• Previous studies using numerical simulations have demonstrated that the shape of the cosmic web can be described by studying the Lagrangian displacement field. We extend these analyses, showing that it is now possible to perform a Lagrangian description of cosmic structure in the nearby Universe based on large-scale structure observations. Building upon recent Bayesian large-scale inference of initial conditions, we present a cosmographic analysis of the dark matter distribution and its evolution, referred to as the dark matter phase-space sheet, in the nearby universe as probed by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey main galaxy sample. We consider its stretchings and foldings using a tetrahedral tessellation of the Lagrangian lattice. The method provides extremely accurate estimates of nearby density and velocity fields, even in regions of low galaxy density. It also measures the number of matter streams, and the deformation and parity reversals of fluid elements, which were previously thought inaccessible using observations. We illustrate the approach by showing the phase-space structure of known objects of the nearby Universe such as the Sloan Great Wall, the Coma cluster and the Bo\"otes void. We dissect cosmic structures into four distinct components (voids, sheets, filaments, and clusters), using the Lagrangian classifiers DIVA, ORIGAMI, and a new scheme which we introduce and call LICH. Because these classifiers use information other than the sheer local density, identified structures explicitly carry physical information about their formation history. Accessing the phase-space structure of dark matter in galaxy surveys opens the way for new confrontations of observational data and theoretical models. We have made our data products publicly available.
  • We use baryon acoustic oscillation and redshift space distortion from the completed Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey, corresponding to data release 12 of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, combined sample analysis in combination with cosmic microwave background, supernova and redshift space distortion measurements from additional spectroscopic surveys to test deviations from general relativity. We present constraints on several phenomenological models of modified gravity: First, we parametrise the growth of structure using the growth index $\gamma$, finding $\gamma=0.566\pm0.058$ (68\% C.L.). Second, we modify the relation of the two Newtonian potentials by introducing two additional parameters, $G_M$ and $G_L$. In this approach, $G_M$ refers to modifications of the growth of structure whereas $G_L$ to modification of the lensing potential. We consider a power law to model the redshift dependency of $G_M$ and $G_L$ as well as binning in redshift space, introducing four additional degrees of freedom, $G_M(z<0.5)$, $G_M(z>0.5)$, $G_L(z<0.5)$, $G_L(z>0.5)$. At 68\% C.L. we measure $G_M=0.980 \pm 0.096$ and $G_L=1.082 \pm 0.060$ for a linear model, $G_M= 1.01\pm 0.36$ and $G_L=1.31 \pm 0.19$ for a cubic model as well as $G_M(z<0.5)=1.26 \pm 0.32$, $G_M(z>0.5)=0.986\pm0.022$, $G_L(z<0.5)=1.067\pm0.058$ and $G_L(z>0.5)=1.037\pm0.029$. Thirdly, we investigate general scalar tensor theories of gravity, finding the model to be mostly unconstrained by current data. Assuming a one-parameter $f(R)$ model we can constrain $B_0< 7.7 \times 10^{-5}$ (95\% C.L). For all models we considered we find good agreement with general relativity.
  • The low statistical errors on cosmological parameters promised by future galaxy surveys will only be realised with the development of new, fast, analysis methods that reduce potential systematic problems to low levels. We present an efficient method for measuring the evolution of the growth of structure using Redshift Space Distortions (RSD), that removes the need to make measurements in redshift shells. We provide sets of galaxy-weights that cover a wide range in redshift, but are optimised to provide differential information about cosmological evolution. These are derived to optimally measure the coefficients of a parameterisation of the redshift-dependent matter density, which provides a framework to measure deviations from the concordance $\Lambda$CDM cosmology, allowing for deviations in both geometric and/or growth. We test the robustness of the weights by comparing with alternative schemes and investigate the impact of galaxy bias. We extend the results to measure the combined anisotropic Baryon Acoustic Oscillation (BAO) and RSD signals.
  • Euclid is a European Space Agency medium class mission selected for launch in 2020 within the Cosmic Vision 2015 2025 program. The main goal of Euclid is to understand the origin of the accelerated expansion of the universe. Euclid will explore the expansion history of the universe and the evolution of cosmic structures by measuring shapes and redshifts of galaxies as well as the distribution of clusters of galaxies over a large fraction of the sky. Although the main driver for Euclid is the nature of dark energy, Euclid science covers a vast range of topics, from cosmology to galaxy evolution to planetary research. In this review we focus on cosmology and fundamental physics, with a strong emphasis on science beyond the current standard models. We discuss five broad topics: dark energy and modified gravity, dark matter, initial conditions, basic assumptions and questions of methodology in the data analysis. This review has been planned and carried out within Euclid's Theory Working Group and is meant to provide a guide to the scientific themes that will underlie the activity of the group during the preparation of the Euclid mission.
