• Strong gravitational lensing by galaxy clusters has become a powerful tool for probing the high-redshift Universe, magnifying distant and faint background galaxies. Reliable strong lensing (SL) models are crucial for determining the intrinsic properties of distant, magnified sources and for constructing their luminosity function. We present here the first SL analysis of MACS J0308.9+2645 and PLCK G171.9-40.7, two massive galaxy clusters imaged with the Hubble Space Telescope in the framework of the Reionization Lensing Cluster Survey (RELICS). We use the Light-Traces-Mass modeling technique to uncover sets of multiply imaged galaxies and constrain the mass distribution of the clusters. Our SL analysis reveals that both clusters have particularly large Einstein radii ($\theta_E>30"$ for a source redshift of $z_s=2$), providing fairly large areas with high magnifications, useful for high-redshift galaxy searches ($\sim2$ arcmin$^{2}$ with $\mu>5$ to $\sim1$ arcmin$^{2}$ with $\mu>10$, similar to a typical \textit{Hubble Frontier Fields} cluster). We also find that MACS J0308.9+2645 hosts a promising, apparently bright (J$\sim23.2-24.6$ AB), multiply imaged high-redshift candidate at $z\sim6.4$. These images are amongst the brightest high-redshift candidates found in RELICS. Our mass models, including magnification maps, are made publicly available for the community through the Mikulski Archive for Space Telescopes.
  • Strong gravitational lensing by galaxy clusters magnifies background galaxies, enhancing our ability to discover statistically significant samples of galaxies at z>6, in order to constrain the high-redshift galaxy luminosity functions. Here, we present the first five lens models out of the Reionization Lensing Cluster Survey (RELICS) Hubble Treasury Program, based on new HST WFC3/IR and ACS imaging of the clusters RXC J0142.9+4438, Abell 2537, Abell 2163, RXC J2211.7-0349, and ACT-CLJ0102-49151. The derived lensing magnification is essential for estimating the intrinsic properties of high-redshift galaxy candidates, and properly accounting for the survey volume. We report on new spectroscopic redshifts of multiply imaged lensed galaxies behind these clusters, which are used as constraints, and detail our strategy to reduce systematic uncertainties due to lack of spectroscopic information. In addition, we quantify the uncertainty on the lensing magnification due to statistical and systematic errors related to the lens modeling process, and find that in all but one cluster, the magnification is constrained to better than 20% in at least 80% of the field of view, including statistical and systematic uncertainties. The five clusters presented in this paper span the range of masses and redshifts of the clusters in the RELICS program. We find that they exhibit similar strong lensing efficiencies to the clusters targeted by the Hubble Frontier Fields within the WFC3/IR field of view. Outputs of the lens models are made available to the community through the Mikulski Archive for Space Telescopes
  • We present a strong-lensing analysis of four massive galaxy clusters imaged with the Hubble Space Telescope in the framework of the Reionization Lensing Cluster Survey (RELICS). We use a Light-Traces-Mass modeling technique to uncover sets of multiply imaged galaxies, and constrain the mass distribution and strong-lensing properties of the clusters. The mass models we present here are the first published for Abell S295 and MACS J0159.8-0849. For Abell 697 (the tenth-highest Sunyaev-Zel'dovich mass cluster in the Planck catalog) and MACS J0025.4-1222 (the "baby bullet" cluster), thanks to RELICS data we are able to improve upon previous models. Our analysis for MACS J0025.4-1222 and Abell S295 shows a bimodal mass distribution following the cluster galaxy concentrations, in support of the merger scenarios proposed in previous studies for these clusters. In addition, the updated model for MACS J0025.4-1222 suggests a substantially smaller critical area than previously estimated. For MACS J0159.8-0849 and Abell 697 we find a single peak and relatively regular morphology, suggesting these are fairly relaxed clusters. Despite being smaller and less prominent lenses on average, three of the four clusters we analyze here seem to have lensing strengths similar to the typical Hubble Frontier Fields cluster in terms of the cumulative area above a certain magnification value (e.g., A($\mu>5$) $\sim 1-3$ arcmin$^2$, A($\mu>10$) $\sim 0.5-1.5$ arcmin$^2$), which in part can be attributed to their merging configurations. We make our lens models publicly available through the Mikulski Archive for Space Telescopes, including mass-density, deflection, shear and magnifications maps.
  • ZwCl 2341.1+0000, a merging galaxy cluster with disturbed X-ray morphology and widely separated ($\sim$3 Mpc) double radio relics, was thought to be an extremely massive ($10-30 \times 10^{14} M_\odot$) and complex system with little known about its merger history. We present JVLA 2-4 GHz observations of the cluster, along with new spectroscopy from our Keck/DEIMOS survey, and apply Gaussian Mixture Modeling to the three-dimensional distribution of 227 confirmed cluster galaxies. After adopting the Bayesian Information Criterion to avoid overfitting, which we discover can bias total dynamical mass estimates high, we find that a three-substructure model with a total dynamical mass estimate of $9.39 \pm 0.81 \times 10^{14} M_\odot$ is favored. We also present deep Subaru imaging and perform the first weak lensing analysis on this system, obtaining a weak lensing mass estimate of $5.57 \pm 2.47 \times 10^{14} M_\odot$. This is a more robust estimate because it does not depend on the dynamical state of the system, which is disturbed due to the merger. Our results indicate that ZwCl 2341.1+0000 is a multiple merger system comprised of at least three substructures, with the main merger that produced the radio relics occurring near to the plane of the sky, and a younger merger in the North occurring closer to the line of sight. Dynamical modeling of the main merger reproduces observed quantities (relic positions and polarizations, subcluster separation and radial velocity difference), if the merger axis angle of $\sim$10$^{+34}_{-6}$ degrees and the collision speed at pericenter is $\sim$1900$^{+300}_{-200}$ km/s.
