• With more degrees of freedom to manipulate information, multi-field control of magnetic and electronic properties may trigger various potential applications in spintronics and microelectronics. However, facile and efficient modulation strategies which can simultaneously response to different stimuli are still highly desired. Here, the strongly correlated electron systems VO2 is introduced to realize efficient control of the magnetism in NiFe by phase-transition. The NiFe/VO2 bilayer heterostructure features appreciable modulations in the conductivity (10%), coercivity (60%), saturation magnetic strength (7%) and magnetic anisotropy (33.5%). Utilizing the multi-field modulation feature, programmable Boolean logic gates (AND, OR, NAND, NOR, XOR, NOT and NXOR) for high-speed and low-power data processing are demonstrated based on the heterostructure. Further analyses indicate that the interfacial strain coupling plays a crucial role in this modulation. As a demonstration of phase-transition spintronics, this work may pave the way for next-generation electronics in the post-Moore era.
  • Spin Hall effect (SHE) and voltage-controlled magnetic anisotropy (VCMA) are two promising methods for low-power electrical manipulation of magnetization. Recently, magnetic field-free switching of perpendicular magnetization through SHE has been reported with the aid of an exchange bias from an antiferromagnetic IrMn layer. In this letter, we experimentally demonstrate that the IrMn/CoFeB/MgO structure exhibits a VCMA effect of 39 fJ/Vm, which is comparable to that of the Ta/CoFeB/MgO structure. Magnetization dynamics under a combination of the SHE and VCMA are modeled and simulated. It is found that, by applying a voltage of 1.5 V, the critical SHE switching current can be decreased by 10 times owing to the VCMA effect, leading to low-power operations. Furthermore, a high-density spintronic memory structure can be built with multiple magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) located on a single IrMn strip. Through hybrid CMOS/MTJ simulations, we demonstrate that fast-speed write operations can be achieved with power consumption of only 8.5 fJ/bit. These findings reveal the possibility to realize high-density and low-power spintronic memory manipulated by voltage-gated SHE.
  • We have studied the magnetization reversal of CoFeB-MgO nanodots with perpendicular anisotropy for size ranging from w=400 nm to 1 {\mu}m. Contrary to previous experiments, the switching field distribution is shifted toward lower magnetic fields as the size of the elements is reduced with a mean switching field varying as 1/w. We show that this mechanism can be explained by the nucleation of a pinned magnetic domain wall (DW) at the edges of the nanodots where damages are introduced by the patterning process. As the surface tension (Laplace pressure) applied on the DW increases when reducing the size of the nanodots, we demonstrate that the depinning field to reverse the entire elements varies as 1/w. These results suggest that the presence of DWs has to be considered in the switching process of nanoscale elements and open a path toward scalable spintronic devices.
  • Magnetic skyrmions are promising candidates for future information technology. Here, we present a micromagnetic study of isolated skyrmions and skyrmion clusters in ferromagnetic nanodisks driven by the spin-polarized current with spatially varied polarization. The current-driven skyrmion clusters can be either dynamic steady or static, depending on the spatially varied polarization profile. For the dynamic steady state, the skyrmion cluster moves in a circle in the nanodisk, while for the static state, the skyrmion cluster is static. The frequency of the circular motion of skyrmion is also studied. Furthermore, the dependence of the skyrmion cluster dynamics on the magnetic anisotropy and Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction is investigated. Our results may provide a pathway to realize magnetic skyrmion cluster based devices.
  • The interfacial Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (DMI) in the ferromagnetic/heavy metal ultra-thin film structures , has attracted a lot of attention thanks to its capability to stabilize Neel-type domain walls (DWs) and magnetic skyrmions for the realization of non-volatile memory and logic devices. In this study, we demonstrate that magnetic properties in perpendicularly magnetized Ta/Pt/Co/MgO/Pt heterostructures, such as magnetization and DMI, can be significantly influenced through both the MgO and the Co ultrathin film thickness. By using a field-driven creep regime domain expansion technique, we find that non-monotonic tendencies of DMI field appear when changing the thickness of MgO and the MgO thickness corresponding to the largest DMI field varies as a function of the Co thicknesses. We interpret this efficient control of DMI as subtle changes of both Pt/Co and Co/MgO interfaces, which provide a method to investigate ultra-thin structures design to achieve skyrmion electronics.
