• The Birmingham Solar-Oscillations Network (BiSON) has been operating with a full complement of six stations since 1992. Over 20 years later, we look back on the network history. The meta-data from the sites have been analysed to assess performance in terms of site insolation, with a brief look at the challenges that have been encountered over the years. We explain how the international community can gain easy access to the ever-growing dataset produced by the network, and finally look to the future of the network and the potential impact of nearly 25 years of technology miniaturisation.
  • We present a new and up-to-date analysis of the solar low-degree $p$-mode parameter shifts from the Birmingham Solar-Oscillations Network (BiSON) over the past 22 years, up to the end of 2014. We aim to demonstrate that they are not dominated by changes in the asymmetry of the resonant peak profiles of the modes and that the previously published results on the solar-cycle variations of mode parameters are reliable. We compare the results obtained using a conventional maximum likelihood estimation algorithm and a new one based on the Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) technique, both taking into account mode asymmetry. We assess the reliability of the solar-cycle trends seen in the data by applying the same analysis to artificially generated spectra. We find that the two methods are in good agreement. Both methods accurately reproduce the input frequency shifts in the artificial data and underestimate the amplitude and width changes by a small amount, around 10 per cent. We confirm earlier findings that the frequency and line width are positively correlated, and the mode amplitude anticorrelated, with the level of solar activity, with the energy supplied to the modes remaining essentially unchanged. For the mode asymmetry the correlation with activity is marginal, but the MCMC algorithm gives more robust results than the MLE. The magnitude of the parameter shifts is consistent with earlier work. There is no evidence that the frequency changes we see arise from changes in the asymmetry, which would need to be much larger than those observed in order to give the observed frequency shift.
  • We present a study of 33 {\it Kepler} planet-candidate host stars for which asteroseismic observations have sufficiently high signal-to-noise ratio to allow extraction of individual pulsation frequencies. We implement a new Bayesian scheme that is flexible in its input to process individual oscillation frequencies, combinations of them, and average asteroseismic parameters, and derive robust fundamental properties for these targets. Applying this scheme to grids of evolutionary models yields stellar properties with median statistical uncertainties of 1.2\% (radius), 1.7\% (density), 3.3\% (mass), 4.4\% (distance), and 14\% (age), making this the exoplanet host-star sample with the most precise and uniformly determined fundamental parameters to date. We assess the systematics from changes in the solar abundances and mixing-length parameter, showing that they are smaller than the statistical errors. We also determine the stellar properties with three other fitting algorithms and explore the systematics arising from using different evolution and pulsation codes, resulting in 1\% in density and radius, and 2\% and 7\% in mass and age, respectively. We confirm previous findings of the initial helium abundance being a source of systematics comparable to our statistical uncertainties, and discuss future prospects for constraining this parameter by combining asteroseismology and data from space missions. Finally we compare our derived properties with those obtained using the global average asteroseismic observables along with effective temperature and metallicity, finding an excellent level of agreement. Owing to selection effects, our results show that the majority of the high signal-to-noise ratio asteroseismic {\it Kepler} host stars are older than the Sun.
  • Kepler ultra-high precision photometry of long and continuous observations provides a unique dataset in which surface rotation and variability can be studied for thousands of stars. Because many of these old field stars also have independently measured asteroseismic ages, measurements of rotation and activity are particularly interesting in the context of age-rotation-activity relations. In particular, age-rotation relations generally lack good calibrators at old ages, a problem that this Kepler sample of old-field stars is uniquely suited to address. We study the surface rotation and photometric magnetic activity of a subset of 540 solar-like stars on the main- sequence and the subgiant branch for which stellar pulsations have been measured. The rotation period was determined by comparing the results from two different analysis methods: i) the projection onto the frequency domain of the time-period analysis, and ii) the autocorrelation function (ACF) of the light curves. Reliable surface rotation rates were then extracted by comparing the results from two different sets of calibrated data and from the two complementary analyses. We report rotation periods for 310 out of 540 targets (excluding known binaries and candidate planet-host stars); our measurements span a range of 1 to 100 days. The photometric magnetic activity levels of these stars were computed, and for 61.5% of the dwarfs, this level is similar to the range, from minimum to maximum, of the solar magnetic activity. We demonstrate that hot dwarfs, cool dwarfs, and subgiants have very different rotation-age relationships, highlighting the importance of separating out distinct populations when interpreting stellar rotation periods. Our sample of cool dwarf stars with age and metallicity data of the highest quality is consistent with gyrochronology relations reported in the literature.