  • We examine the effects of an impending cluster merger on galaxies in the large scale structure (LSS) RX J0910 at $z =1.105$. Using multi-wavelength data, including 102 spectral members drawn from the Observations of Redshift Evolution in Large Scale Environments (ORELSE) survey and precise photometric redshifts, we calculate star formation rates and map the specific star formation rate density of the LSS galaxies. These analyses along with an investigation of the color-magnitude properties of LSS galaxies indicate lower levels of star formation activity in the region between the merging clusters relative to the outskirts of the system. We suggest that gravitational tidal forces due to the potential of the merging halos may be the physical mechanism responsible for the observed suppression of star formation in galaxies caught between the merging clusters.
  • We analyze a rich dataset including Subaru/SuprimeCam, HST/ACS and WFC3, Keck/DEIMOS, Chandra/ACIS-I, and JVLA/C and D array for the merging galaxy cluster ZwCl 0008.8+5215. With a joint Subaru/HST weak gravitational lensing analysis, we identify two dominant subclusters and estimate the masses to be M$_{200}=\text{5.7}^{+\text{2.8}}_{-\text{1.8}}\times\text{10}^{\text{14}}\,\text{M}_{\odot}$ and 1.2$^{+\text{1.4}}_{-\text{0.6}}\times10^{14}$ M$_{\odot}$. We estimate the projected separation between the two subclusters to be 924$^{+\text{243}}_{-\text{206}}$ kpc. We perform a clustering analysis on confirmed cluster member galaxies and estimate the line of sight velocity difference between the two subclusters to be 92$\pm$164 km s$^{-\text{1}}$. We further motivate, discuss, and analyze the merger scenario through an analysis of the 42 ks of Chandra/ACIS-I and JVLA/C and D polarization data. The X-ray surface brightness profile reveals a remnant core reminiscent of the Bullet Cluster. The X-ray luminosity in the 0.5-7.0 keV band is 1.7$\pm$0.1$\times$10$^{\text{44}}$ erg s$^{-\text{1}}$ and the X-ray temperature is 4.90$\pm$0.13 keV. The radio relics are polarized up to 40$\%$. We implement a Monte Carlo dynamical analysis and estimate the merger velocity at pericenter to be 1800$^{+\text{400}}_{-\text{300}}$ km s$^{-\text{1}}$. ZwCl 0008.8+5215 is a low-mass version of the Bullet Cluster and therefore may prove useful in testing alternative models of dark matter. We do not find significant offsets between dark matter and galaxies, as the uncertainties are large with the current lensing data. Furthermore, in the east, the BCG is offset from other luminous cluster galaxies, which poses a puzzle for defining dark matter -- galaxy offsets.
  • Dark matter with a non-zero self-interacting cross section ($\sigma_{\rm SIDM}$) has been posited as a solution to a number of outstanding astrophysical mysteries. Many studies of merging galaxy clusters have given constraints on $\sigma_{\rm SIDM}$ based on the spatial offset between the member galaxy population and the dark matter distribution. Assuming $\sigma_{\rm SIDM} = 0$, how likely is it for us to see the galaxy-DM offset values observed in merging clusters of galaxies? To answer this question, we formulate a hypothesis test using data from Illustris, a $\Lambda$CDM cosmological simulation. We select 43 Illustris clusters and their galaxy members at z~0 and examine the accuracy of commonly used galaxy summary statistics, including kernel-density-estimation (KDE) luminosity peak, KDE number density peak, shrinking aperture, centroid and the location of the brightest cluster galaxy (BCG). We use the dark-matter particles to reproduce commonly adopted methods to identify dark-matter peaks based on gravitational lensing cluster maps. By analysing each cluster in 768 projections, we determine the optimistic noise floor in the measurements of the galaxy-DM offsets. We find that the choice of the galaxy summary statistics affects the inferred offset values substantially, with the BCG and the luminosity peak giving the tightest 68-th percentile offset levels, $\lesssim$ 4 kpc and $\lesssim$ 32 kpc, respectively. Shrinking aperture, number density and centroid give a large offset scatter of about 50-100 kpc at the 68-th percentile level, even for clusters with only one dominant mass component. Out of the 15 reported offsets from observed merging clusters that we examined, 13 of them are consistent with Illustris unrelaxed cluster offsets at the 2-sigma (95-th percentile) level, i.e. consistent with the hypothesis that $\Lambda$CDM is the true underlying physical model.
