• We present detailed ultraviolet, optical and near-infrared light curves of the Type Ia supernova (SN) 2012fr, which exploded in the Fornax cluster member NGC 1365. These precise high-cadence light curves provide a dense coverage of the flux evolution from $-$12 to $+$140 days with respect to the epoch of $B$-band maximum (\tmax). Supplementary imaging at the earliest epochs reveals an initial slow, nearly linear rise in luminosity with a duration of $\sim$2.5 days, followed by a faster rising phase that is well reproduced by an explosion model with a moderate amount of $^{56}$Ni mixing in the ejecta. From an analysis of the light curves, we conclude: $(i)$ explosion occurred $< 22$ hours before the first detection of the supernova, $(ii)$ the rise time to peak bolometric ($\lambda > 1800 $\AA) luminosity was $16.5 \pm 0.6$ days, $(iii)$ the supernova suffered little or no host-galaxy dust reddening, $(iv)$ the peak luminosity in both the optical and near-infrared was consistent with the bright end of normal Type Ia diversity, and $(v)$ $0.60 \pm 0.15 M_{\odot}$ of $^{56}$Ni was synthesized in the explosion. Despite its normal luminosity, SN 2012fr displayed unusually prevalent high-velocity \ion{Ca}{2} and \ion{Si}{2} absorption features, and a nearly constant photospheric velocity of the \ion{Si}{2} $\lambda$6355 line at $\sim$12,000 \kms\ beginning $\sim$5 days before \tmax. Other peculiarities in the early phase photometry and the spectral evolution are highlighted. SN 2012fr also adds to a growing number of Type Ia supernovae hosted by galaxies with direct Cepheid distance measurements.
  • We present a new empirical \(JHK\) absolute calibration of the tip of the red giant branch (TRGB) in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). We use published data from the extensive \emph{Near-Infrared Synoptic Survey} containing 3.5 million stars, of which 65,000 are red giants that fall within one magnitude of the TRGB. Adopting the TRGB slopes from a companion study of the isolated dwarf galaxy IC\,1613 as well as an LMC distance modulus of \(\mu_0 = \)~18.49~mag from (geometric) detached eclipsing binaries, we derive absolute \(JHK\) zero-points for the near-infrared TRGB. For comparison with measurements in the bar alone, we apply the calibrated \(JHK\) TRGB to a 500 deg\textsuperscript{2} area of the 2MASS survey. The TRGB reveals the 3-dimensional structure of the LMC with a tilt in the direction perpendicular to the major axis of the bar, in agreement with previous studies.
  • Based on observations from the \emph{FourStar} near-infrared camera on the 6.5m Baade-Magellan telescope at Las Campanas, Chile, we present calibrations of the $JHK$ luminosities of stars defining the tip of the red giant branch (TRGB) in the halo of the Local Group dwarf galaxy IC 1613. We employ metallicity-independent (rectified) T-band magnitudes---constructed using $J,H$ and $K$-band magnitudes and both $(J-H)~ \& ~(J-K)$ colors in order to flatten the upward-sloping red giant branch tips as otherwise seen in their apparent color-magnitude diagrams. We describe and quantify the advantages of working at these particular near-infrared wavelengths, which are applicable to both \emph{HST} and \emph{JWST}. We also note that these same wavelengths can be accessed from the ground for an eventual tie-in to \emph{Gaia} for absolute astrometry and parallaxes to calibrate the intrinsic luminosity of the TRGB. Adopting the color terms derived from the IC 1613 data, as well as the zero-points from a companion study of the Large Magellanic Cloud whose distance is anchored to the geometric distances of detached eclipsing binaries, we find a true distance modulus of 24.32 $\pm$ 0.02~ (statistical) $\pm$ 0.06~mag (systematic) for IC 1613, which compares favorably with the recently published multi-wavelength, multi-method consensus modulus of 24.30 $\pm$ 0.05~mag by Hatt et al. (2017).
