efficiency of the method over traditional manual Gaussian fits allow for truly unbiased comparisons between observations and simulations, and for the ability to scale up and interpret the very large data volumes from the upcoming Square Kilometer Array and pathfinder telescopes.
  • We present images of C110$\alpha$ and H110$\alpha$ radio recombination line (RRL) emission at 4.8 GHz and images of H166$\alpha$, C166$\alpha$ and X166$\alpha$ RRL emission at 1.4 GHz, observed toward the starforming region NGC 2024. The 1.4 GHz image with angular resolution $\sim$ 70\arcsec\ is obtained using VLA data. The 4.8 GHz image with angular resolution $\sim$ 17\arcsec\ is obtained by combining VLA and GBT data. The similarity of the LSR velocity (10.3 \kms\) of the C110$\alpha$ line to that of lines observed from molecular material located at the far side of the \HII\ region suggests that the photo dissociation region (PDR) responsible for C110$\alpha$ line emission is at the far side. The LSR velocity of C166$\alpha$ is 8.8 \kms. This velocity is comparable with the velocity of molecular absorption lines observed from the foreground gas, suggesting that the PDR is at the near side of the \HII\ region. Non-LTE models for carbon line forming regions are presented. Typical properties of the foreground PDR are $T_{PDR} \sim 100$ K, $n_e^{PDR} \sim 5$ \cmthree, $n_H \sim 1.7 \times 10^4$ \cmthree, path length $l \sim 0.06$ pc and those of the far side PDR are $T_{PDR} \sim$ 200 K, $n_e^{PDR} \sim$ 50 \cmthree, $n_H \sim 1.7 \times 10^5$ \cmthree, $l \sim$ 0.03 pc. Our modeling indicates that the far side PDR is located within the \HII\ region. We estimate magnetic field strength in the foreground PDR to be 60 $\mu$G and that in the far side PDR to be 220 $\mu$G. Our field estimates compare well with the values obtained from OH Zeeman observations toward NGC 2024.
  • Supernovae provide a backdrop from which we can probe the end state of stellar evolution in the final years before the progenitor star explodes. As the shock from the supernova expands, the timespan of mass loss history we are able to probe also extends, providing insight to rapid time-scale processes that govern the end state of massive stars. While supernovae transition into remnants on timescales of decades to centuries, observations of this phase are currently limited. Here we present observations of SN 1970G, serendipitously observed during the monitoring campaign of SN 2011fe that shares the same host galaxy. Utilizing the new Jansky Very Large Array upgrade and a deep X-ray exposure taken by the Chandra Space Telescope, we are able to recover this middle-aged supernova and distinctly resolve it from the HII cloud with which it is associated. We find that the flux density of SN 1970G has changed significantly since it was last observed - the X-ray luminosity has increased by a factor of ~3, while we observe a significantly lower radio flux of only 27.5 micro-Jy at 6.75 GHz, a level only detectable through the upgrades now in operation at the Jansky Very Large Array. These changes suggest that SN 1970G has entered a new stage of evolution towards a supernova remnant, and we may be detecting the turn-on of the pulsar wind nebula. Deep radio observations of additional middle-aged supernovae with the improved radio facilities will provide a statistical census of the delicate transition period between supernova and remnant.
  • We present new Very Large Array 6cm H2CO observations toward four extragalactic radio continuum sources (B0212+735, 3C111, NRAO150, BL Lac) to explore the structure of foreground Galactic clouds as revealed by absorption variability. This project adds a new epoch in the monitoring observations of the sources reported by Marscher and collaborators in the mid 1990's. Our new observations confirm the monotonic increase in H$_2$CO absorption strength toward NRAO150. We do not detect significant variability of our 2009 spectra with respect to the 1994 spectra of 3C111, B0212+735 and BL Lac; however we find significant variability of the 3C111 2009 spectrum with respect to archive observations conducted in 1991 and 1992. Our analysis supports that changes in absorption lines could be caused by chemical and/or geometrical gradients in the foreground clouds, and not necessarily by small scale (~10 AU) high density molecular clumps within the clouds.
