• Stellar rotation affects the transport of chemical elements and angular momentum and is therefore a key process during stellar evolution, which is still not fully understood. This is especially true for massive stars, which are important for the chemical enrichment of the universe. It is therefore important to constrain their physical parameters and internal angular momentum distribution to calibrate stellar structure and evolution models. Stellar internal rotation can be probed through asteroseismic studies of rotationally split oscillations but such results are still quite rare, especially for stars more massive than the Sun. The SPB star HD201433 is known to be part of a single-lined spectroscopic triple system, with two low-mass companions orbiting with periods of about 3.3 and 154 d. Our results are based on photometric observations made by BRITE - Constellation and the SMEI on board the Coriolis satellite, high-resolution spectroscopy, and more than 96 years of radial velocity measurements. We identify a sequence of 9 rotationally split dipole modes in the photometric time series and establish that HD201433 is in principle a solid-body rotator with a very slow rotation period of 297+/-76 d. Tidal interaction with the inner companion has, however, significantly accelerated the spin of the surface layers by a factor of approximately one hundred. The angular momentum transfer onto the surface of HD201433 is also reflected by the statistically significant decrease of the orbital period of about 0.9 s during the last 96 years. Combining the asteroseismic inferences with the spectroscopic measurements and the orbital analysis of the inner binary system, we conclude that tidal interactions between the central SPB star and its inner companion have almost circularised the orbit but not yet aligned all spins of the system and have just begun to synchronise rotation.
  • Space-based photometric measurements first revealed low-amplitude irregularities in the pulsations of Cepheid stars, but their origins and how commonly they occur remain uncertain. To investigate this phenomenon, we present MOST space telescope photometry of two Cepheids. V473 Lyrae is a second-overtone, strongly modulated Cepheid, while U Trianguli Australis is a Cepheid pulsating simultaneously in the fundamental mode and first overtone. The nearly continuous, high-precision photometry reveals alternations in the amplitudes of cycles in V473 Lyr, the first case of period doubling detected in a classical Cepheid. In U TrA, we tentatively identify one peak as the $f_X$ or 0.61-type mode often seen in conjunction with the first radial overtone in Cepheids, but given the short length of the data, we cannot rule out that it is a combination peak instead. Ground-based photometry and spectroscopy were obtained to follow two modulation cycles in V473 Lyr and to better specify its physical parameters. The simultaneous data yield the phase lag parameter (the phase difference between maxima in luminosity and radial velocity) of a second-overtone Cepheid for the first time. We find no evidence for a period change in U TrA or an energy exchange between the fundamental mode and the first overtone during the last 50 years, contrary to earlier indications. Period doubling in V473 Lyr provides a strong argument that mode interactions do occur in some Cepheids and we may hypothesise that it could be behind the amplitude modulation, as recently proposed for Blazhko RR Lyrae stars.
  • Multiple oscillation frequencies separated by close to or less than the formal frequency resolution of a data set are a serious problem in the frequency analysis of time series data. We present a new and fully automated Bayesian approach that searches for close frequencies in time series data and assesses their significance by comparison to no signal and a mono-periodic signal. We extensively test the approach with synthetic data sets and apply it to the 156 days-long high-precision BRITE photometry of the SPB star HD 201433, for which we find a sequence of nine statistically significant rotationally split dipole modes.
  • The BRIght Target Explorer (BRITE) Constellation is the first nanosatellite mission applied to astrophysical research. Five satellites in low-Earth orbits perform precise optical two-colour photometry of the brightest stars in the night sky. BRITE is naturally well suited for variability studies of hot stars. This contribution describes the basic outline of the mission and some initial problems that needed to be overcome. Some information on BRITE data products, how to access them, and how to join their scientific exploration is provided. Finally, a brief summary of the first scientific results obtained by BRITE is given.