  • IC 1613 is an isolated dwarf galaxy within the Local Group. Low foreground and internal extinction, low metallicity, and low crowding make it an invaluable testbed for the calibration of the local distance ladder. We present new, high-fidelity distance estimates to IC 1613 via its Tip of the Red Giant Branch (TRGB) and its RR Lyrae (RRL) variables as part of the Carnegie-Chicago Hubble Program, which seeks an alternate local route to \ho using Population II stars. We have measured a TRGB magnitude I=20.35+/-0.01 (statistical)+/-0.01 (systematic) using wide-field observations obtained from the IMACS camera on the Magellan-Baade telescope. We have further constructed optical and near-infrared RRL light curves using archival BI- and new H- band observations from the ACS/WFC and WFC3/IR instruments aboard the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). In advance of future Gaia data releases, we set provisional values for the TRGB luminosity via the Large Magellanic Cloud and Galactic RRL zero-points via HST parallaxes. We find corresponding true distance moduli \mu(TRGB)=24.30+/-0.03 (statistical)+/-0.05 (systematic) and \mu(RRL)=24.28+/-0.04 (statistical+systematic). We compare our results to a body of recent publications on IC 1613 and find no statistically significant difference between the distances derived from stars of Population I and II.
  • We present final natural system optical (ugriBV) and near-infrared (YJH) photometry of 134 supernovae (SNe) with probable white dwarf progenitors that were observed in 2004-2009 as part of the first stage of the Carnegie Supernova Project (CSP-I). The sample consists of 123 Type Ia SNe, 5 Type Iax SNe, 2 super-Chandrasekhar SN candidates, 2 Type Ia SNe interacting with circumstellar matter, and 2 SN 2006bt-like events. The redshifts of the objects range from z = 0.0037 to 0.0835; the median redshift is 0.0241. For 120 (90%) of these SNe, near-infrared photometry was obtained. Average optical extinction coefficients and color terms are derived and demonstrated to be stable during the five CSP-I observing campaigns. Measurements of the CSP-I near-infrared bandpasses are also described, and near-infrared color terms are estimated through synthetic photometry of stellar atmosphere models. Optical and near-infrared magnitudes of local sequences of tertiary standard stars for each supernova are given, and a new calibration of Y-band magnitudes of the Persson et al. (1998) standards in the CSP-I natural system is presented.
  • We present 888 visual-wavelength spectra of 122 nearby type II supernovae (SNe II) obtained between 1986 and 2009, and ranging between 3 and 363 days post explosion. In this first paper, we outline our observations and data reduction techniques, together with a characterization based on the spectral diversity of SNe~II. A statistical analysis of the spectral matching technique is discussed as an alternative to non-detection constraints for estimating SN explosion epochs. The time evolution of spectral lines is presented and analysed in terms of how this differs for SNe of different photometric, spectral, and environmental properties: velocities, pseudo-equivalent widths, decline rates, magnitudes, time durations, and environment metallicity. Our sample displays a large range in ejecta expansion velocities, from $\sim9600$ to $\sim1500$ km s$^{-1}$ at 50 days post explosion with a median H$_{\alpha}$ value of 7300 km s$^{-1}$. This is most likely explained through differing explosion energies. Significant diversity is also observed in the absolute strength of spectral lines, characterised through their pseudo-equivalent widths. This implies significant diversity in both temperature evolution (linked to progenitor radius) and progenitor metallicity between different SNe~II. Around 60\% of our sample show an extra absorption component on the blue side of the H$_{\alpha}$ P-Cygni profile ("Cachito" feature) between 7 and 120 days since explosion. Studying the nature of Cachito, we conclude that these features at early times (before $\sim35$ days) are associated with \ion{Si}{2} $\lambda6355$, while past the middle of the plateau phase they are related to high velocity (HV) features of hydrogen lines.
  • We are at an interesting juncture in cosmology. With new methods and technology, the accuracy in measurement of the Hubble constant has vastly improved, but a recent tension has arisen that is either signaling new physics or as-yet unrecognized uncertainties.
