• We probe ultra-strong light matter coupling between metallic terahertz metasurfaces and Landau-level transitions in high mobility 2D electron and hole gases. We utilize heavy-hole cyclotron resonances in strained Ge and electron cyclotron resonances in InSb quantum wells, both within highly non-parabolic bands, and compare our results to well known parabolic AlGaAs/GaAs quantum well (QW) systems. Tuning the coupling strength of the system by two methods, lithographically and by optical pumping, we observe a novel behavior clearly deviating from the standard Hopfield model previously verified in cavity quantum electrodynamics: an opening of a lower polaritonic gap.
  • The interaction between electrons in arrays of electrostatically defined quantum dots is naturally described by a Fermi-Hubbard Hamiltonian. Moreover, the high degree of tunability of these systems make them a powerful platform to simulate different regimes of the Hubbard model. However, most quantum dot array implementations have been limited to one-dimensional linear arrays. In this letter, we present a square lattice unit cell of 2$\times$2 quantum dots defined electrostatically in a AlGaAs/GaAs heterostructure using a double-layer gate technique. We probe the properties of the array using nearby quantum dots operated as charge sensors. We show that we can deterministically and dynamically control the charge occupation in each quantum dot in the single- to few-electron regime. Additionally, we achieve simultaneous individual control of the nearest-neighbor tunnel couplings over a range 0-40~$\mu$eV. Finally, we demonstrate fast ($\sim 1$~$\mu$s) single-shot readout of the spin state of electrons in the dots, through spin-to-charge conversion via Pauli spin blockade. These advances pave the way to analog quantum simulations in two dimensions, not previously accessible in quantum dot systems.
  • Nonperturbative coupling between cavity photons and excitons leads to formation of hybrid light-matter excitations termed polaritons. In structures where photon absorption leads to creation of excitons with aligned permanent dipoles, the elementary excitations, termed dipolar polaritons, are expected to exhibit enhanced interactions. Here, we report a substantial increase in interaction strength between dipolar polaritons as the size of the dipole is increased by tuning the applied gate voltage. To this end, we use coupled quantum well structures embedded inside a microcavity where coherent electron tunneling between the wells controls the size of the excitonic dipole. Modifications of the interaction strength are characterized by measuring the changes in the reflected intensity of light when polaritons are driven with a resonant laser. Factor of 6.5 increase in the interaction strength to linewidth ratio that we obtain indicates that dipolar polaritons could be used to demonstrate a polariton blockade effect and thereby form the building blocks of many-body states of light.
  • Scalable architectures for quantum information technologies require to selectively couple long-distance qubits while suppressing environmental noise and cross-talk. In semiconductor materials, the coherent coupling of a single spin on a quantum dot to a cavity hosting fermionic modes offers a new solution to this technological challenge. Here, we demonstrate coherent coupling between two spatially separated quantum dots using an electronic cavity design that takes advantage of whispering-gallery modes in a two-dimensional electron gas. The cavity-mediated long-distance coupling effectively minimizes undesirable direct cross-talk between the dots and defines a scalable architecture for all-electronic semiconductor-based quantum information processing.
  • The spin-flip tunneling rates are measured in GaAs-based double quantum dots by time-resolved charge detection. Such processes occur in the Pauli spin blockade regime with two electrons occupying the double quantum dot. Ways are presented for tuning the spin-flip tunneling rate, which on the one hand gives access to measuring the Rashba and Dresselhaus spin--orbit coefficents. On the other hand they make it possible to turn on and off the effect of SOI with a high on/off-ratio. The tuning is accomplished by choosing the alignment of the tunneling direction with respect to the crystallographic axes, as well as by choosing the orientation of the external magnetic field with respect to the spin--orbit magnetic field. Spin-lifetimes of 10 s are achieved at a tunnel rate close to 1 kHz.
  • Elementary quasi-particles in a two dimensional electron system can be described as exciton-polarons since electron-exciton interactions ensures dressing of excitons by Fermi-sea electron-hole pair excitations. A relevant open question is the modification of this description when the electrons occupy flat-bands and electron-electron interactions become prominent. Here, we perform cavity spectroscopy of a two dimensional electron system in the strong-coupling regime where polariton resonances carry signatures of strongly correlated quantum Hall phases. By measuring the evolution of the polariton splitting under an external magnetic field, we demonstrate the modification of electron-exciton interactions that we associate with phase space filling at integer filling factors and polaron dressing at fractional filling factors. The observed non-linear behavior shows great promise for enhancing polariton-polariton interactions.