  • We report a simultaneous ground and space-based photometric study of the Beta Cephei star Nu Eridani. Half a year of observations have been obtained by four of the five satellites constituting BRITE-Constellation, supplemented with ground-based photoelectric photometry. We show that carefully combining the two data sets virtually eliminates the aliasing problem that often hampers time-series analyses. We detect 40 periodic signals intrinsic to the star in the light curves. Despite a lower detection limit we do not recover all the pressure and mixed modes previously reported in the literature, but we newly detect six additional gravity modes. This behaviour is a consequence of temporal changes in the pulsation amplitudes that we also detected for some of the p modes. We point out that the dependence of theoretically predicted pulsation amplitude on wavelength is steeper in visual passbands than those observationally measured, to the extent that the three dominant pulsation modes of Nu Eridani would be incorrectly identified using data in optical filters only. We discuss possible reasons for this discrepancy.
  • BRITE (BRIght Target Explorer) Constellation, the first nanosatellite mission applied to astrophysical research, is a collaboration among Austria, Canada and Poland. The fleet of satellites (6 launched, 5 functioning) performs precise optical photometry of the brightest stars in the night sky. A pioneering mission like BRITE - with optics and instruments restricted to small volume, mass and power in several nanosatellites, whose measurements must be coordinated in orbit - poses many unique challenges. We discuss the technical issues, including problems encountered during on-orbit commissioning (especially higher-than expected sensitivity of the CCDs to particle radiation). We describe in detail how the BRITE team has mitigated these problems, and provide a complete overview of mission operations. This paper serves as a template for how to effectively plan, build and operate future low-cost niche-driven space astronomy missions.
  • This paper aims to precisely determine the masses and detect pulsation modes in the two massive components of Beta Cen with BRITE-Constellation photometry. In addition, seismic models for the components are considered and the effects of fast rotation are discussed. This is done to test the limitations of seismic modeling for this very difficult case. A simultaneous fit of visual and spectroscopic orbits is used to self-consistently derive the orbital parameters, and subsequently the masses, of the components. The derived masses are equal to 12.02 +/- 0.13 and 10.58 +/- 0.18 M_Sun. The parameters of the wider, A - B system, presently approaching periastron passage, are constrained. Analysis of the combined blue- and red-filter BRITE-Constellation photometric data of the system revealed the presence of 19 periodic terms, of which eight are likely g modes, nine are p modes, and the remaining two are combination terms. It cannot be excluded that one or two low-frequency terms are rotational frequencies. It is possible that both components of Beta Cen are Beta Cep/SPB hybrids. An attempt to use the apparent changes of frequency to distinguish which modes originate in which component did not succeed, but there is potential for using this method when more BRITE data become available. Agena seems to be one of very few rapidly rotating massive objects with rich p- and g-mode spectra, and precisely known masses. It can therefore be used to gain a better understanding of the excitation of pulsations in relatively rapidly rotating stars and their seismic modeling. Finally, this case illustrates the potential of BRITE-Constellation data for the detection of rich-frequency spectra of small-amplitude modes in massive pulsating stars.
  • Binary stars provide a valuable test of stellar structure and evolution, because the masses of the individual stellar components can be derived with high accuracy and in a model-independent way. In this work, we study Spica, an eccentric double-lined spectroscopic binary system with a beta Cep type variable primary component. We use state-of-the-art modelling tools to determine accurate orbital elements of the binary system and atmospheric parameters of both stellar components. We interpret the short-period variability intrinsic to the primary component, detected on top of the orbital motion both in the photometric and spectroscopic data. The non-LTE based spectrum analysis reveals two stars of similar atmospheric chemical composition consistent with the present day cosmic abundance standard defined by Nieva&Przybilla (2012). The masses and radii of the stars are found to be 11.43+/-1.15 M_sun and 7.21+/-0.75 M_sun, and 7.47+/-0.54 R_sun and 3.74+/-0.53 R_sun for the primary and secondary, respectively. We find the primary component to pulsate in three independent modes, of which one is identified as a radial mode, while the two others are found to be non-radial, low degree l modes. The frequency of one of these modes is an exact multiple of the orbital frequency, and the l=m=2 mode identification suggests a tidal nature for this particular mode. We find a very good agreement between the derived dynamical and evolutionary masses for the Spica system to within the observational errors of the measured masses. The age of the system is estimated to be 12.5+/-1 Myr.