  • We present new theoretical period-luminosity-metallicity (PLZ) relations for RR Lyrae stars (RRL) at Spitzer and WISE wavelengths. The PLZ relations were derived using nonlinear, time-dependent convective hydrodynamical models for a broad range in metal abundances (Z=0.0001 to 0.0198). In deriving the light curves, we tested two sets of atmospheric models (Brott & Hauschildt 2005, Castelli & Kurucz 2003) and found no significant difference between the resulting mean magnitudes. We also compare our theoretical relations to empirical relations derived from RRL in both the field and in the globular cluster M4. Our theoretical PLZ relations were combined with multi-wavelength observations to simultaneously fit the distance modulus, mu_0, and extinction, Av, of both the individual Galactic RRL and of the cluster M4. The results for the Galactic RRL are consistent with trigonometric parallax measurements from Gaia's first data release. For M4, we find a distance modulus of $\mu_0=11.257 \pm 0.035$ mag with $A_V = 1.45 \pm 0.12$ mag, which is consistent with measurements from other distance indicators. This analysis has shown that when considering a sample covering a range of iron abundances, the metallicity spread introduces a dispersion in the PL relation on the order of 0.13 mag. However, if this metallicity component is accounted for in a PLZ relation, the dispersion is reduced to ~0.02 mag at MIR wavelengths.
  • The Carnegie-Chicago Hubble Program seeks to anchor the distance scale of Type Ia supernovae via the Tip of the Red Giant Branch (TRGB). Based on deep $Hubble$ $Space$ $Telescope$ ACS/WFC imaging, we present an analysis of the TRGB for the metal-poor halo of NGC 1365, a giant spiral galaxy in the Fornax Cluster that is host to the supernova SN2012fr. We have measured its extinction-corrected TRGB magnitude to be F814W $= 27.34 \pm 0.03_{stat} \pm0.01_{sys}$ mag. In advance of future direct calibration by $Gaia$, we set a provisional TRGB luminosity via the Large Magellanic Cloud and find a true distance modulus $\mu_0 = 31.29 \pm 0.04_{stat}\pm0.05_{sys}$ mag or $D = 18.1 \pm 0.3_{stat} \pm0.4_{sys}$ Mpc. This high-fidelity measurement shows excellent agreement with recent Cepheid-based distances to NGC 1365 and suggests no significant difference in the distances derived from stars of Population I and II. We revisit the error budget for the $CCHP$ path to the Hubble Constant based on this analysis of one of our most distant hosts, finding a 2.5% measurement is feasible with our current sample.
  • We present a multi-wavelength compilation of new and previously-published photometry for 55 Galactic field RR Lyrae variables. Individual studies, spanning a time baseline of up to 30 years, are self-consistently phased to produce light curves in 10 photometric bands covering the wavelength range from 0.4 to 4.5 microns. Data smoothing via the GLOESS technique is described and applied to generate high-fidelity light curves, from which mean magnitudes, amplitudes, rise-times, and times of minimum and maximum light are derived. 60,000 observations were acquired using the new robotic Three-hundred MilliMeter Telescope (TMMT), which was first deployed at the Carnegie Observatories in Pasadena, CA, and is now permanently installed and operating at Las Campanas Observatory in Chile. We provide a full description of the TMMT hardware, software, and data reduction pipeline. Archival photometry contributed approximately 31,000 observations. Photometric data are given in the standard Johnson UBV, Kron-Cousins RI, 2MASS JHK, and Spitzer [3.6] & [4.5] bandpasses.
  • We present an overview of the Carnegie-Chicago Hubble Program, an ongoing program to obtain a 3 per cent measurement of the Hubble constant using alternative methods to the traditional Cepheid distance scale. We aim to establish a completely independent route to the Hubble constant using RR Lyrae variables, the tip of the red giant branch (TRGB), and Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia). This alternative distance ladder can be applied to galaxies of any Hubble Type, of any inclination, and, utilizing old stars in low density environments, is robust to the degenerate effects of metallicity and interstellar extinction. Given the relatively small number of SNe Ia host galaxies with independently measured distances, these properties provide a great systematic advantage in the measurement of the Hubble constant via the distance ladder. Initially, the accuracy of our value of the Hubble constant will be set by the five Galactic RR Lyrae calibrators with Hubble Space Telescope Fine-Guidance Sensor parallaxes. With Gaia, both the RR Lyrae zero point and TRGB method will be independently calibrated, the former with at least an order of magnitude more calibrators and the latter directly through parallax measurement of tip red giants. As the first end-to-end "distance ladder" completely independent of both Cepheid variables and the Large Magellanic Cloud, this path to the Hubble constant will allow for the high precision comparison at each rung of the traditional distance ladder that is necessary to understand tensions between this and other routes to the Hubble constant.