  • The detection of oscillations with a mixed character in subgiants and red giants allows us to probe the physical conditions in their cores. With these mixed modes, we aim at determining seismic markers of stellar evolution. Kepler asteroseismic data were selected to map various evolutionary stages and stellar masses. Seismic evolutionary tracks were then drawn with the combination of the frequency and period spacings. We measured the asymptotic period spacing for more than 1170 stars at various evolutionary stages. This allows us to monitor stellar evolution from the main sequence to the asymptotic giant branch and draw seismic evolutionary tracks. We present clear quantified asteroseismic definitions that characterize the change in the evolutionary stages, in particular the transition from the subgiant stage to the early red giant branch, and the end of the horizontal branch.The seismic information is so precise that clear conclusions can be drawn independently of evolution models. The quantitative seismic information can now be used for stellar modeling, especially for studying the energy transport in the helium-burning core or for specifying the inner properties of stars entering the red or asymptotic giant branches. Modeling will also allow us to study stars that are identified to be in the helium-subflash stage, high-mass stars either arriving or quitting the secondary clump, or stars that could be in the blue-loop stage.
  • Recently the number of main-sequence and subgiant stars exhibiting solar-like oscillations that are resolved into individual mode frequencies has increased dramatically. While only a few such data sets were available for detailed modeling just a decade ago, the Kepler mission has produced suitable observations for hundreds of new targets. This rapid expansion in observational capacity has been accompanied by a shift in analysis and modeling strategies to yield uniform sets of derived stellar properties more quickly and easily. We use previously published asteroseismic and spectroscopic data sets to provide a uniform analysis of 42 solar-type Kepler targets from the Asteroseismic Modeling Portal (AMP). We find that fitting the individual frequencies typically doubles the precision of the asteroseismic radius, mass and age compared to grid-based modeling of the global oscillation properties, and improves the precision of the radius and mass by about a factor of three over empirical scaling relations. We demonstrate the utility of the derived properties with several applications.
  • In the age of Kepler and Corot, extended observations have provided estimates of stellar pulsation frequencies that have achieved new levels of precision, regularly exceeding fractional levels of a few parts in $10^{4}$. These high levels of precision now in principle exceed the point where one can ignore the Doppler shift of pulsation frequencies caused by the motion of a star relative to the observer. We present a correction for these Doppler shifts and use previously published pulsation frequencies to demonstrate the significance of the effect. We suggest that reported pulsation frequencies should be routinely corrected for stellar line-of-sight velocity Doppler shifts, or if a line-of-sight velocity estimate is not available, the frame of reference in which the frequencies are reported should be clearly stated.
  • We report a time-series analysis of satellite photometry of the non-radially pulsating Oe star zeta Oph, principally using data from SMEI obtained 2003--2008, but augmented with MOST and WIRE results. Amplitudes of the strongest photometric signals, at 5.18, 2.96, and 2.67/d, each vary independently over the 6-year monitoring period (from ca. 30 to <2 mmag at 5.18/d), on timescales of hundreds of days. Signals at 7.19/d and 5.18/d have persisted (or recurred) for around two decades. Supplementary spectroscopic observations show an H-alpha emission episode in 2006; this coincided with small increases in amplitudes of the three strongest photometric signals.