  • The study of RR Lyrae stars has recently been invigorated thanks to the long, uninterrupted, ultra-precise time series data provided by the Kepler and CoRoT space telescopes. We give a brief overview of the new observational findings concentrating on the connection between period doubling and the Blazhko modulation, and the omnipresence of additional periodicities in all RR Lyrae subtypes, except for non-modulated RRab stars. Recent theoretical results demonstrate that if more than two modes are present in a nonlinear dynamical system such as a high-amplitude RR Lyrae star, the outcome is often an extremely intricate dynamical state. Thus, based on these discoveries, an underlying picture of complex dynamical interactions between modes is emerging which sheds new light on the century-old Blazhko-phenomenon, as well. New directions of theoretical efforts, like multi-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations, future space photometric missions and detailed spectroscopic investigations will pave the way towards a more complete understanding of the atmospheric and pulsation dynamics of these enigmatic touchstone objects.
  • The quantity and quality of satellite photometric data strings is revealing details in Cepheid variation at very low levels. Specifically, we observed a Cepheid pulsating in the fundamental mode and one pulsating in the first overtone with the Canadian MOST satellite. The 3.7-d period fundamental mode pulsator (RT Aur) has a light curve that repeats precisely, and can be modeled by a Fourier series very accurately. The overtone pulsator (SZ Tau, 3.1 d period) on the other hand shows light curve variation from cycle to cycle which we characterize by the variations in the Fourier parameters. We present arguments that we are seeing instability in the pulsation cycle of the overtone pulsator, and that this is also a characteristic of the O-C curves of overtone pulsators. On the other hand, deviations from cycle to cycle as a function of pulsation phase follow a similar pattern in both stars, increasing after minimum radius. In summary, pulsation in the overtone pulsator is less stable than that of the fundamental mode pulsator at both long and short timescales.
  • We search for signs of period doubling in CoRoT RR Lyrae stars. The occurrence of this dynamical effect in modulated RR Lyrae stars might help us to gain more information about the mysterious Blazhko effect. The temporal variability of the additional frequencies in representatives of all subtypes of RR Lyrae stars is also investigated. We pre-process CoRoT light curves by applying trend and jump correction and outlier removal. Standard Fourier technique is used to analyze the frequency content of our targets and follow the time dependent phenomena. The most comprehensive collection of CoRoT RR Lyrae stars, including new discoveries is presented and analyzed. We found alternating maxima and in some cases half-integer frequencies in four CoRoT Blazhko RR Lyrae stars, as clear signs of the presence of period doubling. This reinforces that period doubling is an important ingredient to understand the Blazhko effect - a premise we derived previously from the Kepler RR Lyrae sample. As expected, period doubling is detectable only for short time intervals in most modulated RRab stars. Our results show that the temporal variability of the additional frequencies in all RR Lyrae sub-types is ubiquitous. The ephemeral nature and the highly variable amplitude of these variations suggest a complex underlying dynamics of and an intricate interplay between radial and possibly nonradial modes in RR Lyrae stars. The omnipresence of additional modes in all types of RR Lyrae - except in non-modulated RRab stars - implies that asteroseismology of these objects should be feasible in the near future (Abridged).
  • We demonstrate that a seismic analysis of stars in their earliest evolutionary phases is a powerful method to identify young stars and distinguish their evolutionary states. The early star that is born from the gravitational collapse of a molecular cloud reaches at some point sufficient temperature, mass and luminosity to be detected. Accretion stops and the pre-main sequence star that emerges is nearly fully convective and chemically homogeneous. It will continue to contract gravitationally until the density and temperature in the core are high enough to start nuclear burning of hydrogen. We show that there is a relationship between detected pulsation properties for a sample of young stars and their evolutionary status illustrating the potential of asteroseismology for the early evolutionary phases.