  • The magnetic skyrmionium is a skyrmion-like structure but carries a zero net skyrmion number, which can be used as a building block for non-volatile information processing devices. Here, we study the dynamics of a magnetic skyrmionium driven by propagating spin waves. It is found that the skyrmionium can be effectively driven into motion by spin waves showing tiny skyrmion Hall effect, of which the mobility is much better than that of the skyrmion at the same condition. We also show that the skyrmionium mobility depends on the nanotrack width and damping coefficient, and can be controlled by an external out-of-plane magnetic field. Besides, we demonstrate the skyrmionium motion driven by spin waves is inertial. Our results indicate that the skyrmionium is a promising building block for building spin-wave spintronic devices.
  • Magnetic skyrmions are promising information carriers for building future high-density and high-speed spintronic devices. However, to achieve a current-driven high-speed skyrmion motion, the required driving current density is usually very large, which could be energy inefficient and even destroy the device due to Joule heating. Here, we propose a voltage-driven skyrmion motion approach in a skyrmion shift device made of magnetic nanowires. The high-speed skyrmion motion is realized by utilizing the voltage shift, and the average skyrmion velocity reaches up to 259 m/s under 0.45 V applied voltage. In comparison with the widely studied vertical current-driven model, the energy dissipation is three orders of magnitude lower in our voltage-driven model, for the same speed motion of skyrmions. Our approach uncovers valuable opportunities for building skyrmion racetrack memories and logic devices with both ultra-low power consumption and ultra-high processing speed, which are appealing features for future spintronic applications.
  • Emerging non-volatile memories (NVMs) have currently attracted great interest for their potential applications in advanced low-power information storage and processing technologies. Conventional NVMs, such as magnetic random access memory (MRAM) and resistive random access memory (RRAM) suffer from limitations of low tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR), low access speed or finite endurance. NVMs with synergetic advantages are still highly desired for future computer architectures. Here, we report a heterogeneous memristive device composed of a magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) nanopillar surrounded by resistive silicon switches, named resistively enhanced MTJ (Re-MTJ), that may be utilized for novel memristive memories, enabling new functionalities that are inaccessible for conventional NVMs. The Re-MTJ device features a high ON/OFF ratio of >1000% and multilevel resistance behaviour by combining magnetic switching together with resistive switching mechanisms. The magnetic switching originates from the MTJ, while the resistive switching is induced by a point-switching filament process that is related to the mobile oxygen ions. Microscopic evidence of silicon aggregated as nanocrystals along the edges of the nanopillars verifies the synergetic mechanism of the heterogeneous memristive device. This device may provide new possibilities for advanced memristive memory and computing architectures, e.g., in-memory computing and neuromorphics.
  • In this work, we demonstrate that skyrmions can be nucleated in the free layer of a magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) with Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interactions (DMI) by a spin-polarized current with the assistance of stray fields from the pinned layer. The size, stability and number of created skyrmions can be tuned by either the DMI strength or the stray field distribution. The interaction between the stray field and the DMI effective field is discussed. A device with multi-level tunneling magnetoresistance is proposed, which could pave the ways for skyrmion-MTJ-based multi-bit storage and artificial neural network computation. Our results may facilitate the efficient nucleation and electrical detection of skyrmions.
  • All spin logic device (ASLD) blazes an alternative path for realizing ultra-low power computing in the Post-Moore era. However, initial device structure relying on ferromagnetic input/output and spin transfer torque (STT) driven magnetization switching degrades its performance and even hinders its realization. In this paper, we propose an ASLD based on rare-earth (RE)-transition-metal (TM) ferromagnetic alloy that can achieve an ultra-high frequency up to terahertz. The spin orbit torque (SOT) induced fast precession near the spin angular momentum compensated point is investigated through the macrospin model. Combining the non-local spin current diffusing from the input to the output, a deterministic picosecond switching can be realized without any external magnetic field. Our results show that ASLD has the potential to exceed the performance of mainstream computing.
  • Two-dimensional (2D) materials and their heterostructures, with wafer-scale synthesis methods and fascinating properties, have attracted numerous interest and triggered revolutions of corresponding device applications. However, facile methods to realize accurate, intelligent and large-area characterizations of these 2D structures are still highly desired. Here, we report a successful application of machine-learning strategy in the optical identification of 2D structure. The machine-learning optical identification method (MOI method) endows optical microscopy with intelligent insight into the characteristic colour information in the optical photograph. Experimental results indicate that the MOI method enables accurate, intelligent and large-area characterizations of graphene, molybdenum disulphide (MoS2) and their heterostructures, including identifications of the thickness, the existence of impurities, and even the stacking order. Thanks to the convergence of artificial intelligence and nanoscience, this intelligent identification method can certainly promote the fundamental research and wafer-scale device application of 2D structures.
