• We present high-precision spectro-polarimetric data with high spatial resolution (0.4$''$) of the very quiet Sun at 1.56$\mu$m obtained with the GREGOR telescope to shed some light on this complex magnetism. Half of our observed quiet-Sun region is better explained by magnetic substructure within the resolution element. However, we cannot distinguish whether this substructure comes from gradients of the physical parameters along the line of sight or from horizontal gradients (across the surface). In these pixels, a model with two magnetic components is preferred, and we find two distinct magnetic field populations. The population with the larger filling factor has very weak ($\sim$150 G) horizontal fields similar to those obtained in previous works. We demonstrate that the field vector of this population is not constrained by the observations, given the spatial resolution and polarimetric accuracy of our data. The topology of the other component with the smaller filling factor is constrained by the observations for field strengths above 250 G: we infer hG fields with inclinations and azimuth values compatible with an isotropic distribution. The filling factors are typically below 30\%. We also find that the flux of the two polarities is not balanced. From the other half of the observed quiet-Sun area $\sim$50\% are two-lobed Stokes $V$ profiles, meaning that 23\% of the field of view can be adequately explained with a single constant magnetic field embedded in a non-magnetic atmosphere. The magnetic field vector and filling factor are reliable inferred in only 50\% based on the regular profiles. Therefore, 12\% of the field of view harbour hG fields with filling factors typically below 30\%. At our present spatial resolution, 70\% of the pixels apparently are non-magnetised.
  • In sunspot umbrae, convection is largely suppressed by the strong magnetic field. Previous measurements reported on negligible convective flows in umbral cores. Based on this, numerous studies have taken the umbra as zero reference to calculate Doppler velocities of the ambient active region. To clarify the amount of convective motion in the darkest part of umbrae, we directly measured Doppler velocities with an unprecedented accuracy and precision. We performed spectroscopic observations of sunspot umbrae with the Laser Absolute Reference Spectrograph (LARS) at the German Vacuum Tower Telescope. A laser frequency comb enabled the calibration of the high-resolution spectrograph and absolute wavelength positions. A thorough spectral calibration, including the measurement of the reference wavelength, yielded Doppler shifts of the spectral line Ti i 5713.9 {\AA} with an uncertainty of around 5 m s-1. The measured Doppler shifts are a composition of umbral convection and magneto-acoustic waves. For the analysis of convective shifts, we temporally average each sequence to reduce the superimposed wave signal. Compared to convective blueshifts of up to -350 m s-1 in the quiet Sun, sunspot umbrae yield a strongly reduced convective blueshifts around -30 m s-1. {W}e find that the velocity in a sunspot umbra correlates significantly with the magnetic field strength, but also with the umbral temperature defining the depth of the titanium line. The vertical upward motion decreases with increasing field strength. Extrapolating the linear approximation to zero magnetic field reproduces the measured quiet Sun blueshift. Simply taking the sunspot umbra as a zero velocity reference for the calculation of photospheric Dopplergrams can imply a systematic velocity error.
  • We observed an arch filament system (AFS) in a sunspot group with the GREGOR Infrared Spectrograph attached to the GREGOR solar telescope. The AFS was located between the leading sunspot of negative polarity and several pores of positive polarity forming the following part of the sunspot group. We recorded five spectro-polarimetric scans of this region. The spectral range included the spectral lines Si I 1082.7 nm, He I 1083.0 nm, and Ca I 1083.9 nm. In this work we concentrate on the silicon line which is formed in the upper photosphere. The line profiles are inverted with the code `Stokes Inversion based on Response functions' to obtain the magnetic field vector. The line-of-sight velocities are determined independently with a Fourier phase method. Maximum velocities are found close to the ends of AFS fibrils. These maximum values amount to 2.4 km/s next to the pores and to 4 km/s at the sunspot side. Between the following pores, we encounter an area of negative polarity that is decreasing during the five scans. We interpret this by new emerging positive flux in this area canceling out the negative flux. In summary, our findings confirm the scenario that rising magnetic flux tubes cause the AFS.
