• Crystal symmetry plays a central role in governing a wide range of fundamental physical phenomena. One example is the nonlinear optical second harmonic generation (SHG), which requires inversion symmetry breaking. Here we report a unique stacking-induced SHG in trilayer graphene, whose individual monolayer sheet is centrosymmetric. Depending on layer stacking sequence, we observe a strong optical SHG in Bernal (ABA) stacked non-centrosymmetric trilayer, while it vanishes in rhombohedral (ABC) stacked one which preserves inversion symmetry. This highly contrasting SHG due to the distinct stacking symmetry enables us to map out the ABA and ABC crystal domains in otherwise homogeneous graphene trilayer. The extracted second order nonlinear susceptibility of the ABA trilayer is surprisingly large, comparable to the best known 2D semiconductors enhanced by excitonic resonance. Our results reveal a novel stacking order induced nonlinear optical effect, as well as unleash the opportunity for studying intriguing physical phenomena predicted for stacking-dependent ABA and ABC graphene trilayers.
  • Materials with massless Dirac fermions can possess exceptionally strong and widely tunable optical nonlinearities. Experiments on graphene monolayer have indeed found very large third-order nonlinear responses, but the reported variation of the nonlinear optical coefficient by orders of magnitude is not yet understood. A large part of the difficulty is the lack of information on how doping or chemical potential affects the different nonlinear optical processes. Here we report the first experimental study, in corroboration with theory, on third harmonic generation (THG) and four-wave mixing (FWM) in graphene that has its chemical potential tuned by ion-gel gating. THG was seen to have enhanced by ~30 times when pristine graphene was heavily doped, while difference-frequency FWM appeared just the opposite. The latter was found to have a strong divergence toward degenerate FWM in undoped graphene, leading to a giant third-order nonlinearity. These truly amazing characteristics of graphene come from the possibility to gate-control the chemical potential, which selectively switches on and off one- and multi-photon resonant transitions that coherently contribute to the optical nonlinearity, and therefore can be utilized to develop graphene-based nonlinear optoelectronic devices.
  • We present an interferometric technique for measuring ultra-small tilts. The information of a tilt in one of the mirrors of a modified Sagnac interferometer is carried by the phase difference between the counter propagating laser beams. Using a small misalignment of the interferometer, orthogonal to the plane of the tilt, a bimodal (or two-fringe) pattern is induced in the beam's transverse power distribution. By tracking the mean of such a distribution, using a split detector, a sensitive measurement of the phase is performed. With 1.2 mW of continuous-wave laser power, the technique has a shot noise limited sensitivity of 56 frad/$\sqrt{\mbox{Hz}}$, and a measured noise floor of 200 frad/$\sqrt{\mbox{Hz}}$ for tilt frequencies above 2 Hz. A tilt of 200 frad corresponds to a differential displacement of 4.0 fm in our setup. The novelty of the protocol relies on signal amplification due to the misalignment, and on good performance at low frequencies. A noise floor of about 70 prad/$\sqrt{\mbox{Hz}}$ is observed between 2 and 100 mHz.
  • The technique of almost-balanced weak values amplification (ABWV) was recently proposed [Phys. Rev. Lett. 116: 100803 (2016)]. We demonstrate this technique using a modified Sagnac interferometer, where the counter-propagating beams are spatially separated. The separation between the two beams provides additional amplification, with respect to using colinear beams in a Sagnac interferometer. As a demonstration of the technique, we perform measurements of the angular velocity in one of the mirrors of the interferometer. Within the same setup, the weak-value amplification technique is also performed for comparison. Much higher amplification factors can be obtained using the almost-balanced weak values technique, with the best one achieved in our experiments being as high as $1.2\times10^7$. In addition, the amplification factor monotonically increases with decreasing post-selection phase for the ABWV case in our experiments, which is not the case for weak-value amplification at small post-selection phases.
  • We measure a transverse momentum kick in a Sagnac interferometer using weak-value amplification with two postselections. The first postselection is controlled by a polarization dependent phase mismatch between both paths of a Sagnac interferometer and the second postselection is controlled by a polarizer at the exit port. By monitoring the darkport of the interferometer, we study the complementary amplification of the concatenated postselections, where the polarization extinction ratio is greater than the contrast of the spatial interference. In this case, we find an improvement in the amplification of the signal of interest by introducing a second postselection to the system.
  • We present a parameter estimation technique based on performing joint measurements of a weak interaction away from the weak-value-amplification approximation. Two detectors are used to collect full statistics of the correlations between two weakly entangled degrees of freedom. Without the need of postselection, the protocol resembles the anomalous amplification of an imaginary-weak-value-like response. The amplification is induced in the difference signal of both detectors allowing robustness to different sources of technical noise, and offering in addition the advantages of balanced signals for precision metrology. All of the Fisher information about the parameter of interest is collected, and a phase controls the amplification response. We experimentally demonstrate the proposed technique by measuring polarization rotations in a linearly polarized laser pulse. The effective sensitivity and precision of a split detector is increased when compared to a conventional continuous-wave balanced detection technique.
  • The spatial correlation with classical lights, which has some similar aspects as that with entangled lights, is an interesting and fundamentally important topic. But the features of high-order spatial correlation with classical lights are not well known, and the types of high-order correlations produced are of limit. Here, we propose a scheme to produce third-order spatial correlated states by modulating the phases of three laser beams. With the scheme we can produce Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger-type (GHZ-type) and W-type spatial correlations with different phase modulations. Our scheme can be easily generalized to produce $N$-order spatial correlation states and to probe the aspects of different multi-partite spatial correlations.
  • We study the relation between entanglement and quantum phase transition (QPT) from a new perspective. Motivated by one's intuition: QPT is characterized by the change of the ground-state structure, while entangled states belong to different classes have different structures, we conjecture that QPT occurs as the class of ground-state entanglement changes and prove it in XX model. Despite the classification of multipartite entanglement is yet unresolved, we proposed a new method to judge whether two many-body states belong to the same entanglement class.
  • According to the identity principle in quantum theory, states of a system consisted of identical particles should maintain unchanged under interchanging between two of the particles. The whole wavefunction should be symmetrized or antisymmetrized. This leads to statistical correlations between particles, which exhibit observable effects. We design an experiment to directly observe such effects for bosons. The experiment is performed with two photons. The effect of statistical correlations is clearly observed when the wavepackets of two photons are completely overlapped, and this effect varies with the degree of overlapping. The results of our experiment substantiate the statistical correlation in a simple way. Experiment reported here can also be regarded as another kind of two-photon Hong-Ou-Mandel interference, occurs in the polarization degree of freedom of photon.
  • We propose a deterministic remote state preparation scheme for photon polarization qubit states, where entanglement, local operations and classical communication are used. By consuming one maximally entangled state and two classical bits, an arbitrary (either pure or mixed) qubit state can be prepared deterministically at a remote location. We experimentally demonstrate the scheme by remotely preparing 12 pure states and 6 mixed states. The fidelities between the desired and achieved states are all higher than 0.99 and have an average of 0.9947.