  • Sound waves from the primordial fluctuations of the Universe imprinted in the large-scale structure, called baryon acoustic oscillations (BAOs), can be used as standard rulers to measure the scale of the Universe. These oscillations have already been detected in the distribution of galaxies. Here we propose to measure BAOs from the troughs (minima) of the density field. Based on two sets of accurate mock halo catalogues with and without BAOs in the seed initial conditions, we demonstrate that the BAO signal cannot be obtained from the clustering of classical disjoint voids, but is clearly detected from overlapping voids. The latter represent an estimate of all troughs of the density field. We compute them from the empty circumsphere centers constrained by tetrahedra of galaxies using Delaunay triangulation. Our theoretical models based on an unprecedented large set of detailed simulated void catalogues are remarkably well confirmed by observational data. We use the largest recently publicly available sample of luminous red galaxies from SDSS-III BOSS DR11 to unveil for the first time a >3$\sigma$ BAO detection from voids in observations. Since voids are nearly isotropically expanding regions, their centers represent the most quiet places in the Universe, keeping in mind the cosmos origin and providing a new promising window in the analysis of the cosmological large-scale structure from galaxy surveys.
  • Euclid is a European Space Agency medium class mission selected for launch in 2019 within the Cosmic Vision 2015-2025 programme. The main goal of Euclid is to understand the origin of the accelerated expansion of the Universe. Euclid will explore the expansion history of the Universe and the evolution of cosmic structures by measuring shapes and redshifts of galaxies as well as the distribution of clusters of galaxies over a large fraction of the sky. Although the main driver for Euclid is the nature of dark energy, Euclid science covers a vast range of topics, from cosmology to galaxy evolution to planetary research. In this review we focus on cosmology and fundamental physics, with a strong emphasis on science beyond the current standard models. We discuss five broad topics: dark energy and modified gravity, dark matter, initial conditions, basic assumptions and questions of methodology in the data analysis. This review has been planned and carried out within Euclid's Theory Working Group and is meant to provide a guide to the scientific themes that will underlie the activity of the group during the preparation of the Euclid mission.
  • The observed distribution of galaxies has local transverse isotropy around the line-of- sight (LOS) with respect to the observer. The difference in the statistical clustering signal along and across the line-of-sight encodes important information about the ge- ometry of the Universe, its expansion rate and the rate of growth of structure within it. Because the LOS varies across a survey, the standard Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) based methods of measuring the Anisotropic Power-Spectrum (APS) cannot be used for surveys with wide observational footprint, other than to measure the monopole moment. We derive a simple analytic formula to quantify the bias for higher-order Legendre moments and we demonstrate that it is scale independent for a simple sur- vey model, and depends only on the observed area. We derive a similar numerical correction formula for recently proposed alternative estimators of the APS that are based on summing over galaxies rather than using an FFT, and can therefore in- corporate a varying LOS. We demonstrate that their bias depends on scale but not on the observed area. For a quadrupole the bias is always less than 1 per cent for k > 0.01h/Mpc at z > 0.32. For a hexadecapole the bias is below 5 per cent for k>0.05h/Mpc at z>0.32.