  • Spin-orbit torque magnetic random access memory (SOT-MRAM) has become the research focus due to the advantages of energy-efficient switch and prolonged endurance. The writing operation is performed by the SOT induced by the heavy metal (HM) layer, while the reading operation is based on the tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) effect. To explore the effect of HM layer on the TMR, we built top HM/CoFe/MgO/CoFe/bottom HM hetero-junctions and investigated the TMR character by first-principles calculations. It is found that the TMR would be enhanced by the HM layer symmetry, as the TMRs in W/CoFe/MgO/CoFe/W and Ta/CoFe/MgO/CoFe/Ta are higher than that in Ta/CoFe/MgO/CoFe/W. This phenomenon is attributed to the density of scattering states (DOSS) behavior and the resonant tunneling effect in parallel condition. We also studied the influence on TMR caused by thickness variation of bottom HM layer. In Ta/W/CoFe/MgO/CoFe/W/Ta SOT-MTJs, TMR ratios oscillate with variable bottom tungsten layer thickness, while all TMRs remain high. This result indicates that the HM layer symmetry dominates TMR, not the thickness. Our investigation presents a method to enhance TMR in spin-orbit torque magnetic tunnel junction (SOT-MTJ), which would benefit the high-reliability and low-energy-consumption SOT-MRAM.
  • We report first-principles investigations of magnetocrystalline anisotropy energy (MCAE) oscillations as a function of capping layer thickness in Heusler alloy Co\textsubscript{2}FeAl/Ta heterostructures. Substantial oscillation is observed in FeAl-interface structure. According to $k$-space and band-decomposed charge density analyses, this oscillation is mainly attributed to the Fermi-energy-vicinal quantum well states (QWS) which are confined between Co\textsubscript{2}FeAl/Ta interface and Ta/vacuum surface. The smaller oscillation magnitude in the Co-interface structure can be explained by the smooth potential transition at the interface. These findings clarify that MCAE in Co\textsubscript{2}FeAl/Ta is not a local property of the interface and that the quantum well effect plays a dominant role in MCAE oscillations of the heterostructures. This work presents the possibility of tuning MCAE by QWS in capping layers, and paves the way for artificially controlling magnetic anisotropy energy in magnetic tunnel junctions.
  • Circuit obfuscation is a frequently used approach to conceal logic functionalities in order to prevent reverse engineering attacks on fabricated chips. Efficient obfuscation implementations are expected with lower design complexity and overhead but higher attack difficulties. In this paper, an emerging obfuscation approach is proposed by leveraging spinorbit torque (SOT) devices based look-up-tables (LUTs) as reconfigurable logic to replace the carefully selected gates. It is essentially impossible to identify the obfuscated gate with SOTs inside according to the physical geometry characteristics because the configured functionalities are represented by magnetization states. Such an obfuscation approach makes the circuit security further improved with high exponential attack complexities. Experiments on MCNC and ISCAS 85/89 benchmark suits show that the proposed approach could reduce the area overheads due to obfuscation by 10% averagely.
  • Perpendicular magnetic tunnel junctions based on MgO/CoFeB structures are of particular interest for magnetic random-access memories because of their excellent thermal stability, scaling potential, and power dissipation. However, the major challenge of current-induced switching in the nanopillars with both a large tunnel magnetoresistance ratio and a low junction resistance is still to be met. Here, we report spin transfer torque switching in nano-scale perpendicular magnetic tunnel junctions with a magnetoresistance ratio up to 249% and a resistance area product as low as 7.0 {\Omega}.{\mu}m2, which consists of atom-thick W layers and double MgO/CoFeB interfaces. The efficient resonant tunnelling transmission induced by the atom-thick W layers could contribute to the larger magnetoresistance ratio than conventional structures with Ta layers, in addition to the robustness of W layers against high temperature diffusion during annealing. The switching critical current density could be lower than 3.0 MA.cm-2 for devices with a 45 nm radius.
