• We report low temperature muon spin relaxation (muSR) measurements of the high-transition-temperature (Tc) cuprate superconductors Bi{2+x}Sr{2-x}CaCu2O{8+\delta} and YBa2Cu3O6.57, aimed at detecting the mysterious intra-unit cell (IUC) magnetic order that has been observed by spin polarized neutron scattering in the pseudogap phase of four different cuprate families. A lack of confirmation by local magnetic probe methods has raised the possibility that the magnetic order fluctuates slowly enough to appear static on the time scale of neutron scattering, but too fast to affect $\mu$SR or nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signals. The IUC magnetic order has been linked to a theoretical model for the cuprates, which predicts a long-range ordered phase of electron-current loop order that terminates at a quantum crictical point (QCP). Our study suggests that lowering the temperature to T ~ 25 mK and moving far below the purported QCP does not cause enough of a slowing down of fluctuations for the IUC magnetic order to become detectable on the time scale of muSR. Our measurements place narrow limits on the fluctuation rate of this unidentified magnetic order.
  • Observing how electronic states in solids react to a local symmetry breaking provides insight into their microscopic nature. A striking example is the formation of bound states when quasiparticles are scattered off defects. This is known to occur, under specific circumstances, in some metals and superconductors but not, in general, in the charge-density-wave (CDW) state. Here, we report the unforeseen observation of bound states when a magnetic field quenches superconductivity and induces long-range CDW order in YBa$_2$Cu$_3$O$_y$. Bound states indeed produce an inhomogeneous pattern of the local density of states $N(E_F)$ that leads to a skewed distribution of Knight shifts which is detected here through an asymmetric profile of $^{17}$O NMR lines. We argue that the effect arises most likely from scattering off defects in the CDW state, which provides a novel case of disorder-induced bound states in a condensed-matter system and an insightful window into charge ordering in the cuprates.
  • We show that 63Cu NMR spectra place strong constraints on both the nature and the concentration of oxygen defects in ortho-II YBa2Cu3Oy. Systematic deviation from ideal ortho-II order is revealed by the presence of inequivalent Cu sites in either full or empty chains. The results can be explained by two kinds of defects: oxygen clustering into additional chains, or fragments thereof, most likely present at all concentrations (6.4<y<6.6) and oxygen vacancies randomly distributed in the full chains for y<6.50 only. Furthermore, the remarkable reproducibility of the spectra in different samples with optimal ortho-II order (y=6.55) shows that chain-oxygen disorder, known to limit electronic coherence, is ineluctable because it is inherent to these compounds.
  • The condensation of an electron superfluid from a conventional metallic state at a critical temperature $T_c$ is described well by the BCS theory. In the underdoped copper-oxides, high-temperature superconductivity condenses instead from a nonconventional metallic "pseudogap" phase that exhibits a variety of non-Fermi liquid properties. Recently, it has become clear that a charge density wave (CDW) phase exists within the pseudogap regime, appearing at a temperature $T_{CDW}$ just above $T_c$. The near coincidence of $T_c$ and $T_{CDW}$, as well the coexistence and competition of CDW and superconducting order below $T_c$, suggests that they are intimately related. Here we show that the condensation of the superfluid from this unconventional precursor is reflected in deviations from the predictions of BSC theory regarding the recombination rate of quasiparticles. We report a detailed investigation of the quasiparticle (QP) recombination lifetime, $\tau_{qp}$, as a function of temperature and magnetic field in underdoped HgBa$_{2}$CuO$_{4+\delta}$ (Hg-1201) and YBa$_{2}$Cu$_{3}$O$_{6+x}$ (YBCO) single crystals by ultrafast time-resolved reflectivity. We find that $\tau_{qp}(T)$ exhibits a local maximum in a small temperature window near $T_c$ that is prominent in underdoped samples with coexisting charge order and vanishes with application of a small magnetic field. We explain this unusual, non-BCS behavior by positing that $T_c$ marks a transition from phase-fluctuating SC/CDW composite order above to a SC/CDW condensate below. Our results suggest that the superfluid in underdoped cuprates is a condensate of coherently-mixed particle-particle and particle-hole pairs.