  • Context: The central star of the HR 8799 system is a gamma Doradus-type pulsator. The system harbours four planetary-mass companions detected by direct imaging, and is a good solar system analogue. The masses of the companions are not known accurately, because the estimation depends strongly on the age of the system, which is also not known with sufficient accuracy. Asteroseismic studies of the star might help to better constrain the age of HR 8799. We organized an extensive photometric and multi-site spectroscopic observing campaign for studying the pulsations of the central star. Aims: The aim of the present study is to investigate the pulsation properties of HR 8799 in detail via the ultra-precise 47-d-long nearly continuous photometry obtained with the MOST space telescope, and to find as many independent pulsation modes as possible, which is the prerequisite of an asteroseismic age determination. Methods: We carried out Fourier analysis of the wide-band photometric time series. Results: We find that resonance and sudden amplitude changes characterize the pulsation of HR 8799. The dominant frequency is always at f1 = 1.978 c/d. Many multiples of one ninth of the dominant frequency appear in the Fourier spectrum of the MOST data: n/9 f1, where n={1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 13, 14, 17, 18}. Our analysis also reveals that many of these peaks show strong amplitude decrease and phase variations even on the 47-d time-scale. The dependencies between the pulsation frequencies of HR 8799 make the planned subsequent asteroseismic analysis rather difficult. We point out some resemblance between the light curve of HR 8799 and the modulated pulsation light curves of Blazhko RR Lyrae stars.
  • Pulsating stars in binary systems are ideal laboratories to test stellar evolution and pulsation theory, since a direct, model-independent determination of component masses is possible. The high-precision CoRoT photometry allows a detailed view of the frequency content of pulsating stars, enabling detection of patterns in their distribution. The object HD 51844 is such a case showing periastron brightening instead of eclipses. We present a comprehensive study of the HD 51844 system, where we derive physical parameters of both components, the pulsation content and frequency patterns. Additionally, we obtain the orbital elements, including masses, and the chemical composition of the stars. Time series analysis using standard tools was mployed to extract the pulsation frequencies. Photospheric abundances of 21 chemical elements were derived by means of spectrum synthesis. We derived orbital elements both by fitting the observed radial velocities and the light curves, and we did asteroseismic modelling as well. We found that HD 51844 is a double lined spectroscopic binary. The determined abundances are consistent with delta Delphini classification. We determined the orbital period (33.498 +- 0.002 d), the eccentricity (0.484 +- 0.020), the mass ratio (0.988 +- 0.02), and the masses to 2.0 +- 0.2 M_sun for both components. Only one component showed pulsation. Two p modes (f_22 and f_36) and one g mode (f_orb) may be tidally excited. Among the 115 frequencies, we detected triplets due to the frequency modulation, frequency differences connected to the orbital period, and unexpected resonances (3:2, 3:5, and 3:4), which is a new discovery for a delta Scuti star.
  • BRITE-Constellation (where BRITE stands for BRIght Target Explorer) is an international nanosatellite mission to monitor photometrically, in two colours, brightness and temperature variations of stars brighter than V = 4. The current mission design consists of three pairs of 7 kg nanosats from Austria, Canada and Poland carrying optical telescopes and CCDs. One instrument in each pair is equipped with a blue filter; the other, a red filter. The first two nanosats are UNIBRITE, designed and built by University of Toronto Institute for Aerospace Studies - Space Flight Laboratory and its twin, BRITE-Austria, built by the Technical University Graz with support of UTIAS-SFL. They were launched on 25 February 2013 by the Indian Space Agency under contract to the Canadian Space Agency into a low-Earth dusk-dawn polar orbit.