  • Magnetic sensors based on the magnetoresistance effects have a promising application prospect due to their excellent sensitivity and advantages in terms of the integration. However, competition between higher sensitivity and larger measuring range remains a problem. Here, we propose a novel mechanism for the design of magnetoresistive sensors: probing the perpendicular field by detecting the expansion of the elastic magnetic Domain Wall (DW) in the free layer of a spin valve or a magnetic tunnel junction. Performances of devices based on this mechanism, such as the sensitivity and the measuring range can be tuned by manipulating the geometry of the device, without changing the intrinsic properties of the material, thus promising a higher integration level and a better performance. The mechanism is theoretically explained based on the experimental results. Two examples are proposed and their functionality and performances are verified via micromagnetic simulation.
  • Magnetic skyrmion is a topologically protected domain-wall structure at nanoscale, which could serve as a basic building block for advanced spintronic devices. Here, we propose a microwave field-driven skyrmionic device with the transistor-like function, where the motion of a skyrmion in a voltage-gated ferromagnetic nanotrack is studied by micromagnetic simulations. It is demonstrated that the microwave field can drive the motion of a skyrmion by exciting propagating spin waves, and the skyrmion motion can be governed by a gate voltage. We also investigate the microwave current-assisted creation of a skyrmion to facilitate the operation of the transistor-like skyrmionic device on the source terminal. It is found that the microwave current with an appropriate frequency can reduce the threshold current density required for the creation of a skyrmion from the ferromagnetic background. The proposed transistor-like skyrmionic device operated with the microwave field and current could be useful for building future skyrmion-based circuits.
  • The surface energy of a magnetic Domain Wall (DW) strongly affects its static and dynamic behaviours. However, this effect was seldom directly observed and many related phenomena have not been well understood. Moreover, a reliable method to quantify the DW surface energy is still missing. Here, we report a series of experiments in which the DW surface energy becomes a dominant parameter. We observed that a semicircular magnetic domain bubble could spontaneously collapse under the Laplace pressure induced by DW surface energy. We further demonstrated that the surface energy could lead to a geometrically induced pinning when the DW propagates in a Hall cross or from a nanowire into a nucleation pad. Based on these observations, we developed two methods to quantify the DW surface energy, which could be very helpful to estimate intrinsic parameters such as Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya Interactions (DMI) or exchange stiffness in magnetic ultra-thin films.
  • Pt/Co/heavy metal (HM) tri-layered structures with interfacial perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) are currently under intensive research for several emerging spintronic effects, such as spinorbit torque, domain wall motion, and room temperature skyrmions. HM materials are used as capping layers to generate the structural asymmetry and enhance the interfacial effects. For instance, the Pt/Co/Ta structure attracts a lot of attention as it may exhibit large Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction. However, the dependence of magnetic properties on different capping materials has not been systematically investigated. In this paper, we experimentally show the interfacial PMA and damping constant for Pt/Co/HM tri-layered structures through time-resolved magneto-optical Kerr effect measurements as well as magnetometry measurements, where the capping HM materials are W, Ta, and Pd. We found that the Co/HM interface plays an important role on the magnetic properties. In particular, the magnetic multilayers with a W capping layer features the lowest effective damping value, which may be attributed to the different spin-orbit coupling and interfacial hybridization between Co and HM materials. Our findings allow a deep understanding of the Pt/Co/HM tri-layered structures. Such structures could lead to a better era of data storage and processing devices.
  • Spin-transfer-torque magnetic random access memory (STT-MRAM) attracts extensive attentions due to its non-volatility, high density and low power consumption. The core device in STT-MRAM is CoFeB/MgO-based magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ), which possesses a high tunnel magnetoresistance ratio as well as a large value of perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA). It has been experimentally proven that a capping layer coating on CoFeB layer is essential to obtain a strong PMA. However, the physical mechanism of such effect remains unclear. In this paper, we investigate the origin of the PMA in MgO/CoFe/metallic capping layer structures by using a first-principles computation scheme. The trend of PMA variation with different capping materials agrees well with experimental results. We find that interfacial PMA in the three-layer structures comes from both the MgO/CoFe and CoFe/capping layer interfaces, which can be analyzed separately. Furthermore, the PMAs in the CoFe/capping layer interfaces are analyzed through resolving the magnetic anisotropy energy by layer and orbital. The variation of PMA with different capping materials is attributed to the different hybridizations of both d and p orbitals via spin-orbital coupling. This work can significantly benefit the research and development of nanoscale STT-MRAM.
