• The Carnegie Hubble Program (CHP) is designed to improve the extragalactic distance scale using data from the post-cryogenic era of Spitzer. The ultimate goal is a determination of the Hubble constant to an accuracy of 2%. This paper is the first in a series on the Cepheid population of the Large Magellanic Cloud, and focusses on the period-luminosity relations (Leavitt laws) that will be used, in conjunction with observations of Milky Way Cepheids, to set the slope and zero--point of the Cepheid distance scale in the mid-infrared. To this end, we have obtained uniformly-sampled light curves for 85 LMC Cepheids, having periods between 6 and 140 days. Period-luminosity and period-color relations are presented in the 3.6 \mu m and 4.5\mu m bands. We demonstrate that the 3.6 \mu m band is a superb distance indicator. The cyclical variation of the [3.6]-[4.5] color has been measured for the first time. We attribute the amplitude and phase of the color curves to the dissociation and recombination of CO molecules in the Cepheid's atmosphere. The CO affects only the 4.5 \mu m flux making it a potential metallicity indicator.
  • The giant elliptical galaxy NGC 1316 (Fornax A) is a well-studied member of the Fornax Cluster and a prolific producer of Type Ia supernovae, having hosted four observed events since 1980. Here we present detailed optical and near-infrared light curves of the spectroscopically normal SN 2006dd. These data are used, along with previously published photometry of the normal SN 1980N and SN 1981D, and the fast-declining, low-luminosity SN 2006mr, to compute independent estimates of the host reddening for each supernova, and the distance to NGC 1316. From the three normal supernovae, we find a distance of 17.8 +/- 0.3 (random) +/- 0.3 (systematic) Mpc for Ho = 72. Distance moduli derived from the "EBV" and Tripp methods give values that are mutually consistent to 4 -- 8%. Moreover, the weighted means of the distance moduli for these three SNe for three methods agree to within 3%. This consistency is encouraging and supports the premise that Type Ia supernovae are reliable distance indicators at the 5% precision level or better. On the other hand, the two methods used to estimate the distance of the fast-declining SN 2006mr both yield a distance to NGC 1316 which is 25-30% larger. This disparity casts doubt on the suitability of fast-declining events for estimating extragalactic distances. Modest-to-negligible host galaxy reddening values are derived for all four supernovae. Nevertheless, two of them (SN 2006dd and SN 2006mr) show strong NaID interstellar lines in the host galaxy system. The strength of this absorption is completely inconsistent with the small reddening values derived from the supernova light curves if the gas in NGC 1316 is typical of that found in the interstellar medium of the Milky Way. In addition, the equivalent width of the NaID lines in SN 2006dd appear to have weakened significantly some 100-150 days after explosion.
  • We observed two fields near M32 with the Advanced Camera for Surveys/High Resolution Channel (ACS/HRC) on board the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). The main field, F1, is 1.8 arcmin from the center of M32; the second field, F2, constrains the M31 background, and is 5.4 arcmin distant. Each field was observed for 16-orbits in each of the F435W (narrow B) and F555W (narrow V) filters. The duration of the observations allowed RR Lyrae stars and other short-period variables to be detected. A population of RR Lyrae stars determined to belong to M32 would prove the existence of an ancient population in that galaxy, a subject of some debate. We detected 17 RR Lyrae variables in F1 and 14 in F2. A 1-sigma upper limit of 6 RR Lyrae variables belonging to M32 is inferred from these two fields alone. Use of our two ACS/WFC parallel fields provides better constraints on the M31 background, however, and implies that $7_{-3}^{+4}$ (68 % confidence interval) RR Lyrae variables in F1 belong to M32. We have therefore found evidence for an ancient population in M32. It seems to be nearly indistinguishable from the ancient population of M31. The RR Lyrae stars in the F1 and F2 fields have indistinguishable mean V-band magnitudes, mean periods, distributions in the Bailey diagram and ratios of RRc to RR(tot) types. However, the color distributions in the two fields are different, with a population of red RRab variables in F1 not seen in F2. We suggest that these might be identified with the detected M32 RR Lyrae population, but the small number of stars rules out a definitive claim.