  • The material class of rare earth nickelates with high Ni$^{3+}$ oxidation state is generating continued interest due to the occurrence of a metal-insulator transition with charge order and the appearance of non-collinear magnetic phases within this insulating regime. The recent theoretical prediction for superconductivity in LaNiO$_3$ thin films has also triggered intensive research efforts. LaNiO$_3$ seems to be the only rare earth nickelate that stays metallic and paramagnetic down to lowest temperatures. So far, centimetre-sized impurity-free single crystal growth has not been reported for the rare earth nickelates material class since elevated oxygen pressures are required for their synthesis. Here, we report on the successful growth of centimetre-sized LaNiO$_3$ single crystals by the floating zone technique at oxygen pressures of up to 150 bar. Our crystals are essentially free from Ni$^{2+}$ impurities and exhibit metallic properties together with an unexpected but clear antiferromagnetic transition.
  • LARS is an Absolute Reference Spectrograph designed for ultra-precise solar observations. The high-resolution echelle spectrograph of the Vacuum Tower Telescope is supported by a state-of-the-art laser frequency comb to calibrate the solar spectrum on an absolute wavelength scale. In this article, we describe the scientific instrument and focus on the upgrades in the last two years to turn the prototype into a turn-key system. The pursued goal was to improve the short-term and long-term stability of the systems, and enable a user-friendly and more versatile operation of the instrument. The first upgrade involved the modernization of the frequency comb. The Fabry-Perot cavities were adjusted to filter to a repetition frequency of 8GHz. A technologically matured photonic crystal fiber was implemented for spectral broadening. The second, quite recent upgrade was performed on the optics feeding the sunlight into a single-mode fiber connected to the spectrograph. A motorized translation stage was deployed to allow the automated selection of three different fields-of-view with diameters of 1", 3", and 10" for the analysis of the solar spectrum. The successful upgrades allow for long-term observations of up to several hours per day with a stable spectral accuracy of 1 m/s limited by the spectrograph. Stable, user-friendly operation of the instrument is supported. The selection of the pre-aligned fiber to change the field of view can now be done within seconds. LARS offers the possibility to observe absolute wavelength positions of spectral lines and Doppler velocities in the solar atmosphere. First results demonstrate the capabilities of the instrument for solar science. The accurate measurement of the solar convection, p-modes, and atmospheric waves will enhance our knowledge of the solar atmosphere and its physical conditions to improve current atmospheric models.
  • Major mergers are considered to be a significant source of turbulence in clusters. We performed a numerical simulation of a major merger event using nested-grid initial conditions, adaptive mesh refinement, radiative cooling of primordial gas, and a homogeneous ultraviolet background. By calculating the microscopic viscosity on the basis of various theoretical assumptions and estimating the Kolmogorov length from the turbulent dissipation rate computed with a subgrid-scale model, we are able to demonstrate that most of the warm-hot intergalactic medium can sustain a fully turbulent state only if the magnetic suppression of the viscosity is considerable. Accepting this as premise, it turns out that ratios of turbulent and thermal quantities change only little in the course of the merger. This confirms the tight correlations between the mean thermal and non-thermal energy content for large samples of clusters in earlier studies, which can be interpreted as second self-similarity on top of the self-similarity for different halo masses. Another long-standing question is how and to which extent turbulence contributes to the support of the gas against gravity. From a global perspective, the ratio of turbulent and thermal pressures is significant for the clusters in our simulation. On the other hand, a local measure is provided by the compression rate, i.e. the growth rate of the divergence of the flow. Particularly for the intracluster medium, we find that the dominant contribution against gravity comes from thermal pressure, while compressible turbulence effectively counteracts the support. For this reason it appears to be too simplistic to consider turbulence merely as an effective enhancement of thermal energy.