  • The continuous high-precision photometric observations provided by the CoRoT and Kepler space missions have allowed us to better understand the structure and dynamics of red giants using asteroseismic techniques. A small fraction of these stars shows dipole modes with unexpectedly low amplitudes. The reduction in amplitude is more pronounced for stars with higher frequency of maximum power. In this work we want to characterize KIC 8561221 in order to confirm that it is currently the least evolved star among this peculiar subset and to discuss several hypotheses that could help explain the reduction of the dipole mode amplitudes. We used Kepler short- and long-cadence data combined with spectroscopic observations to infer the stellar structure and dynamics of KIC 8561221. We then discussed different scenarios that could contribute to the reduction of the dipole amplitudes such as a fast rotating interior or the effect of a magnetic field on the properties of the modes. We also performed a detailed study of the inertia and damping of the modes. We have been able to characterize 37 oscillations modes, in particular, a few dipole modes above nu_max that exhibit nearly normal amplitudes. We have inferred a surface rotation period of around 91 days and uncovered the existence of a variation in the surface magnetic activity during the last 4 years. As expected, the internal regions of the star probed by the l = 2 and 3 modes spin 4 to 8 times faster than the surface. With our grid of standard models we are able to properly fit the observed frequencies. Our model calculation of mode inertia and damping give no explanation for the depressed dipole modes. A fast rotating core is also ruled out as a possible explanation. Finally, we do not have any observational evidence of the presence of a strong deep magnetic field inside the star.
  • Asteroseismology, i.e. the study of the internal structures of stars via their global oscillations, is a valuable tool to obtain stellar parameters such as mass, radius, surface gravity and mean density. These parameters can be obtained using certain scaling relations which are based on an asymptotic approximation. Usually the observed oscillation parameters are assumed to follow these scaling relations. Recently, it has been questioned whether this is a valid approach, i.e., whether the order of the observed oscillation modes are high enough to be approximated with an asymptotic theory. In this work we use stellar models to investigate whether the differences between observable oscillation parameters and their asymptotic estimates are indeed significant. We compute the asymptotic values directly from the stellar models and derive the observable values from adiabatic pulsation calculations of the same models. We find that the extent to which the atmosphere is included in the models is a key parameter. Considering a larger extension of the atmosphere beyond the photosphere reduces the difference between the asymptotic and observable values of the large frequency separation. Therefore, we conclude that the currently suggested discrepancies in the scaling relations might have been overestimated. Hence, based on the results presented here we believe that the suggestions of Mosser et al. (2013) should not be followed without careful consideration.
  • Context: Asteroseismic surface gravity values can be of importance in determining spectroscopic stellar parameters. The independent log(g) value from asteroseismology can be used as a fixed value in the spectroscopic analysis to reduce uncertainties due to the fact that log(g) and effective temperature can not be determined independently from spectra. Since 2012, a combined analysis of seismically and spectroscopically derived stellar properties is ongoing for a large survey with SDSS/APOGEE and Kepler. Therefore, knowledge of any potential biases and uncertainties in asteroseismic log(g) values is now becoming important. Aims: The seismic parameter needed to derive log(g) is the frequency of maximum oscillation power (nu_max). Here, we investigate the influence of nu_max derived with different methods on the derived log(g) values. The large frequency separation between modes of the same degree and consecutive radial orders (Dnu) is often used as an additional constraint for the determination of log(g). Additionally, we checked the influence of small corrections applied to Dnu on the derived values of log(g). Methods We use methods extensively described in the literature to determine nu_max and Dnu together with seismic scaling relations and grid-based modeling to derive log(g). Results: We find that different approaches to derive oscillation parameters give results for log(g) with small, but different, biases for red-clump and red-giant-branch stars. These biases are well within the quoted uncertainties of ~0.01 dex (cgs). Corrections suggested in the literature to the Dnu scaling relation have no significant effect on log(g). However somewhat unexpectedly, method specific solar reference values induce biases of the order of the uncertainties, which is not the case when canonical solar reference values are used.