  • Neutron scattering from high-quality YBa2Cu3O6.33 (YBCO6.33) single crystals with a Tc of 8.4 K shows no evidence of a coexistence of superconductivity with long-range antiferromagnetic order at this very low, near-critical doping of p~0.055. However, we find short-range three dimensional spin correlations that develop at temperatures much higher than Tc. Their intensity increases smoothly on cooling and shows no anomaly that might signify a Neel transition. The system remains subcritical with spins correlated over only one and a half unit cells normal to the planes. At low energies the short-range spin response is static on the microvolt scale. The excitations out of this ground state give rise to an overdamped spectrum with a relaxation rate of 3 meV. The transition to the superconducting state below Tc has no effect on the spin correlations. The elastic interplanar spin response extends over a length that grows weakly but fails to diverge as doping is moved towards the superconducting critical point. Any antiferromagnetic critical point likely lies outside the superconducting dome. The observations suggest that conversion from Neel long-range order to a spin glass texture is a prerequisite to formation of paired superconducting charges. We show that while pc =0.052 is a critical doping for superconducting pairing, it is not for spin order.
  • The pseudogap regime of high-temperature cuprates harbours diverse manifestations of electronic ordering whose exact nature and universality remain debated. Here, we show that the short-ranged charge order recently reported in the normal state of YBa2Cu3Oy corresponds to a truly static modulation of the charge density. We also show that this modulation impacts on most electronic properties, that it appears jointly with intra-unit-cell nematic, but not magnetic, order, and that it exhibits differences with the charge density wave observed at lower temperatures in high magnetic fields. These observations prove mostly universal, they place new constraints on the origin of the charge density wave and they reveal that the charge modulation is pinned by native defects. Similarities with results in layered metals such as NbSe2, in which defects nucleate halos of incipient charge density wave at temperatures above the ordering transition, raise the possibility that order-parameter fluctuations, but no static order, would be observed in the normal state of most cuprates if disorder were absent.
  • Evidence is mounting that charge order competes with superconductivity in high Tc cuprates. Whether this has any relationship to the pairing mechanism is unknown since neither the universality of the competition nor its microscopic nature has been established. Here using nuclear magnetic resonance, we show that, similar to La214, charge order in YBCO has maximum strength inside the superconducting dome, at doping levels p = 0.11 - 0.12.We further show that the overlap of halos of incipient charge order around vortex cores, similar to those visualised in Bi2212, can explain the threshold magnetic field at which long-range charge order emerges. These results reveal universal features of a competition in which charge order and superconductivity appear as joint instabilities of the same normal state, whose relative balance can be field-tuned in the vortex state.
  • Defects in LiFeAs are studied by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and spectroscopy (STS). Topographic images of the five predominant defects allow the identification of their position within the lattice. The most commonly observed defect is associated with an Fe site and does not break the local lattice symmetry, exhibiting a bound state near the edge of the smaller gap in this multi-gap superconductor. Three other common defects, including one also on an Fe site, are observed to break local lattice symmetry and are pair-breaking indicated by clear in-gap bound states, in addition to states near the smaller gap edge. STS maps reveal complex, extended real-space bound state patterns, including one with a chiral distribution of the local density of states (LDOS). The multiple bound state resonances observed within the gaps and at the inner gap edge are consistent with theoretical predictions for s$^{\pm}$ gap symmetry proposed for LiFeAs and other iron pnictides.