  • We investigate different methods of passivating sidewalls of wet etched InAs heterostructures in order to suppress inherent edge conduction that is presumed to occur due to band bending at the surface leading to charge carrier accumulation. Passivation techniques including sulfur, positively charged compensation dopants and plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition of $\mathrm{SiN}_{\mathrm{x}}$ do not show an improvement. Surprisingly, atomic layer deposition of $\mathrm{Al}_{\mathrm{2}}\mathrm{O}_{\mathrm{3}}$ leads to an increase in edge resistivity of more than an order of magnitude. While the mechanism behind this change is not fully understood, possible reasons are suggested.
  • We investigate low-temperature transport through single InAs quantum wells and broken-gap InAs/GaSb double quantum wells. Non-local measurements in the regime beyond bulk pinch-off confirm the presence of edge conduction in InAs quantum wells. The edge resistivity of 1-2 $\mathrm{k\Omega/\mu m}$ is of the same order of magnitude as edge resistivities measured in the InAs/GaSb double quantum well system. Measurements in tilted magnetic field suggests an anisotropy of the conducting regions at the edges with a larger extent in the plane of the sample than normal to it. Finger gate samples on both material systems shine light on the length dependence of the edge resistance with the intent to unravel the nature of edge conduction in InAs/GaSb coupled quantum wells.
  • We present transport measurements on a lateral p-n junction in an inverted InAs/GaSb double quantum well at zero and nonzero perpendicular magnetic fields. At a zero magnetic field, the junction exhibits diodelike behavior in accordance with the presence of a hybridization gap. With an increasing magnetic field, we explore the quantum Hall regime where spin-polarized edge states with the same chirality are either reflected or transmitted at the junction, whereas those of opposite chirality undergo a mixing process, leading to full equilibration along the width of the junction independent of spin. These results lay the foundations for using p-n junctions in InAs/GaSb double quantum wells to probe the transition between the topological quantum spin Hall and quantum Hall states.
  • We report a precise experimental study on the shot noise of a quantum point contact (QPC) fabricated in a GaAs/AlGaAs based high-mobility two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG). The combination of unprecedented cleanliness and very high measurement accuracy has enabled us to discuss the Fano factor to characterize the shot noise with a precision of 1 %. We observed that the shot noise at zero magnetic field exhibits a slight enhancement exceeding the single particle theoretical prediction, and that it gradually decreases as a perpendicular magnetic field is applied. We also confirmed that this additional noise completely vanishes in the quantum Hall regime. These phenomena can be explained by the electron heating effect near the QPC, which is suppressed with increasing magnetic field.
  • We report on the detection of the intrinsic spin Hall effect in a modulation doped Al-GaAs/GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure bounded by a self-aligned pn-junction, fabricated by the cleaved edge overgrowth method. Light emission due to the recombination of electrons and spin-polarized holes was generated and mapped with a spatial resolution of one micrometer. An edge accumulated spin polarization of up to 11% was measured, induced solely by application of an electric Field perpendicular to the pn-junction. Using a quantum dot structure as light source, a linear dependence of the effective spin polarization, and with that the dominance of the spin Hall effect, with the electric field is seen. Spatially resolved spectroscopy from an epitaxially fabricated LED is demonstrated to be a valuable tool to probe the edge states of electron and hole gases in reduced dimensions.
  • Two-electron charged self-assembled quantum dot molecules exhibit a decoherence-avoiding singlet-triplet qubit subspace and an efficient spin-photon interface. We demonstrate quantum entanglement between emitted photons and the spin-qubit after the emission event. We measure the overlap with a fully entangled state to be $69.5\pm2.7\,\%$, exceeding the threshold of $50\,\%$ required to prove the non-separability of the density matrix of the system. The photonic qubit is encoded in two photon states with an energy difference larger than the timing resolution of existing detectors. We devise a novel heterodyne detection method, enabling projective measurements of such photonic color qubits along any direction on the Bloch sphere.
