• We report a comprehensive review of the UV-visible spectrum and rotational lightcurve of Vesta combining new observations by Hubble Space Telescope and Swift Gamma-ray Burst Observatory with archival International Ultraviolet Explorer observations. The geometric albedos of Vesta from 220 nm to 953 nm are derived by carefully comparing these observations from various instruments at different times and observing geometries. Vesta has a rotationally averaged geometric albedo of 0.09 at 250 nm, 0.14 at 300 nm, 0.26 at 373 nm, 0.38 at 673 nm, and 0.30 at 950 nm. The linear spectral slope as measured between 240 and 320 nm in the ultraviolet displays a sharp minimum near a sub-Earth longitude of 20^{\circ}, and maximum in the eastern hemisphere. This is consistent with the longitudinal distribution of the spectral slope in the visible wavelength. The photometric uncertainty in the ultraviolet is ~20%, and in the visible wavelengths it is better than 10%. The amplitude of Vesta's rotational lightcurves is ~10% throughout the range of wavelengths we observed, but is smaller at 950 nm (~6%) near the 1-\mum band center. Contrary to earlier reports, we found no evidence for any difference between the phasing of the ultraviolet and visible/near-infrared lightcurves with respect to sub-Earth longitude. Vesta's average spectrum between 220 and 950 nm can well be described by measured reflectance spectra of fine particle howardite-like materials of basaltic achondrite meteorites. Combining this with the in-phase behavior of the ultraviolet, visible, and near-infrared lightcurves, and the spectral slopes with respect to the rotational phase, we conclude that there is no global ultraviolet/visible reversal on Vesta. Consequently, this implies a lack of global space weathering on Vesta, as previously inferred from visible-near-infrared data.
  • We report early photospheric-phase observations of the Type IIP Supernova (SN) 2005cs obtained by Swift's Ultraviolet-Optical and X-Ray Telescopes. Observations started within two days of discovery and continued regularly for three weeks. During this time the V-band magnitude remained essentially constant, while the UV was initially bright but steadily faded until below the brightness of an underlying UV-bright HII region. This UV decay is similar to SNe II observed by the International Ultraviolet Explorer. UV grism spectra show the P-Cygni absorption of MgII 2798A, indicating a photospheric origin of the UV flux. Based on non-LTE model atmosphere calculations with the CMFGEN code, we associate the rapid evolution of the UV flux with the cooling of the ejecta, the peak of the spectral energy distribution (SED) shifting from ~700A on June 30th to ~1200A on July 5th. Furthermore, the corresponding recombination of the ejecta, e.g., the transition from FeIII to FeII, induces considerable strengthening of metal line-blanketing at and above the photosphere, blocking more effectively this fading UV flux. SN2005cs was not detected in X-rays, and the upper limit to the X-ray luminosity yields a limit to the mass loss rate of the progenitor of about 10^-5 solar masses per year. Overall, Swift presents a unique opportunity to capture the early and fast evolution of Type II SNe in the UV, providing additional constraints on the reddening, the SED shortward of 4000A, and the ionization state and temperature of the photon-decoupling regions.
  • We have obtained low-dispersion IUE spectra of the stars 56 Persei (F4 V) and HR 3643 (F7 II), as part of a survey of late-type stars with a 1565 A flux excess in the TD-1 ultraviolet sky survey. The IUE spectrum of each star reveals the presence of a hot white dwarf companion. We fit the Ly alpha profile and ultraviolet continuum using pure hydrogen models, but the distance of the primary star is also needed to uniquely constrain the white dwarf parameters. We derive Teff = 16,420 +- 420 K, logg = 8.46 +- 0.2 for the white dwarf companion to 56 Per, using the photometric distance of 30.1 +- 2.8 pc. The implied white dwarf mass is 0.90 +- 0.12 Msun, considerably above the median mass (~0.6 Msun) of single white dwarfs. The parameters of the white dwarf in HR 3643 are not well constrained, mainly due to a large uncertainty in the distance. By assuming a reasonable range of gravity for the white dwarf (7.3 < log g < 9.0), we derive -1.4 < Mv < 0.6 for the F7 II star, and 28,970 < Teff < 35,990 K for the white dwarf. Prompted by our detection of a white dwarf companion of a luminous F star, we have examined the IUE archives to assess the upper limits on possible white dwarf companions to Cepheids. The detection of a Cepheid -- white dwarf binary would provide important insights concerning the most massive progenitors of white dwarfs. Only for the cases of Alp UMi and Beta Dor are existing IUE spectra of Cepheids sufficiently deep to rule out the presence of a white dwarf companion.