  • We present observations of transverse oscillations in slender Ca II H fibrils (SCFs) in the lower solar chromosphere. We use a 1 hr long time series of high- (spatial and temporal-) resolution seeing-free observations in a 0.11 nm wide passband covering the line core of Ca II H 396.9 nm from the second flight of the Sunrise balloon-borne solar observatory. The entire field of view, spanning the polarity inversion line of an active region close to the solar disk center, is covered with bright, thin, and very dynamic fine structures. Our analysis reveals the prevalence of transverse waves in SCFs with median amplitudes and periods on the order of 2.4+-0.8 km/s and 83+-29 s, respectively (with standard deviations given as uncertainties). We find that the transverse waves often propagate along (parts of) the SCFs with median phase speeds of 9+-14 km/s. While the propagation is only in one direction along the axis in some of the SCFs, propagating waves in both directions, as well as standing waves are also observed. The transverse oscillations are likely Alfvenic and are thought to be representative of magnetohydrodynamic kink waves. The wave propagation suggests that the rapid high-frequency transverse waves, often produced in the lower photosphere, can penetrate into the chromosphere with an estimated energy flux of ~ 15 kW/m^2. Characteristics of these waves differ from those reported for other fibrillar structures, which, however, were observed mainly in the upper solar chromosphere.
  • Convective flows are known as the prime means of transporting magnetic fields on the solar surface. Thus, small magnetic structures are good tracers of the turbulent flows. We study the migration and dispersal of magnetic bright features (MBFs) in intergranular areas observed at high spatial resolution with Sunrise/IMaX. We describe the flux dispersal of individual MBFs as a diffusion process whose parameters are computed for various areas in the quiet Sun and the vicinity of active regions from seeing-free data. We find that magnetic concentrations are best described as random walkers close to network areas (diffusion index, gamma=1.0), travelers with constant speeds over a supergranule (gamma=1.9-2.0), and decelerating movers in the vicinity of flux emergence and/or within active regions (gamma=1.4-1.5). The three types of regions host MBFs with mean diffusion coefficients of 130 km^2/s, 80-90 km^2/s, and 25-70 km^2/s, respectively. The MBFs in these three types of regions are found to display a distinct kinematic behavior at a confidence level in excess of 95%.
  • A dense forest of slender bright fibrils near a small solar active region is seen in high-quality narrowband Ca II H images from the SuFI instrument onboard the Sunrise balloon-borne solar observatory. The orientation of these slender Ca II H fibrils (SCF) overlaps with the magnetic field configuration in the low solar chromosphere derived by magnetostatic extrapolation of the photospheric field observed with Sunrise/IMaX and SDO/HMI. In addition, many observed SCFs are qualitatively aligned with small-scale loops computed from a novel inversion approach based on best-fit numerical MHD simulation. Such loops are organized in canopy-like arches over quiet areas that differ in height depending on the field strength near their roots.
  • How and where are coronal loops rooted in the solar lower atmosphere? The details of the magnetic environment and its evolution at the footpoints of coronal loops are crucial to understanding the processes of mass and energy supply to the solar corona. To address the above question, we use high-resolution line-of-sight magnetic field data from the Imaging Magnetograph eXperiment instrument on the SUNRISE balloon-borne observatory and coronal observations from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory of an emerging active region. We find that the coronal loops are often rooted at the locations with minor small-scale but persistent opposite-polarity magnetic elements very close to the larger dominant polarity. These opposite-polarity small-scale elements continually interact with the dominant polarity underlying the coronal loop through flux cancellation. At these locations we detect small inverse Y-shaped jets in chromospheric Ca II H images obtained from the SUNRISE Filter Imager during the flux cancellation. Our results indicate that magnetic flux cancellation and reconnection at the base of coronal loops due to mixed polarity fields might be a crucial feature for the supply of mass and energy into the corona.
  • The tetragonal copper oxide Bi$_2$CuO$_4$ has an unusual crystal structure with a three-dimensional network of well separated CuO$_4$ plaquettes. This material was recently predicted to host electronic excitations with an unconventional spectrum and the spin structure of its magnetically ordered state appearing at T$_N$ $\sim$43 K remains controversial. Here we present the results of detailed studies of specific heat, magnetic and dielectric properties of Bi$_2$CuO$_4$ single crystals grown by the floating zone technique, combined with the polarized neutron scattering and high-resolution X-ray measurements. Our polarized neutron scattering data show Cu spins are parallel to the $ab$ plane. Below the onset of the long range antiferromagnetic ordering we observe an electric polarization induced by an applied magnetic field, which indicates inversion symmetry breaking by the ordered state of Cu spins. For the magnetic field applied perpendicular to the tetragonal axis, the spin-induced ferroelectricity is explained in terms of the linear magnetoelectric effect that occurs in a metastable magnetic state. A relatively small electric polarization induced by the field parallel to the tetragonal axis may indicate a more complex magnetic ordering in Bi$_2$CuO$_4$.