  • The numerous results obtained with asteroseismology thanks to space missions such as CoRoT and Kepler are providing a new insight on stellar evolution. After five years of observations, CoRoT is going on providing high-quality data. We present here the analysis of the double star HD169392 complemented by ground-based spectroscopic observations. This work aims at characterizing the fundamental parameters of the two stars, their chemical composition, the acoustic-mode global parameters including their individual frequencies, and their dynamics. We have analysed HARPS observations of the two stars to retrieve their chemical compositions. Several methods have been used and compared to measure the global properties of acoustic modes and their individual frequencies from the photometric data of CoRoT. The new spectroscopic observations and archival astrometric values suggest that HD169392 is a wide binary system weakly bounded. We have obtained the spectroscopic parameters for both components, suggesting the origin from the same cloud. However, only the mode signature of HD169392 A has been measured within the CoRoT data. The signal-to-noise ratio of the modes in HD169392B is too low to allow any confident detection. We were able to extract mode parameters of modes for l=0, 1, 2, and 3. The study of the splittings and inclination angle gives two possible solutions with splittings and inclination angles of 0.4-1.0 muHz and 20-40 degrees for one case and 0.2-0.5 muHz and 55-86 degrees for the other case. The modeling of this star with the Asteroseismic Modeling Portal led to a mass of 1.15+/-0.01 Ms, a radius of 1.88+/-0.02 Rs, and an age of 4.33+/-0.12 Gyr, where the uncertainties are the internal ones.
  • The V=4.48 F4 main-sequence star theta Cyg is the brightest star observable in the Kepler spacecraft field-of-view. Short-cadence (58.8 s) photometric data were obtained by Kepler during 2010 June-September. Preliminary analysis shows solar-like oscillations in the frequency range 1200- 2500 microHz. To interpret these data and to motivate further observations, we use observational constraints from the literature to construct stellar evolution and pulsation models for this star. We compare the observed large frequency separation of the solar-like oscillations with the model predictions, and discuss the prospects for gamma Doradus-like g-mode pulsations, given the observational constraints. We discuss the value of angular diameter measurements from optical interferometry for constraining stellar properties and the implications for asteroseismology.
  • We aim to describe the oscillation power excess observed in Kepler red giants, and to investigate empirical scaling relations governing these parameters. From these scalings relations, we derive new physical properties of red giant oscillations. Various different methods were compared in order to validate the processes and to derive reliable output values. For consistency, a single method was then used to determine scaling relations for the relevant global asteroseismic parameters: mean mode height, mean height of the background signal superimposed on the oscillation power excess, width of the power excess, bolometric amplitude of the radial modes and visibility of non-radial modes. A method for deriving oscillation amplitudes is proposed, which relies on the complete identification of the red giant oscillation spectrum. The comparison of the different methods has shown the important role of the way the background is modelled. The convergence reached by the collaborative work enables us to derive significant results concerning the oscillation power excess. We obtain several scaling relations, and identify the influence of the stellar mass and the evolutionary status. The effect of helium burning on the red giant interior structure is confirmed: it yields a strong mass-radius relation for clump stars. We find that none of the amplitude scaling relations motivated by physical considerations predict the observed mode amplitudes of red giant stars. In parallel, the degree-dependent mode visibility exhibits important variations. Both effects seem related to the significant influence of the high mode mass of non-radial mixed modes. A family of red giants with very weak dipole modes is identified, and its properties are analyzed.
  • Having started science operations in May 2009, the Kepler photometer has been able to provide exquisite data of solar-like stars. Five out of the 42 stars observed continuously during the survey phase show evidence of oscillations, even though they are rather faint (magnitudes from 10.5 to 12). In this paper, we present an overview of the results of the seismic analysis of 4 of these stars observed during more than eight months.
  • The large frequency separation between modes of the same degree and consecutive orders in a star is approximately proportional to the square root of its mean density. To determine the large frequency separation as accurately as possible a mean large frequency separation computed over several orders is often used. It is, however, known that the large frequency separation varies with frequency in a second order effect. From observations it has been shown that this frequency dependence is more important for main-sequence stars than it is for red-giant stars. Here we use YREC models to verify and explain this observational result. We find that for stars with R > 8 Rsun the effect of the Helium second ionisation zone is relatively small. For these stars the deep location of the He II zone induces a frequency modulation covering only a few large separations, while the amplitude of the modulation is low due to the relatively weak and extended He II layer, causing a shallow wide depression in the first adiabatic exponent. For less evolved stars the He II zone is located closer to the surface, and it is more confined, i.e. a deep narrow depression in the first adiabatic exponent. This causes frequency modulations with relatively high amplitudes covering up to about 20 large separations, inducing a relatively large frequency modulation. Additionally, we find that for less evolved stars the He II zone is stronger and more localised for more massive stars and for stars with low metallicities further increasing the amplitude of the frequency modulation.