  • We compare mid-infrared 3.6 and 4.5 $\mu$m Warm Spitzer observations for Cepheids in the Milky Way and the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds. Using models, we explore in detail the effect of the CO rotation-vibration band-head at 4.6 $\mu$m on the mid-infrared photometry. We confirm the temperature sensitivity of the CO band-head at 4.6 $\mu$m and find no evidence for an effect at 3.6 $\mu$m. We compare the ([3.6]-[4.5]) period-colour relations in the MW, LMC, and SMC. The slopes of the period-colour relations for the three galaxies are in good agreement, but there is a trend in zero-point with metallicity, with the lowest metallicity Cepheids having redder mid-IR colours. Finally, we present a colour-[Fe/H] relation based on published spectroscopic metallicities. This empirical relation, calibrated to the metallicity system of Genovali et al. (2014), demonstrates that the ([3.6]-[4.5]) colour provides a reliable metallicity indicator for Cepheids, with a precision comparable to current spectroscopic determinations.
  • Using Spitzer observations of classical Cepheids we have measured the true average distance modulus of the SMC to be $18.96 \pm 0.01_{stat} \pm 0.03_{sys}$ mag (corresponding to $62 \pm 0.3$ kpc), which is $0.48 \pm 0.01$ mag more distant than the LMC. This is in agreement with previous results from Cepheid observations, as well as with measurements from other indicators such as RR Lyrae stars and the tip of the red giant branch. Utilizing the properties of the mid--infrared Leavitt Law we measured precise distances to individual Cepheids in the SMC, and have confirmed that the galaxy is tilted and elongated such that its eastern side is up to 20 kpc closer than its western side. This is in agreement with the results from red clump stars and dynamical simulations of the Magellanic Clouds and Stream.
  • We present a revised distance to the nearby galaxy NGC6822 using a new multi-band fit to both previously published and new optical, near- and mid-infrared data for Cepheid variables. The new data presented in this study include multi-epoch observations obtained in 3.6\um and 4.5\um with the \emph{Spitzer Space Telescope} taken for the Carnegie Hubble Program. We also present new observations in J, H and \kswith FourStar on the Magellan Baade telescope at Las Campanas Observatory. We determine mean magnitudes and present new period-luminosity relations in V, I, J, H, \ks, IRAC 3.6\um and 4.5\um. In addition to using the multi-band distance moduli to calculate extinction and a true distance, we present a new method for determining an extinction-corrected distance modulus from multi-band data with varying sample sizes. We combine the distance moduli and extinction for individual stars to determine $E(B-V)=0.35\pm0.04$ and a true distance modulus $\mu_{o}=23.38\pm0.02_{stat}\pm0.04_{sys}$.
  • We present an updated analysis of the intrinsic colors of SNe Ia using the latest data release of the Carnegie Supernova Project. We introduce a new light-curve parameter very similar to stretch that is better suited for fast-declining events, and find that these peculiar types can be seen as extensions to the population of "normal" SNe Ia. With a larger number of objects, an updated fit to the Lira relation is presented along with evidence for a dependence on the late-time slope of the B-V color-curves with stretch and color. Using the full wavelength range from u to H band, we place constraints on the reddening law for the sample as a whole and also for individual events/hosts based solely on the observed colors. The photometric data continue to favor low values of Rv, though with large variations from event to event, indicating an intrinsic distribution. We confirm the findings of other groups that there appears to be a correlation between the derived reddening law, Rv, and the color excess, E(B-V), such that larger E(B-V) tends to favor lower Rv. The intrinsic u-band colors show a relatively large scatter that cannot be explained by variations in Rv or by the Goobar (2008) power-law for circumstellar dust, but rather is correlated with spectroscopic features of the supernova and is therefore likely due to metallicity effects.