  • The high accuracy of space data increased the number of the periodicities determined for pulsating variable stars, but the mode identification is still a critical point in the non-asymptotic regime. We use regularities in frequency spacings for identifying the pulsation modes of the recently discovered delta Sct star ID 102749568. In addition to analysing CoRoT light curves (15252 datapoints spanning 131 days), we obtained and analysed both spectroscopic and extended multi-colour photometric data. We applied standard tools (MUFRAN, Period04, SigSpec, and FAMIAS) for time-series analysis. A satisfactory light-curve fit was obtaining by means of 52 independent modes and 15 combination terms. The frequency spacing revealed distinct peaks around large (25.55-31.43 microHz), intermediate (9.80, 7.66 microHz), and low (2.35 microHz) separations. We directly identified 9 modes, and the l and n values of other three modes were extrapolated. The combined application of spectroscopy, multi-colour photometry, and modelling yielded the precise physical parameters and confirmed the observational mode identification. The large separation constrained the log g and related quantities. The dominant mode is the radial first overtone.
  • We present results from three weeks' photometric monitoring of the magnetic helium-strong star sigma Ori E using the MOST microsatellite. The star's light curve is dominated by twice-per-rotation eclipse-like dimmings arising when magnetospheric clouds transit across and occult the stellar disk. However, no evidence is found for any abrupt centrifugal breakout of plasma from the magnetosphere, either in the residual flux or in the depths of the light minima. Motivated by this finding we compare the observationally inferred magnetospheric mass against that predicted by a breakout analysis. The large discrepancy between the values leads us to argue that centrifugal breakout does not play a significant role in establishing the magnetospheric mass budget of sigma Ori E.
  • We concentrate on an asteroseismological study of HD 261711, a rather hot delta Scuti type pulsating member of the young open cluster NGC 2264 located at the blue border of the instability region. HD 261711 was discovered to be a pre-main sequence delta Scuti star using the time series photometry obtained by the MOST satellite in 2006. High-precision, time-series photometry of HD 261711 was obtained by the MOST and CoRoT satellites in 4 separate new observing runs that are put into context with the star's fundamental atmospheric parameters obtained from spectroscopy. With the new MOST data set from 2011/12 and the two CoRoT light curves from 2008 and 2011/12, the delta Scuti variability was confirmed and regular groups of frequencies were discovered. The two pulsation frequencies identified in the data from the first MOST observing run in 2006 are confirmed and 23 new delta Scuti-type frequencies were discovered using the CoRoT data. Weighted average frequencies for each group are related to l=0 and l=1 p-modes. Evidence for amplitude modulation of the frequencies in two groups is seen. The effective temperature was derived to be 8600$\pm$200 K, log g is 4.1$\pm$0.2, and the projected rotational velocity is 53$\pm$1km/s. Using our Teff value and the radius of 1.8$\pm$0.5 Rsun derived from SED fitting, we get a log L/Lsun of 1.20$\pm$0.14 which agrees well to the seismologically determined values of 1.65 Rsun and, hence, a log L/Lsun of 1.13. The radial velocity of 14$\pm$2 km/s we derived for HD 261711, confirms the star's membership to NGC 2264. Our asteroseismic models suggest that HD 261711 is a delta Scuti-type star close to the zero-age main sequence (ZAMS) with a mass of 1.8 to 1.9Msun. HD 261711 is either a young ZAMS star or a late PMS star just before the onset of hydrogen-core burning.
  • MOST observations and model analysis of the Herbig Ae star HD 34282 (V1366 Ori) reveal {\delta}-Scuti pulsations. 22 frequencies are observed, 10 of which confirm those previously identified by Amado et al. (2006), and 12 of which are newly discovered in this work. We show that the weighted-average frequency in each group fits the radial p-mode frequencies of viable models. We argue that the observed pulsation spectrum extends just to the edge to the acoustic cut-off frequency and show that this also is consistent with our best-fitting models.
