• We construct optimal designs for group testing experiments where the goal is to estimate the prevalence of a trait by using a test with uncertain sensitivity and specificity. Using optimal design theory for approximate designs, we show that the most efficient design for simultaneously estimating the prevalence, sensitivity and specificity requires three different group sizes with equal frequencies. However, if estimating prevalence as accurately as possible is the only focus, the optimal strategy is to have three group sizes with unequal frequencies. On the basis of a chlamydia study in the U.S.A., we compare performances of competing designs and provide insights into how the unknown sensitivity and specificity of the test affect the performance of the prevalence estimator. We demonstrate that the locally D- and Ds-optimal designs proposed have high efficiencies even when the prespecified values of the parameters are moderately misspecified.
  • Much of the work in the literature on optimal discrimination designs assumes that the models of interest are fully specified, apart from unknown parameters in some models. Recent work allows errors in the models to be non-normally distributed but still requires the specification of the mean structures. This research is motivated by the interesting work of Otsu (2008) to discriminate among semi-parametric models by generalizing the KL-optimality criterion proposed by L\'opez-Fidalgo et al. (2007) and Tommasi and L\'opez-Fidalgo (2010). In our work we provide further important insights in this interesting optimality criterion. In particular, we propose a practical strategy for finding optimal discrimination designs among semi-parametric models that can also be verified using an equivalence theorem. In addition, we study properties of such optimal designs and identify important cases where the proposed semi-parametric optimal discrimination designs coincide with the celebrated T -optimal designs.
  • Identifying optimal designs for generalized linear models with a binary response can be a challenging task, especially when there are both continuous and discrete independent factors in the model. Theoretical results rarely exist for such models, and the handful that do exist come with restrictive assumptions. This paper investigates the use of particle swarm optimization (PSO) to search for locally $D$-optimal designs for generalized linear models with discrete and continuous factors and a binary outcome and demonstrates that PSO can be an effective method. We provide two real applications using PSO to identify designs for experiments with mixed factors: one to redesign an odor removal study and the second to find an optimal design for an electrostatic discharge study. In both cases we show that the $D$-efficiencies of the designs found by PSO are much better than the implemented designs. In addition, we show PSO can efficiently find $D$-optimal designs on a prototype or an irregularly shaped design space, provide insights on the existence of minimally supported optimal designs, and evaluate sensitivity of the $D$-optimal design to mis-specifications in the link function.
  • Nonlinear regression models addressing both efficacy and toxicity outcomes are increasingly used in dose-finding trials, such as in pharmaceutical drug development. However, research on related experimental design problems for corresponding active controlled trials is still scarce. In this paper we derive optimal designs to estimate efficacy and toxicity in an active controlled clinical dose finding trial when the bivariate continuous outcomes are modeled either by polynomials up to degree 2, the Michaelis- Menten model, the Emax model, or a combination thereof. We determine upper bounds on the number of different doses levels required for the optimal design and provide conditions under which the boundary points of the design space are included in the optimal design. We also provide an analytical description of the minimally supported $D$-optimal designs and show that they do not depend on the correlation between the bivariate outcomes. We illustrate the proposed methods with numerical examples and demonstrate the advantages of the $D$-optimal design for a trial, which has recently been considered in the literature.
  • We consider design issues for toxicology studies when we have a continuous response and the true mean response is only known to be a member of a class of nested models. This class of non-linear models was proposed by toxicologists who were concerned only with estimation problems. We develop robust and efficient designs for model discrimination and for estimating parameters in the selected model at the same time. In particular, we propose designs that maximize the minimum of $D$- or $D_1$-efficiencies over all models in the given class. We show that our optimal designs are efficient for determining an appropriate model from the postulated class, quite efficient for estimating model parameters in the identified model and also robust with respect to model misspecification. To facilitate the use of optimal design ideas in practice, we have also constructed a website that freely enables practitioners to generate a variety of optimal designs for a range of models and also enables them to evaluate the efficiency of any design.
  • We construct optimal designs for estimating fetal malformation rate, prenatal death rate and an overall toxicity index in a toxicology study under a broad range of model assumptions. We use Weibull distributions to model these rates and assume that the number of implants depend on the dose level. We study properties of the optimal designs when the intra-litter correlation coefficient depends on the dose levels in different ways. Locally optimal designs are found, along with robustified versions of the designs that are less sensitive to misspecification in the initial values of the model parameters. We also report efficiencies of commonly used designs in toxicological experiments and efficiencies of the proposed optimal designs when the true rates have non-Weibull distributions. Optimal design strategies for finding multiple-objective designs in toxicology studies are outlined as well.
  • Nonregular fractional factorial designs such as Plackett-Burman designs and other orthogonal arrays are widely used in various screening experiments for their run size economy and flexibility. The traditional analysis focuses on main effects only. Hamada and Wu (1992) went beyond the traditional approach and proposed an analysis strategy to demonstrate that some interactions could be entertained and estimated beyond a few significant main effects. Their groundbreaking work stimulated much of the recent developments in design criterion creation, construction and analysis of nonregular designs. This paper reviews important developments in optimality criteria and comparison, including projection properties, generalized resolution, various generalized minimum aberration criteria, optimality results, construction methods and analysis strategies for nonregular designs.