  • Magneto-static models may overcome some of the issues facing force-free magnetic field extrapolations. So far they have seen limited use and have faced problems when applied to quiet-Sun data. Here we present a first application to an active region. We use solar vector magnetic field measurements gathered by the IMaX polarimeter during the flight of the \sunrise{} balloon-borne solar observatory in June 2013 as boundary condition for a magneto-static model of the higher solar atmosphere above an active region. The IMaX data are embedded in active region vector magnetograms observed with SDO/HMI. This work continues our magneto-static extrapolation approach, which has been applied earlier ({\it Paper I}) to a quiet Sun region observed with \sunrise{} I. In an active region the signal-to-noise-ratio in the measured Stokes parameters is considerably higher than in the quiet Sun and consequently the IMaX measurements of the horizontal photospheric magnetic field allow us to specify the free parameters of the model in a special class of linear magneto-static equilibria. The high spatial resolution of IMaX (110-130 km, pixel size 40 km) enables us to model the non-force-free layer between the photosphere and the mid chromosphere vertically by about 50 grid points. In our approach we can incorporate some aspects of the mixed beta layer of photosphere and chromosphere, e.g., taking a finite Lorentz force into account, which was not possible with lower resolution photospheric measurements in the past. The linear model does not, however, permit to model intrinsic nonlinear structures like strongly localized electric currents.
  • We report the detection of oscillations in slender Ca II H fibrils (SCFs) from high-resolution observations acquired with the Sunrise balloon-borne solar observatory. The SCFs show obvious oscillations in their intensity, but also their width. The oscillatory behaviors are investigated at several positions along the axes of the SCFs. A large majority of fibrils show signs of oscillations in intensity. Their periods and phase speeds are analyzed using a wavelet analysis. The width and intensity perturbations have overlapping distributions of the wave period. The obtained distributions have median values of the period of $32\pm17$s and $36\pm25$s, respectively. We find that the fluctuations of both parameters propagate in the SCFs with speeds of ${11}^{+49}_{-11}$ km/s and ${15}^{+34}_{-15}$ km/s, respectively. Furthermore, the width and intensity oscillations have a strong tendency to be either in anti-phase, or, to a smaller extent, in phase. This suggests that the oscillations of both parameters are caused by the same wave mode and that the waves are likely propagating. Taking all the evidence together, the most likely wave mode to explain all measurements and criteria is the fast sausage mode.
  • A new generation of solar instruments provides improved spectral, spatial, and temporal resolution, thus facilitating a better understanding of dynamic processes on the Sun. High-resolution observations often reveal multiple-component spectral line profiles, e.g., in the near-infrared He I 10830 \AA\ triplet, which provides information about the chromospheric velocity and magnetic fine structure. We observed an emerging flux region, including two small pores and an arch filament system, on 2015 April 17 with the 'very fast spectroscopic mode' of the GREGOR Infrared Spectrograph (GRIS) situated at the 1.5-meter GREGOR solar telescope at Observatorio del Teide, Tenerife, Spain. We discuss this method of obtaining fast (one per minute) spectral scans of the solar surface and its potential to follow dynamic processes on the Sun. We demonstrate the performance of the 'very fast spectroscopic mode' by tracking chromospheric high-velocity features in the arch filament system.
  • The SUNRISE balloon-borne solar observatory, consisting of a 1~m aperture telescope that provided a stabilized image to a UV filter imager and an imaging vector polarimeter, carried out its second science flight in June 2013. It provided observations of parts of active regions at high spatial resolution, including the first high-resolution images in the Mg~{\sc ii}~k line. The obtained data are of very high quality, with the best UV images reaching the diffraction limit of the telescope at 3000~\AA\ after Multi-Frame Blind Deconvolution reconstruction accounting for phase-diversity information. Here a brief update is given of the instruments and the data reduction techniques, which includes an inversion of the polarimetric data. Mainly those aspects that evolved compared with the first flight are described. A tabular overview of the observations is given. In addition, an example time series of a part of the emerging active region NOAA AR~11768 observed relatively close to disk centre is described and discussed in some detail. The observations cover the pores in the trailing polarity of the active region, as well as the polarity inversion line where flux emergence was ongoing and a small flare-like brightening occurred in the course of the time series. The pores are found to contain magnetic field strengths ranging up to 2500~G and, while large pores are clearly darker and cooler than the quiet Sun in all layers of the photosphere, the temperature and brightness of small pores approach or even exceed those of the quiet Sun in the upper photosphere.