  • The successful launches of the CoRoT and Kepler space missions have led to the detections of solar-like oscillations in large samples of red-giant stars. The large numbers of red giants with observed oscillations make it possible to investigate the properties of the sample as a whole: ensemble asteroseismology. In this article we summarise ensemble asteroseismology results obtained from data released by the Kepler Science Team (~150,000 field stars) as presented by Hekker et al. (2011b) and for the clusters NGC 6791, NGC 6811 and NGC 6819 (Hekker et al. 2011a) and we discuss the importance of such studies.
  • Context: Four open clusters are present in the Kepler field of view and timeseries of nearly a year in length are now available. These timeseries allow us to derive asteroseismic global oscillation parameters of red-giant stars in the three open clusters NGC 6791, NGC 6819 and NGC 6811. From these parameters and effective temperatures, we derive mass, radii and luminosities for the clusters as well as field red giants. Aims: We study the influence of evolution and metallicity on the observed red-giant populations. Methods: The global oscillation parameters are derived using different published methods and the effective temperatures are derived from 2MASS colours. The observational results are compared with BaSTI evolution models. Results: We find that the mass has significant influence on the asteroseismic quantities delta_nu vs. nu_max relation, while the influence of metallicity is negligible, under the assumption that the metallicity does not affect the excitation / damping of the oscillations. The positions of the stars in the H-R diagram depend on both mass and metallicity. Furthermore, the stellar masses derived for the field stars are bracketed by those of the cluster stars. Conclusions: Both the mass and metallicity contribute to the observed difference in locations in the H-R diagram of the old metal-rich cluster NGC 6791 and the middle-aged solar-metallicity cluster NGC 6819. For the young cluster NGC 6811, the explanation of the position of the stars in the H-R diagram challenges the assumption of solar metallicity, and this open cluster might have significantly lower metallicity [Fe/H] in the range -0.3 to -0.7 dex. Also, nearly all the observed field stars seem to be older than NGC 6811 and younger than NGC 6791.
  • We analyze the photometric short-cadence data obtained with the Kepler Mission during the first eight months of observations of two solar-type stars of spectral types G and F: KIC 11395018 and KIC 11234888 respectively, the latter having a lower signal-to-noise ratio compared to the former. We estimate global parameters of the acoustic (p) modes such as the average large and small frequency separations, the frequency of the maximum of the p-mode envelope and the average linewidth of the acoustic modes. We were able to identify and to measure 22 p-mode frequencies for the first star and 16 for the second one even though the signal-to-noise ratios of these stars are rather low. We also derive some information about the stellar rotation periods from the analyses of the low-frequency parts of the power spectral densities. A model-independent estimation of the mean density, mass and radius are obtained using the scaling laws. We emphasize the importance of continued observations for the stars with low signal-to-noise ratio for an improved characterization of the oscillation modes. Our results offer a preview of what will be possible for many stars with the long data sets obtained during the remainder of the mission.
  • The Kepler mission is providing photometric data of exquisite quality for the asteroseismic study of different classes of pulsating stars. These analyses place particular demands on the pre-processing of the data, over a range of timescales from minutes to months. Here, we describe processing procedures developed by the Kepler Asteroseismic Science Consortium (KASC) to prepare light curves that are optimized for the asteroseismic study of solar-like oscillating stars in which outliers, jumps and drifts are corrected.
  • The first public release of long-cadence stellar photometric data collected by the NASA Kepler mission has now been made available. In this paper we characterise the red-giant (G-K) stars in this large sample in terms of their solar-like oscillations. We use published methods and well-known scaling relations in the analysis. Just over 70% of the red giants in the sample show detectable solar-like oscillations, and from these oscillations we are able to estimate the fundamental properties of the stars. This asteroseismic analysis reveals different populations: low-luminosity H-shell burning red-giant branch stars, cool high-luminosity red giants on the red-giant branch and He-core burning clump and secondary-clump giants.