  • We use the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) to conduct a high-sensitivity survey of neutral hydrogen (HI) absorption in the Milky Way. In combination with corresponding HI emission spectra obtained mostly with the Arecibo Observatory, we detect a widespread warm neutral medium (WNM) component with excitation temperature <Ts>= 7200 (+1800,-1200) K (68% confidence). This temperature lies above theoretical predictions based on collisional excitation alone, implying that Ly-{\alpha} scattering, the most probable additional source of excitation, is more important in the interstellar medium (ISM) than previously assumed. Our results demonstrate that HI absorption can be used to constrain the Ly-{\alpha} radiation field, a critical quantity for studying the energy balance in the ISM and intergalactic medium yet notoriously difficult to model because of its complicated radiative transfer, in and around galaxies nearby and at high redshift.
  • Accretion flows onto massive stars must transfer mass so quickly that they are themselves gravitationally unstable, forming dense clumps and filaments. These density perturbations interact with young massive stars, emitting ionizing radiation, alternately exposing and confining their HII regions. As a result, the HII regions are predicted to flicker in flux density over periods of decades to centuries rather than increasing monotonically in size as predicted by simple Spitzer solutions. We have recently observed the Sgr B2 region at 1.3 cm with the VLA in its three hybrid configurations (DnC, CnB and BnA) at a resolution of 0.25''. These observations were made to compare in detail with matched continuum observations from 1989. At 0.25'' resolution, Sgr B2 contains 41 UC HII regions, 6 of which are hypercompact. The new observations of Sgr B2 allow comparison of relative peak flux densites for the HII regions in Sgr B2 over a 23 year time baseline (1989-2012) in one of the most source-rich massive star forming regions in the Milky Way. The new 1.3 cm continuum images indicate that four of the 41 UC HII regions exhibit significant changes in their peak flux density, with one source (K3) dropping in peak flux density, and the other 3 sources (F10.303, F1 and F3) increasing in peak flux density. The results are consistent with statistical predictions from simulations of high mass star formation, suggesting that they offer a solution to the lifetime problem for ultracompact HII regions.
  • Based on our deep image of Sgr A using broadband data observed with the Jansky VLA at 6 cm, we present a new perspective of the radio bright zone at the Galactic center. We further show the radio detection of the X-ray Cannonball, a candidate neutron star associated with the Galactic center SNR Sgr A East. The radio image is compared with the Chandra X-ray image to show the detailed structure of the radio counterparts of the bipolar X-ray lobes. The bipolar lobes are likely produced by the winds from the activities within Sgr A West, which could be collimated by the inertia of gas in the CND, or by the momentum driving of Sgr A*; and the poloidal magnetic fields likely play an important role in the collimation. The less-collimated SE lobe, in comparison to the NW one, is perhaps due to the fact that the Sgr A East SN might have locally reconfigured the magnetic field toward negative galactic latitudes. In agreement with the X-ray observations, the time-scale of ~ $1\times10^4$ yr estimated for the outermost radio ring appears to be comparable to the inferred age of the Sgr A East SNR.
  • We report the VLA detection of the radio counterpart of the X-ray object referred to as the "Cannonball", which has been proposed to be the remnant neutron star resulting from the creation of the Galactic Center supernova remnant, Sagittarius A East. The radio object was detected both in our new VLA image from observations in 2012 at 5.5 GHz and in archival VLA images from observations in 1987 at 4.75 GHz and in the period from 1990 to 2002 at 8.31 GHz. The radio morphology of this object is characterized as a compact, partially resolved point source located at the northern tip of a radio "tongue" similar to the X-ray structure observed by Chandra. Behind the Cannonball, a radio counterpart to the X-ray plume is observed. This object consists of a broad radio plume with a size of 30\arcsec$\times$15\arcsec, followed by a linear tail having a length of 30\arcsec. The compact head and broad plume sources appear to have relatively flat spectra ($\propto\nu^\alpha$) with mean values of $\alpha=-0.44\pm0.08$ and $-0.10\pm0.02$, respectively; and the linear tail shows a steep spectrum with the mean value of $-1.94\pm0.05$. The total radio luminosity integrated from these components is $\sim8\times10^{33}$ erg s$^{-1}$, while the emission from the head and tongue amounts for only $\sim1.5\times10^{31}$ erg s$^{-1}$. Based on the images obtained from the two epochs' observations at 5 GHz, we infer the proper motion of the object: $\mu_\alpha = 0.001 \pm0.003$ arcsec yr$^{-1}$ and $\mu_\delta = 0.013 \pm0.003$ arcsec yr$^{-1}$. With an implied velocity of 500 km s$^{-1}$, a plausible model can be constructed in which a runaway neutron star surrounded by a pulsar wind nebula was created in the event that produced Sgr A East. The inferred age of this object, assuming that its origin coincides with the center of Sgr A East, is approximately 9000 years.