  • We use seeing-free high spatial resolution Ca II H data obtained by the SUNRISE observatory to determine properties of slender fibrils in the lower solar chromosphere. In this work we use intensity images taken with the SUFI instrument in the Ca II H line during the second scientific flight of the SUNRISE observatory to identify and track elongated bright structures. After the identification, we analyze theses structures in order to extract their morphological properties. We identify 598 slender Ca II H fibrils (SCFs) with an average width of around 180 km, a length between 500 km and 4000 km, an average lifetime of ~400 s, and an average curvature of 0.002 arcsec^-1. The maximum lifetime of the SCFs within our time series of 57 minutes is ~2000 s. We discuss similarities and differences of the SCFs with other small-scale, chromospheric structures such as spicules of type I and II, or Ca II K fibrils.
  • We study the dynamics and topology of an emerging magnetic flux concentration using high spatial resolution spectropolarimetric data acquired with the Imaging Magnetograph eXperiment on board the Sunrise balloon-borne solar observatory. We obtain the full vector magnetic field and the line-of-sight (LOS) velocity through inversions of the Fe I line at 525.02 nm with the SPINOR code. The derived vector magnetic field is used to trace magnetic field lines. Two magnetic flux concentrations with different polarity and LOS velocities are found to be connected by a group of arch-shaped magnetic field lines. The positive polarity footpoint is weaker (1100 G) and displays an upflow, while the negative polarity footpoint is stronger (2200 G) and shows a downflow. This configuration is naturally interpreted as a siphon flow along an arched magnetic flux tube.
  • We present a new method of Stokes inversion of spectropolarimetric data and evaluate it by taking the example of a SUNRISE/IMaX observation. An archive of synthetic Stokes profiles is obtained by the spectral synthesis of state-of-the-art magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulations and a realistic degradation to the level of the observed data. The definition of a merit function allows the archive to be searched for the synthetic Stokes profiles that match the observed profiles best. In contrast to traditional Stokes inversion codes, which solve the Unno-Rachkovsky equations for the polarized radiative transfer numerically and fit the Stokes profiles iteratively, the new technique provides the full set of atmospheric parameters. This gives us the ability to start an MHD simulation that takes the inversion result as initial condition. After a relaxation process of half an hour solar time we obtain physically consistent MHD data sets with a target similar to the observation. The new MHD simulation is used to repeat the method in a second iteration, which further improves the match between observation and simulation, resulting in a factor of 2.2 lower mean $\chi^2$ value. One advantage of the new technique is that it provides the physical parameters on a geometrical height scale. It constitutes a first step towards inversions giving results consistent with the MHD equations.
  • Active regions are the most prominent manifestations of solar magnetic fields; their generation and dissipation are fundamental problems in solar physics. Light bridges are commonly present during sunspot decay, but a comprehensive picture of their role in the removal of photospheric magnetic field is still missing. We study the three dimensional configuration of a sunspot and in particular its light bridge during one of the last stages of its decay. We present the magnetic and thermodynamical stratification inferred from full Stokes inversions of the photospheric Si I 10827 \AA\ and Ca I 10839 \AA\ lines obtained with the GREGOR Infrared Spectrograph of the GREGOR telescope at Observatorio del Teide, Tenerife, Spain. The analysis is complemented by a study of continuum images covering the disk passage of the active region, which are provided by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. The sunspot shows a light bridge with penumbral continuum intensity that separates the central umbra from a smaller umbra. We find that in this region the magnetic field lines form a canopy with lower magnetic field strength in the inner part. The photospheric light bridge is dominated by gas pressure (high-$\beta$), as opposed to the surrounding umbra where the magnetic pressure is higher. A convective flow is observed in the light bridge. This flow is able to bend the magnetic field lines and to produce field reversals. The field lines close above the light bridge and become as vertical and strong as in the surrounding umbra. We conclude that it develops because of two highly magnetized regions which come closer during the sunspot evolution.