  • Electronic charges introduced in copper-oxide planes generate high-transition temperature superconductivity but, under special circumstances, they can also order into filaments called stripes. Whether an underlying tendency of charges to order is present in all cuprates and whether this has any relationship with superconductivity are, however, two highly controversial issues. In order to uncover underlying electronic orders, magnetic fields strong enough to destabilise superconductivity can be used. Such experiments, including quantum oscillations in YBa2Cu3Oy (a notoriously clean cuprate where charge order is not observed) have suggested that superconductivity competes with spin, rather than charge, order. Here, using nuclear magnetic resonance, we demonstrate that high magnetic fields actually induce charge order, without spin order, in the CuO2 planes of YBa2Cu3Oy. The observed static, unidirectional, modulation of the charge density breaks translational symmetry, thus explaining quantum oscillation results, and we argue that it is most likely the same 4a-periodic modulation as in stripe-ordered cuprates. The discovery that it develops only when superconductivity fades away and near the same 1/8th hole doping as in La2-xBaxCuO4 suggests that charge order, although visibly pinned by CuO chains in YBa2Cu3Oy, is an intrinsic propensity of the superconducting planes of high Tc cuprates.
  • Charges in cold, multiple-species, non-neutral plasmas separate radially by mass, forming centrifugally-separated states. Here, we report the first detailed measurements of such states in an electron-antiproton plasma, and the first observations of the separation dynamics in any centrifugally-separated system. While the observed equilibrium states are expected and in agreement with theory, the equilibration time is approximately constant over a wide range of parameters, a surprising and as yet unexplained result. Electron-antiproton plasmas play a crucial role in antihydrogen trapping experiments.
  • We have measured the spin fluctuations in the YBa2Cu3O6.5 (YBCO6.5, Tc=59 K) superconductor at high-energy transfers above ~ 100 meV. Within experimental error, the momentum dependence is isotropic at high-energies, similar to that measured in the insulator for two dimensional spin waves, and the dispersion extrapolates back to the incommensurate wave vector at the elastic position. This result contrasts with previous expectations based on measurements around 50 meV which were suggestive of a softening of the spin-wave velocity with increased hole doping. Unlike the insulator, we observe a significant reduction in the intensity of the spin excitations for energy transfers above ~ 100 meV similar to that observed above ~ 200 meV in the YBCO6.35 (Tc=18 K) superconductor as the spin waves approach the zone boundary. We attribute this high energy scale with a second gap and find agreement with measurements of the pseudogap in the cuprates associated with electronic anomalies along the antinodal positions. In addition, we observe a sharp peak at around 400 meV whose energy softens with increased hole doping. We discuss possible origins of this excitation including a hydrogen related molecular excitation and a transition of electronic states between d levels.
  • Measurements of quantum oscillations in the cuprate superconductors afford a new opportunity to assess the extent to which the electronic properties of these materials yield to a description rooted in Fermi liquid theory. However, such an analysis is hampered by the small number of oscillatory periods observed. Here we employ a genetic algorithm to globally model the field, angular, and temperature dependence of the quantum oscillations observed in the resistivity of YBa2Cu3O6.59. This approach successfully fits an entire data set to a Fermi surface comprised of two small, quasi-2-dimensional cylinders. A key feature of the data is the first identification of the effect of Zeeman splitting, which separates spin-up and spin-down contributions, indicating that the quasiparticles in the cuprates behave as nearly free spins, constraining the source of the Fermi surface reconstruction to something other than a conventional spin density wave with moments parallel to the CuO2 planes.
  • Arguably the most intriguing aspect of the physics of cuprates is the close proximity between the record high-Tc superconductivity (HTSC) and the antiferromagnetic charge-transfer insulating state driven by Mott-like electron correlations. These are responsible for the intimate connection between high and low-energy scale physics, and their key role in the mechanism of HTSC was conjectured very early on. More recently, the detection of quantum oscillations in high-magnetic field experiments on YBa2Cu3O6+x (YBCO) has suggested the existence of a Fermi surface of well-defined quasiparticles in underdoped cuprates, lending support to the alternative proposal that HTSC might emerge from a Fermi liquid across the whole cuprate phase diagram. Discriminating between these orthogonal scenarios hinges on the quantitative determination of the elusive quasiparticle weight Z, over a wide range of hole-doping p. By means of angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) on in situ doped YBCO, and following the evolution of bilayer band-splitting, we show that the overdoped metal electronic structure (0.25<p<0.37) is in remarkable agreement with density functional theory and the Z=2p/(p+1) mean-field prediction. Below p~0.10-0.15, we observe the vanishing of the nodal quasiparticle weight Z_N; this marks a clear departure from Fermi liquid behaviour and -- consistent with dynamical mean-field theory -- is even a more rapid crossover to the Mott physics than expected for the doped resonating valence bond (RVB) spin liquid.