  • We present an analysis of the diversity of V-band light-curves of hydrogen-rich type II supernovae. Analyzing a sample of 116 supernovae, several magnitude measurements are defined, together with decline rates at different epochs, and time durations of different phases. It is found that magnitudes measured at maximum light correlate more strongly with decline rates than those measured at other epochs: brighter supernovae at maximum generally have faster declining light-curves at all epochs. We find a relation between the decline rate during the 'plateau' phase and peak magnitudes, which has a dispersion of 0.56 magnitudes, offering the prospect of using type II supernovae as purely photometric distance indicators. Our analysis suggests that the type II population spans a continuum from low-luminosity events which have flat light-curves during the 'plateau' stage, through to the brightest events which decline much faster. A large range in optically thick phase durations is observed, implying a range in progenitor envelope masses at the epoch of explosion. During the radioactive tails, we find many supernovae with faster declining light-curves than expected from full trapping of radioactive emission, implying low mass ejecta. It is suggested that the main driver of light-curve diversity is the extent of hydrogen envelopes retained before explosion. Finally, a new classification scheme is introduced where hydrogen-rich events are typed as simply 'SNII' with an s2 value giving the decline rate during the 'plateau' phase, indicating its morphological type.
  • High-dispersion observations of the Na I D 5890, 5896 and K I 7665, 7699 interstellar lines, and the diffuse interstellar band at 5780 Angstroms in the spectra of 32 Type Ia supernovae are used as an independent means of probing dust extinction. We show that the dust extinction of the objects where the diffuse interstellar band at 5780 Angstroms is detected is consistent with the visual extinction derived from the supernova colors. This strongly suggests that the dust producing the extinction is predominantly located in the interstellar medium of the host galaxies and not in circumstellar material associated with the progenitor system. One quarter of the supernovae display anomalously large Na I column densities in comparison to the amount of dust extinction derived from their colors. Remarkably, all of the cases of unusually strong Na I D absorption correspond to "Blueshifted" profiles in the classification scheme of Sternberg et al. (2011). This coincidence suggests that outflowing circumstellar gas is responsible for at least some of the cases of anomalously large Na I column densities. Two supernovae with unusually strong Na I D absorption showed essentially normal K I column densities for the dust extinction implied by their colors, but this does not appear to be a universal characteristic. Overall, we find the most accurate predictor of individual supernova extinction to be the equivalent width of the diffuse interstellar band at 5780 Angstroms, and provide an empirical relation for its use. Finally, we identify ways of producing significant enhancements of the Na abundance of circumstellar material in both the single-degenerate and double-degenerate scenarios for the progenitor system.
  • The impact of metallicity on the Cepheid Period-Luminosity (P-L) relation is investigated using HST ACS V and I images of M101. Variations in the reddening-free Wesenheit parameter (W), which is employed as a proxy for luminosity, are examined as a function of the radial distance from the center of M101 (and thus metallicity). We determine that there is no dependence of the slope on metallicity. However, the intercept is found to depend on metallicity by -0.33 +/- 0.12 mag/dex and -0.71 +/- 0.17 mag/dex using 2 and 3 sigma rejection criteria, respectively. Sigma-clipping impacts the derived metallicity dependence, and the 2-sigma criterion applied likely mitigates blending, particularly in the crowded inner regions of M101. A metallicity-corrected distance modulus of 28.96 +/- 0.11 for M101 is obtained from 619 Cepheids, a result that agrees with the recently determined SN Ia distance. The metallicity effects described can be bypassed by working at near and mid-infrared wavelengths (e.g., the Carnegie Hubble Program).
  • Using time-resolved, mid-infrared data from WISE and geometric parallaxes from HST for four Galactic RR Lyrae variables, we derive the following Population II Period-Luminosity (PL) relations for the WISE [W1], [W2] and [W3] bands at 3.4, 4.6 & 12 um, respectively: M[W1] = -2.44 (+/- 0.95) x logP - 1.26 (+/- 0.25) sigma = 0.10 M[W2] = -2.55 (+/- 0.89) x logP - 1.29 (+/- 0.23) sigma = 0.10 M[W3] = -2.58 (+/- 0.97) x logP - 1.32 (+/- 0.25) sigma = 0.10 The slopes and the scatter around the fits are consistent with a smooth extrapolation of those same quantities from previously-published K-band observations at 2.2 um, where the asymptotic (long-wavelength) behavior is consistent with a Period-Radius relation having a slope of 0.5. No obvious correlation with metallicity (spanning 0.4 dex in [Fe/H]) is found in the residuals of the four calibrating RR Lyrae stars about the mean PL regression line.