  • Context. Investigations of the magnetism of the quiet Sun are hindered by extremely weak polarization signals in Fraunhofer spectral lines. Photon noise, straylight, and the systematically different sensitivity of the Zeeman effect to longitudinal and transversal magnetic fields result in controversial results in terms of the strength and angular distribution of the magnetic field vector. Aims. The information content of Stokes measurements close to the diffraction limit of the 1.5 m GREGOR telescope is analyzed. We took the effects of spatial straylight and photon noise into account. Methods. Highly sensitive full Stokes measurements of a quiet-Sun region at disk center in the deep photospheric Fe I lines in the 1.56 {\mu}m region were obtained with the infrared spectropolarimeter GRIS at the GREGOR telescope. Noise statistics and Stokes V asymmetries were analyzed and compared to a similar data set of the Hinode spectropolarimeter (SOT/SP). Simple diagnostics based directly on the shape and strength of the profiles were applied to the GRIS data. We made use of the magnetic line ratio technique, which was tested against MHD simulations. Results. About 80% of the GRIS spectra of a very quiet solar region show polarimetric signals above a 3{\sigma} level. Area and amplitude asymmetries agree well with small-scale surface dynamo MHD simulations. The magnetic line ratio analysis reveals ubiquitous magnetic regions in the ten to hundred Gauss range with some concentrations of kilo-Gauss fields. Conclusions. The GRIS spectropolarimetric data at a spatial resolution of 0.40" are so far unique in the combination of high spatial resolution scans and high magnetic field sensitivity. Nevertheless, the unavoidable effect of spatial straylight and the resulting dilution of the weak Stokes profiles means that inversion techniques still bear a high risk of misinterpretating the data.
  • Ellerman Bombs are signatures of magnetic reconnection, which is an important physical process in the solar atmosphere. How and where they occur is a subject of debate. In this paper we analyse Sunrise/IMaX data together with 3D MHD simulations that aim to reproduce the exact scenario proposed for the formation of these features. Although the observed event seems to be more dynamic and violent than the simulated one, simulations clearly confirm the basic scenario for the production of EBs. The simulations also reveal the full complexity of the underlying process. The simulated observations show that the Fe I 525.02 nm line gives no information on the height where reconnection takes place. It can only give clues about the heating in the aftermath of the reconnection. The information on the magnetic field vector and velocity at this spatial resolution is, however, extremely valuable because it shows what numerical models miss and how they can be improved.
  • Arch filament systems occur in active sunspot groups, where a fibril structure connects areas of opposite magnetic polarity, in contrast to active region filaments that follow the polarity inversion line. We used the GREGOR Infrared Spectrograph (GRIS) to obtain the full Stokes vector in the spectral lines Si I 1082.7 nm, He I 1083.0 nm, and Ca I 1083.9 nm. We focus on the near-infrared calcium line to investigate the photospheric magnetic field and velocities, and use the line core intensities and velocities of the helium line to study the chromospheric plasma. The individual fibrils of the arch filament system connect the sunspot with patches of magnetic polarity opposite to that of the spot. These patches do not necessarily coincide with pores, where the magnetic field is strongest. Instead, areas are preferred not far from the polarity inversion line. These areas exhibit photospheric downflows of moderate velocity, but significantly higher downflows of up to 30 km/s in the chromospheric helium line. Our findings can be explained with new emerging flux where the matter flows downward along the fieldlines of rising flux tubes, in agreement with earlier results.