  • We present a phenomenological modification of the standard perturbation theory prediction for the bispectrum in redshift space that allows us to extend the model to mildly non-linear scales over a wide range of redshifts, $z\leq1.5$. We find that we can describe the bispectrum of dark matter particles with $\sim5%$ accuracy for $k_i\lesssim0.10\,h/{\rm Mpc}$ at $z=0$, for $k_i\lesssim0.15\,h/{\rm Mpc}$ at $z=0.5$, for $k_i\lesssim0.17\,h/{\rm Mpc}$ at $z=1.0$ and for $k_i\lesssim0.20\,h/{\rm Mpc}$ at $z=1.5$. We also test that the fitting formula is able to describe with similar accuracy the bispectrum of cosmologies with different $\Omega_m$, in the range $0.2\lesssim \Omega_m \lesssim 0.4$, and consequently with different values of the logarithmic grow rate $f$ at $z=0$, $0.4\lesssim f(z=0) \lesssim 0.6$. We apply this new formula to recover the bias parameters, $f$ and $\sigma_8$, by combining the redshift space power spectrum monopole and quadrupole with the bispectrum monopole for both dark matter particles and haloes. We find that the combination of these three statistics can break the degeneracy between $b_1$, $f$ and $\sigma_8$. For dark matter particles the new model can be used to recover $f$ and $\sigma_8$ with $\sim1%$ accuracy. For dark matter haloes we find that $f$ and $\sigma_8$ present larger systematic shifts, $\sim10%$. The systematic offsets arise because of limitations in the modelling of the interplay between bias and redshift space distortions, and represent a limitation as the statistical errors of forthcoming surveys reach this level. Conveniently, we find that these residual systematics are mitigated for combinations of parameters. The improvement on the modelling of the bispectrum presented in this paper will be useful for extracting information from current and future galaxy surveys. [abridged]
  • We explore the cosmological implications of the clustering wedges, xi_perp(s) and xi_para(s), of the CMASS Data Release 9 (DR9) sample of the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). These clustering wedges are defined by averaging the full two-dimensional correlation function, xi(mu,s), over the ranges 0<mu<0.5 and 0.5<mu<1, respectively. These measurements allow us to constrain the parameter combinations D_A(z)/r_s(z_d)=9.03 +- 0.21 and cz/(r_s(z_d)H(z)) = 12.14 +- 0.43 at the mean redsfhit of the sample, z=0.57. We combine the information from the clustering wedges with recent measurements of CMB, BAO and type Ia supernovae to obtain constraints on the cosmological parameters of the standard LCDM model and a number of potential extensions. The information encoded in the clustering wedges is most useful when the dark energy equation of state is allowed to deviate from its standard LCDM value. The combination of all datasets shows no evidence of a deviation from a constant dark energy equation of state, in which case we find w_DE = -1.013 +- 0.064, in complete agreement with a cosmological constant. We explore potential deviations from general relativity by constraining the growth rate f(z)=d ln D(a)/ d ln a, in which case the combination of the CMASS clustering wedges with CMB data implies f(z=0.57)=0.719 +- 0.094, in accordance with the predictions of GR. Our results clearly illustrate the additional constraining power of anisotropic clustering measurements with respect to that of angle-averaged quantities.
  • The Baryon Acoustic Oscillation (BAO) feature in the power spectrum of galaxies provides a standard ruler to probe the accelerated expansion of the Universe. The current surveys covering a comoving volume sufficient to unveil the BAO scale are limited to redshift $z \lesssim 0.7$. In this paper, we study several galaxy selection schemes aiming at building an emission-line-galaxy (ELG) sample in the redshift range $0.6<z<1.7$, that would be suitable for future BAO studies using the Baryonic Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) spectrograph on the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) telescope. We explore two different colour selections using both the SDSS and the Canada France Hawai Telescope Legacy Survey (CFHT-LS) photometry in the u, g, r, and i bands and evaluate their performance selecting luminous ELG. From about 2,000 ELG, we identified a selection scheme that has a 75 percent redshift measurement efficiency. This result confirms the feasibility of massive ELG surveys using the BOSS spectrograph on the SDSS telescope for a BAO detection at redshift $z\sim1$, in particular the proposed eBOSS experiment, which plans to use the SDSS telescope to combine the use of the BAO ruler with redshift space distortions using emission line galaxies and quasars in the redshift $0.6<z<2.2$.
  • We present a comprehensive study of 250,000 galaxies targeted by the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) up to z ~ 0.7 with the specific goal of identifying and characterising a population of galaxies that has evolved without significant merging. We compute a likelihood that each BOSS galaxy is a progenitor of the Luminous Red Galaxies (LRGs) sample, targeted by SDSS-I/II up z ~ 0.5, by using the fossil record of LRGs and their inferred star-formation histories, metallicity histories and dust content. We determine merger rates, luminosity growth rates and the evolution of the large-scale clustering between the two surveys, and we investigate the effect of using different stellar population synthesis models in our conclusions. We demonstrate that our sample is slowly evolving (of the order of 2 +/- 1.5% per Gyr by merging). Our conclusions refer to the bright and massive end of the galaxy population, with Mi0.55 < -22, and M* > 1E11.2 Msolar, corresponding roughly to 95% and 40% of the LRGs and BOSS galaxy populations, respectively. Our analysis further shows that any possible excess of flux in BOSS galaxies, when compared to LRGs, from potentially unresolved targets at z ~ 0.55 must be less than 1% in the r0.55-band (approximately equivalent to the g-band in the rest-frame of galaxies at z=0.55). When weighting the BOSS galaxies based on the predicted properties of the LRGs, and restricting the analysis to the reddest BOSS galaxies, we find an evolution of the large-scale clustering that is consistent with dynamical passive evolution, assuming a standard cosmology. We conclude that our likelihoods give a weighted sample that is as clean and as close to passive evolution (in dynamical terms, i.e. no or negligible merging) as possible, and that is optimal for cosmological studies.