  • CoRoT ID 105733033 is an excellent example of hybrid pulsators as it shows g- and p-modes with almost similar amplitudes in two clearly distinct frequency domains. Classical Fourier analysis allows the dectection of frequencies with an amplitude as small as 0.1 mmag up to 50c/d. The frequency spectrum of CoRoT ID 105733033 clearly consists of two distinct ranges, which are typical of gamma Doradus and delta Scuti pulsation. Focus was placed on the identification of linear combinations and frequencies due to the coupling between gamma Doradus and delta Scuti modes. We detect 198 gamma Doradus type frequencies in the range [0.25;4]c/d, of which 180 are not combination frequencies, and 24 of them are separated by a constant period-interval Delta P=0.03074d. According to the asymptotic theory, these 24 frequencies correspond to a series of g-modes of the same ell-degree and different radial orders n. We also detect 246 delta Scuti type frequencies in the range [10.1;63.4]c/d. The dominant frequency F=12.6759c/d was identified as the fundamental radial mode. Our most noteworthy result is that all the main gamma Doradus frequencies f_i are also detected in the delta Scuti domain as F +- f_i with four times smaller amplitudes. Once these frequencies were removed, only 59 can be considered as individual delta Scuti frequencies. A coupling between g- and p-modes is proposed to be a tool for detecting g-modes in the Sun, but this coupling has never yet been observed. Our present study may be valuable input to theoretical studies, addressing the mutual influence of g- and p-mode cavities and the deviation from classical theory. Furthermore, we identify a sequence of g-modes belonging to the same ell but with consecutive orders n.
  • The Praesepe cluster contains a number of Delta Sct and Gamma Dor pulsators. Asteroseismology of cluster stars is simplified by the common distance, age and stellar abundances. Since asteroseismology requires a large number of known frequencies, the small pulsation amplitudes of these stars require space satellite campaigns. The present study utilizes photometric MOST satellite measurements in order to determine the pulsation frequencies of two evolved (EP Cnc, BT Cnc) and two main-sequence (BS Cnc, HD 73872) Delta Sct stars in the Praesepe cluster. The frequency analysis of the 2008 and 2009 data detected up to 34 frequencies per star with most amplitudes in the submillimag range. In BS Cnc, two modes showed strong amplitude variability between 2008 and 2009. The frequencies ranged from 0.76 to 41.7 c/d. After considering the different evolutionary states and mean stellar densities of these four stars, the differences and large ranges in frequency remain.
  • Context. The advent of space-borne missions such as CoRoT or Kepler providing photometric data has brought new possibilities for asteroseismology across the H-R diagram. Solar-like oscillations are now observed in many stars, including red giants and main- sequence stars. Aims. Based on several hundred identified pulsating red giants, we aim to characterize their oscillation amplitudes and widths. These observables are compared with those of main-sequence stars in order to test trends and scaling laws for these parameters for both main-sequence stars and red giants. Methods. An automated fitting procedure is used to analyze several hundred Fourier spectra. For each star, a modeled spectrum is fitted to the observed oscillation spectrum, and mode parameters are derived. Results. Amplitudes and widths of red-giant solar-like oscillations are estimated for several hundred modes of oscillation. Amplitudes are relatively high (several hundred ppm) and widths relatively small (very few tenths of a {\mu}Hz). Conclusions. Widths measured in main-sequence stars show a different variation with the effective temperature than red giants. A single scaling law is derived for mode amplitudes of both red giants and main-sequence stars versus their luminosity to mass ratio. However, our results suggest that two regimes may also be compatible with the observations.