  • Our analysis of a VLBA 12-hour synthesis observation of the OH masers in a well-known star-forming region W49N has yielded valuable data that enables us to probe distributions of magnetic fields in both the maser columns and the intervening interstellar medium (ISM). The data consisting of detailed high angular-resolution images (with beam-width ~20 milli-arc-seconds) of several dozen OH maser sources or "spots", at 1612, 1665 and 1667 MHz, reveal anisotropic scatter broadening, with typical sizes of a few tens of milli-arc-seconds and axial ratios between 1.5 to 3. Such anisotropies have been reported earlier by Desai, Gwinn & Diamond (1994) and interpreted as induced by the local magnetic field parallel to the Galactic plane. However, we find a) the apparent angular sizes on the average a factor of ~2.5 less than those reported by Desai et al. (1994), indicating significantly less scattering than inferred earlier, and b) a significant deviation in the average orientation of the scatter-broadened images (by ~10 degrees) from that implied by the magnetic field in the Galactic plane. More intriguingly, for a few Zeeman pairs in our set, significant differences (up to 6 sigma) are apparent in the scatter broadened images for the two hands of circular polarization, even when apparent velocity separation is less than 0.1 km/s. This may possibly be the first example of a Faraday rotation contribution to the diffractive effects in the ISM. Using the Zeeman pairs, we also study the distribution of magnetic field in the W49N complex, finding no significant trend in the spatial structure function. In this paper, we present the details of our observations and analysis leading to these findings, discuss implications of our results for the intervening anisotropic magneto-ionic medium, and suggest the possible implications for the structure of magnetic fields within this star-forming region.
  • We present HI 21cm observations of the Orion Nebula, obtained with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array, at an angular resolution of 7.2"x5.7" and a velocity resolution of 0.77 km/s. Our data reveal HI absorption towards the radio continuum of the HII region, and HI emission arising from the Orion Bar photon-dominated region (PDR) and from the Orion-KL outflow. In the Orion Bar PDR, the HI signal peaks in the same layer as the H2 near-infrared vibrational line emission, in agreement with models of the photodissociation of H2. The gas temperature in this region is approximately 540K, and the HI abundance in the interclump gas in the PDR is 5-10% of the available hydrogen nuclei. Most of the gas in this region therefore remains molecular. Mechanical feedback on the Veil manifests itself through the interaction of ionized flow systems in the Orion Nebula, in particular the Herbig-Haro object HH202, with the Veil. These interactions give rise to prominent blueward velocity shifts of the gas in the Veil. The unambiguous evidence for interaction of this flow system with the Veil shows that the distance between the Veil and the Trapezium stars needs to be revised downwards to about 0.4pc. The depth of the ionized cavity is about 0.7pc, which is much smaller than the depth and the lateral extent of the Veil. Our results reaffirm the blister model for the M42 HII region, while also revealing its relation to the neutral environment on a larger scale.
  • Our analysis of a VLBA 12-hour synthesis observations of the OH masers in W49N has provided detailed high angular-resolution images of the maser sources, at 1612, 1665 and 1667 MHz. The images, of several dozens of spots, reveal anisotropic scatter broadening; with typical sizes of a few tens of milli-arc-seconds and axial ratios between 1.5 to 3. The image position angles oriented perpendicular to the galactic plane are interpreted in terms of elongation of electron-density irregularities parallel to the galactic plane, due to a similarly aligned local magnetic field. However, we find the apparent angular sizes on the average a factor of 2.5 less than those reported by Desai et al., indicating significantly less scattering than inferred earlier. The average position angle of the scattered broadened images is also seen to deviate significantly (by about 10 degrees) from that implied by the magnetic field in the Galactic plane. More intriguingly, for a few Zeeman pairs in our set, we find significant differences in the scatter broadened images for the two hands of polarization, even when apparent velocity separation is less than 0.1 km/s. Here we present the details of our observations and analysis, and discuss the interesting implications of our results for the intervening anisotropic magneto-ionic medium, as well as a comparison with the expectations based on earlier work.