  • Considering the matter power spectrum covariance matrix, it has recently been found that there is a potentially dominant effect on mildly non-linear scales due to power in modes of size equal to and larger than the survey volume. This {\it beat coupling} effect has been derived analytically in perturbation theory and while it has been tested with simulations, some questions remain unanswered. Moreover, there is an additional effect of these large modes, which has so far not been included in analytic studies, namely the effect on the estimated {\it average} density which enters the power spectrum estimate. In this article, we work out analytic, perturbation theory based expressions including both the beat coupling and this {\it local average effect} and we show that while, when isolated, beat coupling indeed causes large excess covariance in agreement with the literature, in a realistic scenario this is compensated almost entirely by the local average effect, leaving only $\sim 10 %$ of the excess. We test our analytic expressions by comparison to a suite of large N-body simulations. For the variances, we find excellent agreement with the analytic expressions for $k < 0.2 h$Mpc$^{-1}$ at $z=0.5$, while the correlation coefficients agree to beyond $k=0.4 h$Mpc$^{-1}$. As expected, the range of agreement increases towards higher redshift and decreases slightly towards $z=0$. We finish by including the large-mode effects in a full covariance matrix description for arbitrary survey geometry and confirming its validity using simulations. This may be useful as a stepping stone towards building an actual galaxy (or other tracer's) power spectrum covariance matrix. [abridged]
  • A space-based galaxy redshift survey would have enormous power in constraining dark energy and testing general relativity, provided that its parameters are suitably optimized. We study viable space-based galaxy redshift surveys, exploring the dependence of the Dark Energy Task Force (DETF) figure-of-merit (FoM) on redshift accuracy, redshift range, survey area, target selection, and forecast method. Fitting formulae are provided for convenience. We also consider the dependence on the information used: the full galaxy power spectrum P(k, P(k) marginalized over its shape, or just the Baryon Acoustic Oscillations (BAO). We find that the inclusion of growth rate information (extracted using redshift space distortion and galaxy clustering amplitude measurements) leads to a factor of ~ 3 improvement in the FoM, assuming general relativity is not modified. This inclusion partially compensates for the loss of information when only the BAO are used to give geometrical constraints, rather than using the full P(k) as a standard ruler. We find that a space-based galaxy redshift survey covering ~20,000 deg^2 over 0.5< z < 2 with \sigma_z/(1+z)<= 0.001 exploits a redshift range that is only easily accessible from space, extends to sufficiently low redshifts to allow both a vast 3-D map of the universe using a single tracer population, and overlaps with ground-based surveys to enable robust modeling of systematic effects. We argue that these parameters are close to their optimal values given current instrumental and practical constraints.
  • Complementary one-, two-, and three-dimensional tests for detecting the presence of substructure in clusters of galaxies are applied to recently obtained data from the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey. The sample of 25 clusters used in this study includes 16 clusters not previously investigated for substructure. Substructure is detected at or greater than the 99% CL level in at least one test for 21 of the 25 clusters studied here. From the results, it appears that low richness clusters commonly contain subclusters participating in mergers. About half of the clusters have two or more components within 0.5 h^{-1} Mpc of the cluster centroid, and at least three clusters (Abell 1139, Abell 1663, and Abell S333) exhibit velocity-position characteristics consistent with the presence of possible cluster rotation, shear, or infall dynamics. The geometry of certain features is consistent with influence by the host supercluster environments. In general, our results support the hypothesis that low richness clusters relax to structureless equilibrium states on very long dynamical time scales (if at all).