  • Precise time-series photometry with the MOST satellite has led to identification of 10 pulsation frequencies in the rapidly oscillating Ap (roAp) star HD 134214. We have fitted the observed frequencies with theoretical frequencies of axisymmetric modes in a grid of stellar models with dipole magnetic fields. We find that, among models with a standard composition of $(X,Z) = (0.70,0.02)$ and with suppressed convection, eigenfrequencies of a $1.65\,{\rm M}_\odot$ model with $\log T_{\rm eff} = 3.858$ and a polar magnetic field strength of 4.1kG agree best with the observed frequencies. We identify the observed pulsation frequency with the largest amplitude as a deformed dipole ($\ell = 1$) mode, and the four next-largest-amplitude frequencies as deformed $\ell = 2$ modes. These modes have a radial quasi-node in the outermost atmospheric layers ($\tau \sim 10^{-3}$). Although the model frequencies agree roughly with observed ones, they are all above the acoustic cut-off frequency for the model atmosphere and hence are predicted to be damped. The excitation mechanism for the pulsations of HD 134214 is not clear, but further investigation of these modes may be a probe of the atmospheric structure in this magnetic chemically peculiar star.
  • We present high-precision time-series photometry of the classical delta Scuti star HD 144277 obtained with the MOST (Microvariability and Oscillations of STars) satellite in two consecutive years. The observed regular frequency patterns are investigated asteroseismologically. HD 144277 is a hot A-type star that is located on the blue border of the classical instability strip. While we mostly observe low radial order modes in classical delta Scuti stars, HD 144277 presents a different case. Its high observed frequencies, i.e., between 59.9c/d (693.9 microHz) and 71.1c/d (822.8microHz), suggest higher radial orders. We examine the progression of the regular frequency spacings from the low radial order to the asymptotic frequency region. Frequency analysis was performed using Period04 and SigSpec. The results from the MOST observing runs in 2009 and 2010 were compared to each other. The resulting frequencies were submitted to asteroseismic analysis. HD 144277 was discovered to be a delta Scuti star using the time-series photometry observed by the MOST satellite. Twelve independent pulsation frequencies lying in four distinct groups were identified. Two additional frequencies were found to be combination frequencies. The typical spacing of 3.6c/d corresponds to the spacing between subsequent radial and dipole modes, therefore the spacing between radial modes is twice this value, 7.2c/d. Based on the assumption of slow rotation, we find evidence that the two radial modes are the sixth and seventh overtones, and the frequency with the highest amplitude can be identified as a dipole mode. The models required to fit the observed instability range need slightly less metallicity and a moderate enhancement of the helium abundance compared to the standard chemical composition. Our asteroseismic models suggest that HD 144277 is a delta Scuti star close to the ZAMS with a mass of 1.66 solar masses.
  • HD 46375 is known to host a Saturn-like exoplanet orbiting at 0.04 AU from its host star. Stellar light reflected by the planet was tentatively identified in the 34-day CoRoT run acquired in October-November 2008. We constrain the properties of the magnetic field of HD 46375 based on spectropolarimetric observations with the NARVAL spectrograph at the Pic du Midi observatory. In addition, we use a high-resolution NARVAL flux spectrum to contrain the atmospheric parameters. With these constraints, we perform an asteroseismic analysis and modelling of HD 46375 using the frequencies extracted from the CoRoT light curve. We used Zeeman Doppler imaging to reconstruct the magnetic map of the stellar surface. In the spectroscopic analysis we fitted isolated lines using 1D LTE atmosphere models. This analysis was used to constrain the effective temperature, surface gravity, and chemical composition of the star. To extract information about the p-mode oscillations, we used a technique based on the envelope autocorrelation function (EACF). From the Zeeman Doppler imaging observations, we observe a magnetic field of ~5 gauss. From the spectral analysis, HD 46375 is inferred to be an unevolved K0 type star with high metallicity [Fe/H]=+0.39. Owing to the relative faintness of the star (m_hip=8.05), the signal-to-noise ratio is too low to identify individual modes. However, we measure the p-mode excess power and large separation Delta nu_0=153.0 +/- 0.7 muHz. We are able do constrain the fundamental parameters of the star thanks to spectrometric and seismic analyses. We conclude that HD 46375 is similar to a young version of Alpha-CenB. This work is of special interest because of its combination of exoplanetary science and asteroseismology, which are the subjects of the current Kepler mission and the proposed PLATO mission.