  • We measure tunnelling currents through electrostatically defined quantum dots in a GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure connected to two leads. For certain tunnelling barrier configurations and high sample bias we find a pronounced resonance associated with a Fermi edge singularity. This many-body scattering effect appears when the electrochemical potential of the quantum dot is aligned with the Fermi level of the lead less coupled to the dot. By changing the relative tunnelling barrier strength we are able to tune the interaction of the localised electron with the Fermi sea.
  • Scanning gate microscopy measurements in a circular ballistic cavity with a tip placed near its center yield a non-monotonic dependence of the conductance on the tip voltage. Detailed numerical quantum calculations reproduce these conductance oscillations, and a classical scheme leads to its physical understanding. The large-amplitude conductance oscillations are shown to be of classical origin, and well described by the effect of a particular class of short trajectories.
  • The strong coupling limit of cavity quantum electrodynamics (QED) implies the capability of a matter-like quantum system to coherently transform an individual excitation into a single photon within a resonant structure. This not only enables essential processes required for quantum information processing but also allows for fundamental studies of matter-light interaction. In this work we demonstrate strong coupling between the charge degree of freedom in a gate-detuned GaAs double quantum dot (DQD) and a frequency-tunable high impedance resonator realized using an array of superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs). In the resonant regime, we resolve the vacuum Rabi mode splitting of size $2g/2\pi = 238$ MHz at a resonator linewidth $\kappa/2\pi = 12$ MHz and a DQD charge qubit dephasing rate of $\gamma_2/2\pi = 80$ MHz extracted independently from microwave spectroscopy in the dispersive regime. Our measurements indicate a viable path towards using circuit based cavity QED for quantum information processing in semiconductor nano-structures.
  • Photogenerated excitonic ensembles confined in coupled GaAs quantum wells are probed by a complementary approach of emission spectroscopy and resonant inelastic light scattering. Lateral electrostatic trap geometries are used to create dense systems of spatially indirect excitons and excess holes with similar densities in the order of 10$^{11}$ cm$^{-2}$. Inelastic light scattering spectra reveal a very sharp low-lying collective mode that is identified at an energy of 0.44 meV and a FWHM of only ~50 $\mu$eV. This mode is interpreted as a plasmon excitation of the excess hole system coupled to the photogenerated indirect excitons. The emission energy of the indirect excitons shifts under the application of a perpendicular applied electric field with the quantum-confined Stark effect unperturbed from the presence of free charge carriers. Our results illustrate the potential of studying low-lying collective excitations in photogenerated exciton systems to explore the many-body phase diagram, related phase transitions, and interaction physics.
  • Transport measurements are performed on InAs/GaSb double quantum wells at zero and finite magnetic fields applied parallel and perpendicular to the quantum wells. We investigate a sample in the inverted regime where electrons and holes coexist, and compare it with another sample in the non-inverted semiconducting regime. Activated behavior in conjunction with a strong suppression of the resistance peak at the charge neutrality point in a parallel magnetic field attest to the topological hybridization gap between electron and hole bands in the inverted sample. We observe an unconventional Landau level spectrum with energy gaps modulated by the magnetic field applied perpendicular to the quantum wells. This is caused by strong spin-orbit interaction provided jointly by the InAs and the GaSb quantum wells.
  • We report on a combined photoluminescence imaging and atomic force microscopy study of single, isolated self-assembled InAs quantum dots (density <0.01 um^(-2) capped by a 95 nm GaAs layer, and emitting around 950 nm. By combining optical and scanning probe characterization techniques, we determine the position of single quantum dots with respect to comparatively large (100 nm to 1000 nm in-plane dimension) topographic features. We find that quantum dots often appear (>25% of the time) in the vicinity of these features, but generally do not exhibit significant differences in their non-resonantly pumped emission spectra in comparison to quantum dots appearing in defect-free regions. This behavior is observed across multiple wafers produced in different growth chambers. Our characterization approach is relevant to applications in which single quantum dots are embedded within nanofabricated photonic devices, where such large surface features can affect the interaction with confined optical fields and the quality of the single-photon emission. In particular, we anticipate using this approach to screen quantum dots not only based on their optical properties, but also their surrounding surface topographies.