  • We derive the fraction of blue galaxies in a sample of clusters at z < 0.11 and the general field at the same redshift. The value of the blue fraction is observed to depend on the luminosity limit adopted, cluster-centric radius and, more generally, local galaxy density, but it does not depend on cluster properties. Changes in the blue fraction are due to variations in the relative proportions of red and blue galaxies but the star formation rate for these two galaxy groups remains unchanged. Our results are most consistent with a model where the star formation rate declines rapidly and the blue galaxies tend to be dwarfs and do not favour mechanisms where the Butcher-Oemler effect is caused by processes specific to the cluster environment.
  • We analyse the observed correlation between galaxy environment and H-alpha emission line strength, using volume-limited samples and group catalogues of 24968 galaxies drawn from the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey (Mb<-19.5) and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (Mr<-20.6). We characterise the environment by 1) Sigma_5, the surface number density of galaxies determined by the projected distance to the 5th nearest neighbour; and 2) rho1.1 and rho5.5, three-dimensional density estimates obtained by convolving the galaxy distribution with Gaussian kernels of dispersion 1.1 Mpc and 5.5 Mpc, respectively. We find that star-forming and quiescent galaxies form two distinct populations, as characterised by their H-alpha equivalent width, EW(Ha). The relative numbers of star-forming and quiescent galaxies varies strongly and continuously with local density. However, the distribution of EW(Ha) amongst the star-forming population is independent of environment. The fraction of star-forming galaxies shows strong sensitivity to the density on large scales, rho5.5, which is likely independent of the trend with local density, rho1.1. We use two differently-selected group catalogues to demonstrate that the correlation with galaxy density is approximately independent of group velocity dispersion, for sigma=200-1000 km/s. Even in the lowest density environments, no more than ~70 per cent of galaxies show significant H-alpha emission. Based on these results, we conclude that the present-day correlation between star formation rate and environment is a result of short-timescale mechanisms that take place preferentially at high redshift, such as starbursts induced by galaxy-galaxy interactions.
  • We have measured the equivalent width of the H-alpha emission line for 11006 galaxies brighter than M_b=-19 (LCDM) at 0.05<z<0.1 in the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey (2dF), in the fields of seventeen known galaxy clusters. The limited redshift range ensures that our results are insensitive to aperture bias, and to residuals from night sky emission lines. We use these measurements to trace mustar, the star formation rate normalized to Lstar, as a function of distance from the cluster centre, and local projected galaxy density. We find that the distribution of mustar steadily skews toward larger values with increasing distance from the cluster centre, converging to the field distribution at distances greater than ~3 times the virial radius. A correlation between star formation rate and local projected density is also found, which is independent of cluster velocity dispersion and disappears at projected densities below ~1 galaxy (brighter than M_b=-19) per Mpc^2. This characteristic scale corresponds approximately to the mean density at the cluster virial radius. The same correlation holds for galaxies more than two virial radii from the cluster centre. We conclude that environmental influences on galaxy properties are not restricted to cluster cores, but are effective in all groups where the density exceeds this critical value. The present day abundance of such systems, and the strong evolution of this abundance, makes it likely that hierarchical growth of structure plays a significant role in decreasing the global average star formation rate. Finally, the low star formation rates well beyond the virialised cluster rule out severe physical processes, such as ram pressure stripping of disk gas, as being completely responsible for the variations in galaxy properties with environment.
  • We have carried out a study of known clusters within the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey (2dFGRS) observed areas and have identified 431 Abell, 173 APM and 343 EDCC clusters. Precise redshifts, velocity dispersions and new centroids have been measured for the majority of these objects, and this information has been used to study the completeness of these catalogues, the level of contamination from foreground and background structures along the cluster's line of sight, the space density of the clusters as a function of redshift, and their velocity dispersion distributions. We find that the Abell and EDCC catalogues are contaminated at the level of about 10%, whereas the APM catalogue suffers only 5% contamination. If we use the original catalog centroids, the level of contamination rises to approximately 15% for the Abell and EDCC catalogues, showing that the presence of foreground and background groups may alter the richness of clusters in these catalogues. There is a deficiency of clusters at $z \sim 0.05$ that may correspond to a large underdensity in the Southern hemisphere. From the cumulative distribution of velocity dispersions for these clusters, we derive an upper limit to the space density of $\sigma > 1000 \kms$ clusters of $3.6 \times 10^{-6} \hdens$. This result is used to constrain models for structure formation; our data favour low-density cosmologies, subject to the usual assumptions concerning the shape and normalization of the power spectrum.