  • Antihydrogen production in a neutral atom trap formed by an octupole-based magnetic field minimum is demonstrated using field-ionization of weakly bound anti-atoms. Using our unique annihilation imaging detector, we correlate antihydrogen detection by imaging and by field-ionization for the first time. We further establish how field-ionization causes radial redistribution of the antiprotons during antihydrogen formation and use this effect for the first simultaneous measurements of strongly and weakly bound antihydrogen atoms. Distinguishing between these provides critical information needed in the process of optimizing for trappable antihydrogen. These observations are of crucial importance to the ultimate goal of performing CPT tests involving antihydrogen, which likely depends upon trapping the anti-atom.
  • We present muon spin relaxation (muSR) measurements on a large YBa2Cu3O6.6 single crystal in which two kinds of unusual magnetic order have been detected in the pseudogap region by neutron scattering. A comparison is made to measurements on smaller, higher quality YBa2Cu3Oy single crystals. One type of magnetic order is observed in all samples, but does not evolve significantly with hole doping. A second type of unusual magnetic order is observed only in the YBa2Cu3O6.6 single crystal. This magnetism has an ordered magnetic moment that is quantitatively consistent with the neutron experiments, but is confined to just a small volume of the sample (~ 3%). Our findings do not support theories that ascribe the pseudogap to a state characterized by loop-current order, but instead indicate that dilute impurity phases are the source of the unusual magnetic orders in YBa2Cu3Oy.
  • Shubnikov-de Haas and de Haas-van Alphen effects have been measured in the underdoped high temperature superconductor YBa$_2$Cu$_3$O$_{6.51}$. Data are in agreement with the standard Lifshitz-Kosevitch theory, which confirms the presence of a coherent Fermi surface in the ground state of underdoped cuprates. A low frequency $F = 530 \pm 10$ T is reported in both measurements, pointing to small Fermi pocket, which corresponds to 2% of the first Brillouin zone area only. This low value is in sharp contrast with that of overdoped Tl$_2$Ba$_2$CuO$_{6+\delta}$, where a high frequency $F = 18$ kT has been recently reported and corresponds to a large hole cylinder in agreement with band structure calculations. These results point to a radical change in the topology of the Fermi surface on opposing sides of the cuprate phase diagram.
  • By improving the experimental conditions and extensive data accumulation, we have achieved very high-precision in the measurements of the de Haas-van Alphen effect in the underdoped high-temperature superconductor YBa$_{2}$Cu$_{3}$O$_{6.5}$. We find that the main oscillation, so far believed to be single-frequency, is composed of three closely spaced frequencies. We attribute this to bilayer splitting and warping of a single quasi-2D Fermi surface, indicating that \emph{c}-axis coherence is restored at low temperature in underdoped cuprates. Our results do not support the existence of a larger frequency of the order of 1650 T reported recently in the same compound [S.E. Sebastian {\it et al}., Nature {\bf 454}, 200 (2008)].
  • X-ray absorption spectroscopy on oxygen-annealed, self-flux-grown single crystals of Tl-2201 suggests a microscopic doping mechanism whereby interstitial oxygens are attracted to copper substituted on the thallium site, contributing holes to both the planes and to these coppers, and typically promoting only one hole to the plane rather than two. These copper substituents would provide an intrinsic hole doping. The evidence for this is discussed, along with an alternative interpretation.