  • We present Hubble Space Telescope observations taken with the Advanced Camera for Surveys Wide Field Channel of two fields near M32 - between four and six kpc from the center of M31. The data cover a time baseline sufficient for the identification and characterization of 681 RR Lyrae variables of which 555 are ab-type and 126 are c-type. The mean magnitude of these stars is <V>=25.29 +/- 0.05 where the uncertainty combines both the random and systematic errors. The location of the stars in the Bailey Diagram and the ratio of c-type RR Lyraes to all types are both closer to RR Lyraes in Oosterhoff type I globular clusters in the Milky Way as compared with Oosterhoff II clusters. The mean periods of the ab-type and c-type RR Lyraes are <P(ab)>=0.557 +/- 0.003 and <P(c)>=0.327 +/- 0.003, respectively, where the uncertainties in each case represent the standard error of the mean. When the periods and amplitudes of the ab-type RR Lyraes in our sample are interpreted in terms of metallicity, we find the metallicity distribution function to be indistinguishable from a Gaussian with a peak at <[Fe/H]>=-1.50 +/- 0.02, where the quoted uncertainty is the standard error of the mean. Using a relation between RR Lyrae luminosity and metallicity along with a reddening of E(B-V) = 0.08 +/- 0.03, we find a distance modulus of (m-M)o=24.46 +/- 0.11 for M31. We examine the radial metallicity gradient in the environs of M31 using published values for the bulge and halo of M31 as well as the abundances of its dwarf spheroidal companions and globular clusters. In this context, we conclude that the RR Lyraes in our two fields are more likely to be halo objects rather than associated with the bulge or disk of M31, in spite of the fact that they are located at 4-6 kpc in projected distance from the center.
  • Abridged: The golden age of astrophysics is upon us with both grand discoveries (extra-solar planets, dark matter, dark energy) and precision cosmology. Fundamental understanding of the working of stars and galaxies is within reach, thanks to newly available precision measurements. We highlight the importance of distances and model independent distances and masses. Distances are fundamental in astrophysics and their knowledge can change our perception of phenomena dramatically: e.g., in antiquity, the Heliocentric model was rejected because the predicted stellar parallaxes were not observed. Distance measurements are directly related to the history & fate of the uni- verse as they provide 2 of 3 methods available to date the universe. The 1st method is based on the ages of stars, which can be ascertained if their lumi- nosities (distances) are accurately known. The 2nd method relies on cosmolo- gical methods. To 1st order, the age of the universe is the inverse H_0. As stressed by the previous decadal report, "the fundamental goal of ... astrophysics is to understand how the universe ... galaxies [and] stars ... formed, how they evolved, and what their destiny will be." These questions can be answered partly by micro-arcsecond astrometry: 1) Galactic archeology: a detailed reconstruction of the formation history of the Milky Way and other Local Group galaxies, 2) the very oldest stars in the Milky Way and the age of the Universe, and 3) H_0 and concordance cosmology. These goals are achievable by combining muas-arcsecond astrometry from the proposed SIM-Lite mission supplemented with ground-based spectroscopy. The results of our proposed project will force the biggest reassessment of stellar astrophysics in 50 years, which will affect most branches of astrophysics.
  • In this paper we analyze the stellar populations present in M31 using nine sets of adjacent HST-NICMOS Camera 1 and 2 fields with galactocentric distances ranging from 2' to 20'. These infrared observations provide some of the highest spatial resolution measurements of M31 to date; our data place tight constraints on the maximum luminosities of stars in the bulge of M31. The tip of the red giant branch is clearly visible at Mbol ~ -3.8, and the tip of the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) extends to Mbol ~ -5. This AGB peak luminosity is significantly fainter than previously claimed; through direct comparisons and simulations we show that previous measurements were affected by image blending. We do observe field-to-field variations in the luminosity functions, but simulations show that these differences can be produced by blending in the higher surface brightness fields. We conclude that the red giant branch of the bulge of M31 is not measurably different from that of the Milky Way's bulge. We also find an unusually high number of bright blueish stars (7.3/arcmin^2) which appear to be Galactic foreground stars.
  • The final efforts of the HST Key Project on the Extragalactic Distance Scale are presented. Four distance indicators, the Surface Brightness Fluctuation method, the Fundamental Plane for early-type galaxies, the Tully-Fisher relation and the Type Ia Supernovae, are calibrated using Cepheid distances to galaxies within 25 Mpc. The calibration is then applied to distant samples reaching cz~10000 km/s and (in the case of SNIa) beyond. By combining the constraints imposed on the Hubble constant by the four distance indicators, we obtain H0 = 71+/-6 km/s/Mpc.