  • The various mechanisms of magneto-convective energy transport determines the structure of sunspots and active regions. We characterise the appearance of light bridges and other fine-structure details and elaborate on their magneto-convective nature. We present speckle-reconstructed images taken with the broad-band imager at the 1.5 m GREGOR telescope in the 486nm and 589nm bands. We estimate the spatial resolution from the noise characteristics of the image bursts and obtain 0.08" at 589nm. We describe structure details in individual best images as well as the temporal evolution of selected features. We find branched dark lanes extending along thin (~1") light bridges in sunspots at various heliocentric angles. In thick (~2") light bridges the branches are disconnected from the central lane and have a Y shape with a bright grain toward the umbra. The images reveal that light bridges exist on varying intensity levels and that their small-scale features evolve on timescales of minutes. Faint light bridges show dark lanes outlined by the surrounding bright features. Dark lanes are very common and are also found in the boundary of pores. They have a characteristic width of 0.1" or smaller. Intergranular dark lanes of that width are seen in active region granulation. While central dark lanes in thin light bridges are elevated and associated with an density increase above upflows, the dark lane branches correspond to locations of downflows and are depressed relative to the adjacent bright plasma. Thick light bridges with central dark lanes show no projection effect. They have a flat elevated plateau that falls off steeply at the umbral boundary. There, Y-shaped filaments form as they do in the inner penumbra. This indicates the presence of inclined magnetic fields, meaning that the umbral magnetic field is wrapped around the convective light bridge.
  • The fine-structure of magnetic field of a sunspot penumbra in the upper chromosphere is to be explored and compared to that in the photosphere. High spatial resolution spectropolarimetric observations were recorded with the 1.5-meter GREGOR telescope using the GREGOR Infrared Spectrograph (GRIS). The observed spectral domain includes the upper chromospheric He I triplet at 1083.0 nm and the photospheric Si I 1082.7 nm and Ca I 1083.3 nm spectral lines. The upper chromospheric magnetic field is obtained by inverting the He I triplet assuming a Milne-Eddington type model atmosphere. A height dependent inversion was applied to the Si I 1082.7 nm and Ca I 1083.3 nm lines to obtain the photospheric magnetic field. We find that the inclination of the magnetic field shows variations in the azimuthal direction both in the photosphere, but also in the upper chromosphere. The chromospheric variations remarkably well coincide with the variations in the inclination of the photospheric field and resemble the well-known spine and inter-spine structure in the photospheric layers of penumbrae. The typical peak-to-peak variations in the inclination of the magnetic field in the upper chromosphere is found to be 10-15 degree, i.e., roughly half the variation in the photosphere. In contrast, the magnetic field strength of the observed penumbra does not show variations on small spatial scales in the upper chromosphere. Thanks to the high spatial resolution observations possible with the GREGOR telescope at 1.08 microns, we find that the prominent small-scale fluctuations in the magnetic field inclination, which are a salient part of the property of sunspot penumbral photospheres, also persist in the chromosphere, although at somewhat reduced amplitudes. Such a complex magnetic configuration may facilitate penumbral chromospheric dynamic phenomena, such as penumbral micro-jets or transient bright dots.
  • Context. A significant part of the penumbral magnetic field returns below the surface in the very deep photosphere. For lines in the visible, a large portion of this return field can only be detected indirectly by studying its imprints on strongly asymmetric and three-lobed Stokes V profiles. Infrared lines probe a narrow layer in the very deep photosphere, providing the possibility of directly measuring the orientation of magnetic fields close to the solar surface. Aims. We study the topology of the penumbral magnetic field in the lower photosphere, focusing on regions where it returns below the surface. Methods. We analyzed 71 spectropolarimetric datasets from Hinode and from the GREGOR infrared spectrograph. We inferred the quality and polarimetric accuracy of the infrared data after applying several reduction steps. Techniques of spectral inversion and forward synthesis were used to test the detection algorithm. We compared the morphology and the fractional penumbral area covered by reversed-polarity and three-lobed Stokes V profiles for sunspots at disk center. We determined the amount of reversed-polarity and three-lobed Stokes V profiles in visible and infrared data of sunspots at various heliocentric angles. From the results, we computed center-to-limb variation curves, which were interpreted in the context of existing penumbral models. Results. Observations in visible and near-infrared spectral lines yield a significant difference in the penumbral area covered by magnetic fields of opposite polarity. In the infrared, the number of reversed-polarity Stokes V profiles is smaller by a factor of two than in the visible. For three-lobed Stokes V profiles the numbers differ by up to an order of magnitude.