  • Using neutron scattering, we investigate the effect of a magnetic field on the static and dynamic spin response in heavily underdoped superconducting YBa$_{2}$Cu$_{3}$O$_{6+x}$ (YBCO$_{6+x}$) with x=0.33 (T$_{c}$=8 K) and 0.35 (T$_{c}$=18 K). In contrast to the heavily doped and superconducting monolayer cuprates, the elastic central peak characterizing static spin correlations does not respond observably to a magnetic field which suppresses superconductivity. Instead, we find a magnetic field induced resonant enhancement of the spin fluctuations. The energy scale of the enhanced fluctuations matches the Zeeman energy within both the normal and vortex phases while the momentum dependence is the same as the zero field bilayer response. The magnitude of the enhancement is very similar in both phases with a fractional intensity change of $(I/I_{0}-1) \sim 0.1$. We suggest that the enhancement is not directly correlated with superconductivity but is the result of almost free spins located near hole rich regions.
  • We report that in YBa2Cu3Oy and La2-xSrxCuO4 there is a spatially inhomogeneous response to magnetic field for temperatures T extending well above the bulk superconducting transition temperature Tc. An inhomogeneous magnetic response is observed above Tc even in ortho-II YBa2Cu3O6.50, which has highly ordered doping. The degree of the field inhomogeneity above Tc tracks the hole doping dependences of both Tc and the density of the superconducting carriers below Tc, and therefore is apparently coupled to superconductivity.
  • We report results from a novel diagnostic that probes the outer radial profile of trapped antiproton clouds. The diagnostic allows us to determine the profile by monitoring the time-history of antiproton losses that occur as an octupole field in the antiproton confinement region is increased. We show several examples of how this diagnostic helps us to understand the radial dynamics of antiprotons in normal and nested Penning-Malmberg traps. Better understanding of these dynamics may aid current attempts to trap antihydrogen atoms.
  • Control of the radial profile of trapped antiproton clouds is critical to trapping antihydrogen. We report the first detailed measurements of the radial manipulation of antiproton clouds, including areal density compressions by factors as large as ten, by manipulating spatially overlapped electron plasmas. We show detailed measurements of the near-axis antiproton radial profile and its relation to that of the electron plasma.
  • We discuss aspects of antihydrogen studies, that relate to particle physics ideas and techniques, within the context of the ALPHA experiment at CERN's Antiproton Decelerator facility. We review the fundamental physics motivations for antihydrogen studies, and their potential physics reach. We argue that initial spectroscopy measurements, once antihydrogen is trapped, could provide competitive tests of CPT, possibly probing physics at the Planck Scale. We discuss some of the particle detection techniques used in ALPHA. Preliminary results from commissioning studies of a partial system of the ALPHA Si vertex detector are presented, the results of which highlight the power of annihilation vertex detection capability in antihydrogen studies.
  • The de Haas-van Alphen effect was observed in the underdoped cuprate YBa$_2$Cu$_3$O$_{6.5}$ via a torque technique in pulsed magnetic fields up to 59 T. Above an irreversibility field of $\sim$30 T, the magnetization exhibits clear quantum oscillations with a single frequency of 540 T and a cyclotron mass of 1.76 times the free electron mass, in excellent agreement with previously observed Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations. The oscillations obey the standard Lifshitz-Kosevich formula of Fermi-liquid theory. This thermodynamic observation of quantum oscillations confirms the existence of a well-defined, close and coherent, Fermi surface in the pseudogap phase of cuprates.
  • The discovery of quantum oscillations in the normal-state electrical resistivity of YBa2Cu3O6.5 provides the first evidence for the existence of Fermi surface (FS) pockets in an underdoped cuprate. However, the pockets' electron vs. hole character, and the very interpretation in terms of closed FS contours, are the subject of considerable debate. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES), with its ability to probe electronic dispersion as well as the FS, is ideally suited to address this issue. Unfortunately, the ARPES study of YBa2C3O7-d (YBCO) has been hampered by the technique's surface sensitivity. Here we show that this stems from the polarity and corresponding self-doping of the YBCO surface. By in-situ deposition of potassium atoms on the cleaved surface, we are able to continuously tune the doping of a single sample from the heavily overdoped to the underdoped regime. This reveals the progressive collapse of the normal-metal-like FS into four disconnected nodal FS arcs, or perhaps into hole but not electron pockets, in underdoped YBCO6.5.