  • It has been reported in experiments that capping layers which enhance the perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) of magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) induce great impact on the tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR). To explore the essential influence caused by capping layers, we carry out ab initio calculations on TMR in the X(001)|CoFe(001)|MgO(001)|CoFe(001)|X(001) MTJ, where X represents the capping layer material which can be tungsten, tantalum or hafnium. We report TMR in different MTJs and demonstrate that tungsten is an ideal candidate for a giant TMR ratio. The transmission spectrum in Brillouin zone is presented. It can be seen that in the parallel condition of MTJ, sharp transmission peaks appear in the minority-spin channel. This phenomenon is attributed to the resonant tunnel transmission effect and we explained it by the layer-resolved density of states (DOS). In order to explore transport properties in MTJs, the density of scattering states (DOSS) was studied from the point of band symmetry. It has been found that CoFe|tungsten interface blocks scattering states transmission in the anti-parallel condition. This work reports TMR and transport properties in MTJs with different capping layers, and proves that tungsten is a proper capping layer material, which would benefit the design and optimization of MTJs.
  • Magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) based on CoFeB/MgO/CoFeB structures is of great interest due to its application in the spin-transfer-torque magnetic random access memory (STT-MRAM). Large interfacial perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) is required to achieve high thermal stability. Here we use first-principles calculations to investigate the magnetic anisotropy energy (MAE) of MgO/CoFe/capping layer structures, where the capping materials include 5d metals Hf, Ta, Re, Os, Ir, Pt, Au and 6p metals Tl, Pb, Bi. We demonstrate that it is feasible to enhance PMA by using proper capping materials. Relatively large PMA is found in the structures with capping materials of Hf, Ta, Os, Ir and Pb. More importantly, the MgO/CoFe/Bi structure gives rise to giant PMA (6.09 mJ/m2), which is about three times larger than that of the MgO/CoFe/Ta structure. The origin of the MAE is elucidated by examining the contributions to MAE from each atomic layer and orbital. These findings provide a comprehensive understanding of the PMA and point towards the possibility to achieve advanced-node STT-MRAM with high thermal stability.
  • The high current density required by Magnetic Tunneling Junction (MTJ) switching driven by Spin Transfer Torque (STT) effect leads to large power consumption and severe reliability issues therefore hinder the timetable for STT Magnetic Random Access Memory (STT-MRAM) to mass market. By utilizing Voltage Controlled Magnetic Anisotropy (VCMA) effect, the MTJ can be switched by voltage effect and is postulated to achieve ultra-low power (fJ). However, the VCMA coefficient measured in experiments is far too small for MTJ dimension below 100 nm. Here in this work, a novel approach for the amplification of VCMA effect which borrow ideas from negative capacitance is proposed. The feasibility of the proposal is proved by physical simulation and in-depth analysis.
  • A magnetic skyrmionium is a nontopological soliton, which has a doughnut-like out-of-plane spin texture in thin films, and can be phenomenologically viewed as a coalition of two topological magnetic skyrmions with opposite topological numbers. Due to its zero topological number ($Q=0$) and doughnut-like structure, the skyrmionium has its distinctive characteristics as compared to the skyrmion with $Q=\pm 1$. Here we systematically study the generation, manipulation and motion of a skyrmionium in ultrathin magnetic nanostructures by applying a magnetic field or a spin-polarized current. It is found that the skyrmionium moves faster than the skyrmion when they are driven by the out-of-plane current, and their velocity difference is proportional to the driving force. However, the skyrmionium and skyrmion exhibit an identical current-velocity relation when they are driven by the in-plane current. It is also found that a moving skyrmionium is less deformed in the current-in-plane geometry compared with the skyrmionum in the current-perpendicular-to-plane geometry. Furthermore we demonstrate the transformation of a skyrmionium with $Q=0$ into two skyrmions with $Q=+1$ in a nanotrack driven by a spin-polarized current, which can be seen as the unzipping process of a skyrmionium. We illustrate the energy and spin structure variations during the skyrmionium unzipping process, where linear relations between the spin structure and energies are found. These results could have technological implications in the emerging field of skyrmionics.
  • Magnetic skyrmions are promising candidates for next-generation information carriers, owing to their small size, topological stability, and ultralow depinning current density. A wide variety of skyrmionic device concepts and prototypes have been proposed, highlighting their potential applications. Here, we report on a bioinspired skyrmionic device with synaptic plasticity. The synaptic weight of the proposed device can be strengthened/weakened by positive/negative stimuli, mimicking the potentiation/depression process of a biological synapse. Both short-term plasticity(STP) and long-term potentiation(LTP) functionalities have been demonstrated for a spiking time-dependent plasticity(STDP) scheme. This proposal suggests new possibilities for synaptic devices for use in spiking neuromorphic computing applications.