  • We have studied solar cycle changes in the large frequency separations that can be observed in Birmingham Solar Oscillations Network (BiSON) data. The large frequency separation is often one of the first outputs from asteroseismic studies because it can help constrain stellar properties like mass and radius. We have used three methods for estimating the large separations: use of individual p-mode frequencies, computation of the autocorrelation of frequency-power spectra, and computation of the power spectrum of the power spectrum. The values of the large separations obtained by the different methods are offset from each other and have differing sensitivities to the realization noise. A simple model was used to predict solar cycle variations in the large separations, indicating that the variations are due to the well-known solar cycle changes to mode frequency. However, this model is only valid over a restricted frequency range. We discuss the implications of these results for asteroseismology.
  • Clear power excess in a frequency range typical for solar-type oscillations in red giants has been detected in more than 1000 stars, which have been observed during the first 138 days of the science operation of the NASA Kepler satellite. This sample includes stars in a wide mass and radius range with spectral types G and K, extending in luminosity from the bottom of the giant branch up to high-luminous red giants. The high-precision asteroseismic observations with Kepler provide a perfect source for testing stellar structure and evolutionary models, as well as investigating the stellar population in our Galaxy. We fit a global model to the observed frequency spectra, which allows us to accurately estimate the granulation background signal and the global oscillation parameters, such as the frequency of maximum oscillation power. We find regular patterns of radial and non-radial oscillation modes and use a new technique to automatically identify the mode degree and the characteristic frequency separations between consecutive modes of the same spherical degree. In most cases, we can also measure the small separation. The seismic parameters are used to estimate stellar masses and radii and to place the stars in an H-R diagram by using an extensive grid of stellar models that covers a wide parameter range. Using Bayesian techniques throughout our analysis allows us to determine reliable uncertainties for all parameters. We provide accurate seismic parameters and their uncertainties for a large sample of red giants and determine their asteroseismic fundamental parameters. We investigate the influence of the stars' metallicities on their positions in the H-R diagram. We study the red-giant populations in the red clump and bump and compare them to a synthetic population and find a mass and metallicity gradient in the red clump and clear evidence of a secondary-clump population.
  • The primary science goal of the Kepler Mission is to provide a census of exoplanets in the solar neighborhood, including the identification and characterization of habitable Earth-like planets. The asteroseismic capabilities of the mission are being used to determine precise radii and ages for the target stars from their solar-like oscillations. Chaplin et al. (2010) published observations of three bright G-type stars, which were monitored during the first 33.5 days of science operations. One of these stars, the subgiant KIC 11026764, exhibits a characteristic pattern of oscillation frequencies suggesting that it has evolved significantly. We have derived asteroseismic estimates of the properties of KIC 11026764 from Kepler photometry combined with ground-based spectroscopic data. We present the results of detailed modeling for this star, employing a variety of independent codes and analyses that attempt to match the asteroseismic and spectroscopic constraints simultaneously. We determine both the radius and the age of KIC 11026764 with a precision near 1%, and an accuracy near 2% for the radius and 15% for the age. Continued observations of this star promise to reveal additional oscillation frequencies that will further improve the determination of its fundamental properties.
  • The large number of stars for which uninterrupted high-precision photometric timeseries data are being collected with \textit{Kepler} and CoRoT initiated the development of automated methods to analyse the stochastically excited oscillations in main-sequence, subgiant and red-giant stars. Aims: We investigate the differences in results for global oscillation parameters of G and K red-giant stars due to different methods and definitions. We also investigate uncertainties originating from the stochastic nature of the oscillations. Methods: For this investigation we use Kepler data obtained during the first four months of operation. These data have been analysed by different groups using already published methods and the results are compared. We also performed simulations to investigate the uncertainty on the resulting parameters due to different realizations of the stochastic signal. Results: We obtain results for the frequency of maximum oscillation power (nu_max) and the mean large separation (<delta nu>) from different methods for over one thousand red-giant stars. The results for these parameters agree within a few percent and seem therefore robust to the different analysis methods and definitions used here. The uncertainties for nu_max and <delta nu> due to differences in realization noise are not negligible and should be taken into account when using these results for stellar modelling.