  • We have observed the dwarf galaxy IC 1613, at multiple epochs in the mid--infrared using Spitzer and contemporaneously in the near--infrared using the new FourStar near-IR camera on Magellan. We have constructed Cepheid period--luminosity relations in the J, H, K_s, [3.6] and [4.5] bands and have used the run of their apparent distance moduli as a function of wavelength to derive the line--of--sight reddening and distance to IC1613. Using a nine--band fit, we find E(B-V) = 0.05 +- 0.01 mag and an extinction--corrected distance modulus of mu_{0} = 24.29 +- 0.03_{statistical} +- 0.03_{systematic} mag. By comparing our multi--band and [3.6] distance moduli to results from the tip of the red giant branch and red clump distance indicators, we find that metallicity has no measurable effect on Cepheid distances at 3.6 microns in the metallicity range -1.0 < [Fe/H] < 0.2, hence derivations of the Hubble constant at this wavelength require no correction for metallicity.
  • This is the first release of optical spectroscopic data of low-redshift Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) by the Carnegie Supernova Project including 604 previously unpublished spectra of 93 SNe Ia. The observations cover a range of phases from 12 days before to over 150 days after the time of B-band maximum light. With the addition of 228 near-maximum spectra from the literature we study the diversity among SNe Ia in a quantitative manner. For that purpose, spectroscopic parameters are employed such as expansion velocities from spectral line blueshifts, and pseudo-equivalent widths (pW). The values of those parameters at maximum light are obtained for 78 objects, thus providing a characterization of SNe Ia that may help to improve our understanding of the properties of the exploding systems and the thermonuclear flame propagation. Two objects, namely SNe 2005M and 2006is, stand out from the sample by showing peculiar Si II and S II velocities but otherwise standard velocities for the rest of the ions. We further study the correlations between spectroscopic and photometric parameters such as light-curve decline rate and color. In agreement with previous studies, we find that the pW of Si II absorption features are very good indicators of light-curve decline rate. Furthermore, we demonstrate that parameters such as pW2(SiII4130) and pW6(SiII5972) provide precise calibrations of the peak B-band luminosity with dispersions of ~0.15 mag. In the search for a secondary parameter in the calibration of peak luminosity for SNe Ia, we find a ~2--3-sigma correlation between B-band Hubble residuals and the velocity at maximum light of S II and Si II lines.
  • Distance measures on a coherent scale around the sky are required to address the outstanding cosmological problems of the Hubble Constant and of departures from the mean cosmic flow. The correlation between galaxy luminosities and rotation rates can be used to determine distances to many thousands of galaxies in a wide range of environments potentially out to 200 Mpc. Mid-infrared (3.6 microns) photometry with the Spitzer Space Telescope is particularly valuable as the source of the luminosities because it provides products of uniform quality across the sky. From a perch above the atmosphere, essentially the total magnitude of targets can be registered in exposures of a few minutes. Extinction is minimal and the flux is dominated by the light from old stars which is expected to correlate with the mass of the targets. In spite of the superior photometry, the correlation between mid-infrared luminosities and rotation rates extracted from neutral hydrogen profiles is slightly degraded from the correlation found with I band luminosities. A color correction recovers a correlation that provides comparable accuracy to that available at I band (~20% 1sigma in an individual distance) while retaining the advantages identified above. Without the color correction the relation between linewidth and [3.6] magnitudes is M^{b,i,k,a}_{[3.6]} = -20.34 - 9.74 (log W_{mx}^{i} -2.5). This description is found with a sample of 213 galaxies in 13 clusters that define the slope and 26 galaxies with Cepheid or tip of the red giant branch distances that define the zero point. A color corrected parameter M_{C_{[3.6]}} is constructed that has reduced scatter: M_{C_{[3.6]}} = -20.34 - 9.13 (log W_{mx}^{i} -2.5). Consideration of the 7 calibration clusters beyond 50 Mpc, outside the domain of obvious peculiar velocities, provides a preliminary Hubble Constant estimate of H_0=74+/-5 km/s/Mpc.