  • The structure function of opacity fluctuations is a useful statistical tool to study tiny scale structures of neutral hydrogen. Here we present high resolution observation of HI absorption towards 3C 138, and estimate the structure function of opacity fluctuations from the combined VLA, MERLIN and VLBA data. The angular scales probed in this work are ~ 10-200 milliarcsec (about 5-100 AU). The structure function in this range is found to be well represented by a power law S_tau(x) ~ x^{beta} with index beta ~ 0.33 +/- 0.07 corresponding to a power spectrum P_tau(U) ~ U^{-2.33}. This is slightly shallower than the earlier reported power law index of ~ 2.5-3.0 at ~ 1000 AU to few pc scales. The amplitude of the derived structure function is a factor of ~ 20-60 times higher than the extrapolated amplitude from observation of Cas A at larger scales. On the other hand, extrapolating the AU scale structure function for 3C 138 predicts the observed structure function for Cas A at the pc scale correctly. These results clearly establish that the atomic gas has significantly more structures in AU scales than expected from earlier pc scale observations. Some plausible reasons are identified and discussed here to explain these results. The observational evidence of a shallower slope and the presence of rich small scale structures may have implications for the current understanding of the interstellar turbulence.
  • We present high angular resolution continuum observations of the high-mass protostar NGC 7538S with BIMA and CARMA at 3 and 1.4 mm, VLA observations at 1.3, 2, 3.5 and 6 cm, and archive IRAC observations from the Spitzer Space Observatory, which detect the star at 4.5, 5.8, and 8 $\mu$m. The star looks rather unremarkable in the mid-IR. The excellent positional agreement of the IRAC source with the VLA free-free emission, the OH, CH$_3$OH, H$_2$O masers, and the dust continuum confirms that this is the most luminous object in the NGC 7538S core. The continuum emission at millimeter wavelengths is dominated by dust emission from the dense cold cloud core surrounding the protostar. Including all array configurations, the emission is dominated by an elliptical source with a size of ~ 8" x 3". If we filter out the extended emission we find three compact mm-sources inside the elliptical core. The strongest one, $S_A$, coincides with the VLA/IRAC source and resolves into a double source at 1.4 mm, where we have sub-arcsecond resolution. The measured spectral index, $\alpha$, between 3 and 1.4 mm is ~ 2.3, and steeper at longer wavelengths, suggesting a low dust emissivity or that the dust is optically thick. We argue that the dust in these accretion disks is optically thick and estimate a mass of an accretion disk or infalling envelope surrounding S$_A$ to be ~ 60 solar masses.
  • Obtaining pulsar parallaxes via relative astrometry (also known as differential astrometry) yields distances and transverse velocities that can be used to probe properties of the pulsar population and the interstellar medium. Large programs are essential to obtain the sample sizes necessary for these population studies, but they must be efficiently conducted to avoid requiring an infeasible amount of observing time. This paper describes the PSRPI astrometric program, including the use of new features in the DiFX software correlator to efficiently locate calibrator sources, selection and observing strategies for a sample of 60 pulsars, initial results, and likely science outcomes. Potential applications of high-precision relative astrometry to measure source structure evolution in defining sources of the International Celestial Referent Frame are also discussed.
  • The star-forming region W75N hosts bright OH masers that are observed to be variable. We present observations taken in 2008 of the ground-state OH maser transitions with the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) and the Multi-Element Radio-Linked Interferometer Network (MERLIN) and with the Nancay Radio Telescope in 2011. Several of the masers in W75N were observed to be flaring, with the brightest 1720-MHz maser in excess of 400 Jy. The 1720-MHz masers appear to be associated with the continuum source VLA 1, unlike the bright flaring 1665- and 1667-MHz masers, which are associated with VLA 2. The 1720-MHz masers are located in an outflow traced by water masers and are indicative of very dense molecular material near the H II region. The magnetic field strengths are larger in the 1720-MHz maser region than in most regions hosting only main-line OH masers. The density falls off along the outflow, and the order of appearance of different transitions of OH masers is consistent with theoretical models. The 1665- and 1667-MHz VLBA data are compared against previous epochs over a time baseline of over 7 years. The median maser motion is 3.5 km/s, with a scatter that is comparable to thermal turbulence. The general pattern of maser proper motions observed in the 1665- and 1667-MHz transitions is consistent with previous observations.