  • Cavity photon resonators with ultrastrong light-matter interactions are attracting interest both in semiconductor and superconducting systems displaying the capability to manipulate the cavity quantum electrodynamic ground state with controllable physical properties. Here we review a series of experiments aimed at probing the ultrastrong light-matter coupling regime, where the vacuum Rabi splitting $\Omega$ is comparable to the bare transition frequency $\omega$ . We present a new platform where the inter-Landau level transition of a two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) is strongly coupled to the fundamental mode of deeply subwavelength split-ring resonators operating in the mm-wave range. Record-high values of the normalized light-matter coupling ratio $\frac{\Omega}{\omega}= 0.89$ are reached and the system appears highly scalable far into the microwave range.
  • While thermodynamics is a useful tool to describe the driving of large systems close to equilibrium, fluctuations dominate the distribution of heat and work in small systems and far from equilibrium. We study the heat generated by driving a small system and change the drive parameters to analyse the transition from a drive leaving the system close to equilibrium to driving it far from equilibrium. Our system is a quantum dot in a GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure hosting a two-dimensional electron gas. The dot is tunnel-coupled to one part of the two-dimensional electron gas acting as a heat and particle reservoir. We use standard rate equations to model the driven dot-reservoir system and find excellent agreement with the experiment. Additionally, we quantify the fluctuations by experimentally test the theoretical concept of the arrow of time, predicting our ability to distinguish whether a process goes in the forward or backward drive direction.
  • We present a gating scheme to separate even strong parallel conductance from the magneto-transport signatures and properties of a two-dimensional electron system. By varying the electron density in the parallel conducting layer, we can study the impact of mobile charge carriers in the vicinity of the dopant layer on the properties of the two-dimensional electron system. It is found that the parallel conducting layer is indeed capable to screen the remote ionized impurity potential fluctuations responsible for the fragility of fractional quantum Hall states.
  • Electron-hole hybridization in InAs/GaSb double quantum well structures leads to the formation of a mini band gap. We experimentally and theoretically studied the impact of strain on the transport properties of this material system. Thinned samples were mounted to piezo electric elements to exert strain along the [011] and [001] crystal directions. When the Fermi energy is tuned through the mini gap, a dramatic impact on the resistivity at the charge neutrality point is found which depends on the amount of applied external strain. In the electron and hole regimes, strain influences the Landau level structure. By analyzing the intrinsic strain from the epitaxial growth, the external strain from the piezo elements and combining our experimental results with numerical simulations of strained and unstrained quantum wells, we compellingly illustrate why the InAs/GaSb material system is regularly found to be semimetallic.
  • We demonstrate an experimental method for measuring quantum state degeneracies in bound state energy spectra. The technique is based on the general principle of detailed balance, and the ability to perform precise and efficient measurements of energy-dependent tunnelling-in and -out rates from a reservoir. The method is realized using a GaAs/AlGaAs quantum dot allowing for the detection of time-resolved single-electron tunnelling with a precision enhanced by a feedback-control. It is thoroughly tested by tuning orbital and spin-degeneracies with electric and magnetic fields. The technique also lends itself for studying the connection between the ground state degeneracy and the lifetime of the excited states.
  • We use the voltage biased tip of a scanning force microscope at a temperature of 35\,mK to locally induce the fractional quantum Hall state of $\nu=1/3$ in a split-gate defined constriction. Different tip positions allow us to vary the potential landscape. From temperature dependence of the conductance plateau at $G=1/3 \times e^2/h$ we determine the activation energy of this local $\nu=1/3$ state. We find that at a magnetic field of 6\,T the activation energy is between 153\,$\mu$eV and 194\,$\mu$eV independent of the shape of the confining potential, but about 50\% lower than for bulk samples.
  • In a quantum Hall ferromagnet, the spin polarization of the two-dimensional electron system can be dynamically transferred to nuclear spins in its vicinity through the hyperfine interaction. The resulting nuclear field typically acts back locally, modifying the local electronic Zeeman energy. Here we report a non-local effect arising from the interplay between nuclear polarization and the spatial structure of electronic domains in a $\nu=2/3$ fractional quantum Hall state. In our experiments, we use a quantum point contact to locally control and probe the domain structure of different spin configurations emerging at the spin phase transition. Feedback between nuclear and electronic degrees of freedom gives rise to memristive behavior, where electronic transport through the quantum point contact depends on the history of current flow. We propose a model for this effect which suggests a novel route to studying edge states in fractional quantum Hall systems and may account for so-far unexplained oscillatory electronic-transport features observed in previous studies.