  • The Carnegie Hubble Program (CHP) is designed to calibrate the extragalactic distance scale using data from the post-cryogenic era of the Spitzer Space Telescope. The ultimate goal of the CHP is a systematic improvement in the distance scale leading to a determination of the Hubble Constant to within an accuracy of 2%. This paper focuses on the measurement and calibration of the Galactic Cepheid Period-Luminosity (Leavitt) Relation using the warm Spitzer IRAC 1 and 2 bands at 3.6 and 4.5 \mu m. We present photometric measurements covering the period range 4 - 70 days for 37 Galactic Cepheids. Data at 24 phase points were collected for each star. Three PL relations of the form M=a(Log(P)-1)+b are derived. The method adopted here takes the slope a to be -3.31, as determined from the Spitzer LMC data of Scowcroft et al. (2012). Using the geometric HST guide-star distances to ten Galactic Cepheids we find a calibrated 3.6 micron PL zero-point of -5.80\pm0.03. Together with our value for the LMC zero-point we determine a reddening-corrected distance modulus of 18.48\pm0.04 mag to the LMC. The mid-IR Period-Color diagram and the [3.6] - [4.5] color variation with phase are interpreted in terms of CO absorption at 4.5 \mu m. This situation compromises the use of the 4.5 \mu m data for distance determinations.
  • Using a mid-infrared calibration of the Cepheid distance scale based on recent observations at 3.6 um with the Spitzer Space Telescope, we have obtained a new, high-accuracy calibration of the Hubble constant. We have established the mid-IR zero point of the Leavitt Law (the Cepheid Period-Luminosity relation) using time-averaged 3.6 um data for ten high-metallicity, Milky Way Cepheids having independently-measured trigonometric parallaxes. We have adopted the slope of the PL relation using time-averaged 3.6 um data for 80 long-period Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) Cepheids falling in the period range 0.8 < log(P) < 1.8. We find a new reddening-corrected distance to the LMC of 18.477 +/- 0.033 (systematic) mag. We re-examine the systematic uncertainties in H0, also taking into account new data over the past decade. In combination with the new Spitzer calibration, the systematic uncertainty in H0 over that obtained by the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Key Project has decreased by over a factor of three. Applying the Spitzer calibration to the Key Project sample, we find a value of H0 = 74.3 with a systematic uncertainty of +/-2.1 (systematic) km/s/Mpc, corresponding to a 2.8% systematic uncertainty in the Hubble constant. This result, in combination with WMAP7 measurements of the cosmic microwave background anisotropies and assuming a flat universe, yields a value of the equation of state for dark energy, w0 = -1.09 +/- 0.10. Alternatively, relaxing the constraints on flatness and the numbers of relativistic species, and combining our results with those of WMAP7, Type Ia supernovae and baryon acoustic oscillations yields w0 = -1.08 +/- 0.10 and a value of N_eff = 4.13 +/- 0.67, mildly consistent with the existence of a fourth neutrino species.
  • We analyze the standardizability of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) in the near-infrared (NIR) by investigating the correlation between observed peak NIR absolute magnitude and post-maximum B-band decline rate. A sample of 27 low-redshift SNe Ia observed by the Carnegie Supernova Project between 2004 to 2007 is used. All 27 objects have pre-maximum coverage in optical bands, with a subset of 13 having pre-maximum NIR observations as well. We describe the methods used to derive absolute peak magnitudes and decline rates from both spline- and template-fitting procedures, and confirm prior findings that fitting templates to SNe Ia light curves in the NIR is problematic due to the diversity of post-maximum behaviour of objects that are characterized by similar decline rate values, especially at high decline rates. Nevertheless, we show that NIR light curves can be reasonably fit with a template, especially if the observations begin within 5 days after NIR maximum. For the subset of 13 objects in our dataset that excludes the highly reddened and fast declining SNe Ia, and includes only those objects for which NIR observations began prior to five days after maximum light, we find modest evidence for a peak luminosity-decline rate relation in Y, and stronger evidence in J and H. Using Rv values differing from the canonical value of 3.1 is shown to have little effect on the results. A Hubble diagram is presented for the NIR bands and the B band. The resulting scatter for the combined NIR bands is 0.13 mag, while the B band produces a scatter of 0.22 mag. The data suggest that applying a correction to SNe Ia peak luminosities for decline rate is likely to be beneficial in the J and H bands to make SNe Ia more precise distance indicators, but of only marginal importance in the Y band.