  • On the largest scales, the Universe consists of voids and filaments making up the cosmic web. Galaxy clusters are located at the knots in this web, at the intersection of filaments. Clusters grow through accretion from these large-scale filaments and by mergers with other clusters and groups. In a growing number of galaxy clusters, elongated Mpc-size radio sources have been found, so-called radio relics. These relics are thought to trace relativistic electrons in the intracluster plasma accelerated by low-Mach number collisionless shocks generated by cluster-cluster merger events. A long-standing problem is how low-Mach number shocks can accelerate electrons so efficiently to explain the observed radio relics. Here we report on the discovery of a direct connection between a radio relic and a radio galaxy in the merging galaxy cluster Abell 3411-3412. This discovery indicates that fossil relativistic electrons from active galactic nuclei are re-accelerated at cluster shocks. It also implies that radio galaxies play an important role in governing the non-thermal component of the intracluster medium in merging clusters.
  • We infer gravitational lensing shear and convergence fields from galaxy ellipticity catalogs under a spatial process prior for the lensing potential. We demonstrate the performance of our algorithm with simulated Gaussian-distributed cosmological lensing shear maps and a reconstruction of the mass distribution of the merging galaxy cluster Abell 781 using galaxy ellipticities measured with the Deep Lens Survey. Given interim posterior samples of lensing shear or convergence fields on the sky, we describe an algorithm to infer cosmological parameters via lens field marginalization. In the most general formulation of our algorithm we make no assumptions about weak shear or Gaussian distributed shape noise or shears. Because we require solutions and matrix determinants of a linear system of dimension that scales with the number of galaxies, we expect our algorithm to require parallel high-performance computing resources for application to ongoing wide field lensing surveys.
  • We present a Bayesian algorithm to combine optical imaging of unresolved objects from distinct epochs and observation platforms for orbit determination and tracking. By propagating the non-Gaussian uncertainties we are able to optimally combine imaging of arbitrary signal-to-noise ratios, allowing the integration of data from low-cost sensors. Our Bayesian approach to image characterization also allows large compression of imaging data without loss of statistical information. With a computationally efficient algorithm to combine multiple observation epochs and multiple telescopes, we show statistically optimal orbit inferences.
  • We have developed a maximum likelihood source detection method capable of detecting ultra-faint streaks with surface brightnesses approximately an order of magnitude fainter than the pixel level noise. Our maximum likelihood detection method is a model based approach that requires no a priori knowledge about the streak location, orientation, length, or surface brightness. This method enables discovery of typically undiscovered objects, and enables the utilization of low-cost sensors (i.e., higher-noise data). The method also easily facilitates multi-epoch co-addition. We will present the results from the application of this method to simulations, as well as real low earth orbit observations.
  • We present an analysis of the merging cluster MACS J1149.5+2223 using archival imaging from Subaru/Suprime-Cam and multi-object spectroscopy from Keck/DEIMOS and Gemini/GMOS. We employ two and three dimensional substructure tests and determine that MACS J1149.5+2223 is composed of two separate mergers between three subclusters occurring $\sim$1 Gyr apart. The primary merger gives rise to elongated X-ray morphology and a radio relic in the southeast. The brightest cluster galaxy is a member of the northern subcluster of the primary merger. This subcluster is very massive (16.7$^{+\text{1.25}}_{-\text{1.60}}\times\text{10}^{\text{14}}$ M$_{\odot}$). The southern subcluster is also very massive (10.8$^{+\text{3.37}}_{-\text{3.54}}\times\text{10}^{\text{14}}$ M$_{\odot}$), yet it lacks an associated X-ray surface brightness peak, and it has been unidentified previously despite the detailed study of this \emph{Frontier Field} cluster. A secondary merger is occurring in the north along the line of sight with a third, less massive, subcluster (1.20$^{+\text{0.19}}_{-\text{0.34}}\times\text{10}^{\text{14}}$ M$_{\odot}$). We perform a Monte Carlo dynamical analysis on the main merger and estimate a collision speed at pericenter of 2770$^{+\text{610}}_{-\text{310}}$ km s$^{-\text{1}}$. We show the merger to be returning from apocenter with core passage occurring 1.16$^{+\text{0.50}}_{-\text{0.25}}$ Gyr before the observed state. We identify the line of sight merging subcluster in a strong lensing analysis in the literature and show that it is likely bound to MACS J1149 despite having reached an extreme collision velocity of $\sim$4000 km s$^{-\text{1}}$.
  • The galaxy cluster RX J0603.3+4214 at z=0.225 is one of the rarest clusters boasting an extremely large (~2 Mpc) radio-relic. Because of the remarkable morphology of the relic, the cluster is nicknamed "Toothbrush Cluster". Although the cluster's underlying mass distribution is one of the critical pieces of information needed to reconstruct the merger scenario responsible for the puzzling radio-relic morphology, its proximity to the Galactic plane b~10 deg has imposed significant observational challenges. We present a high-resolution weak-lensing study of the cluster with Subaru/Suprime Cam and Hubble Space Telescope imaging data. Our mass reconstruction reveals that the cluster is comprised of complicated dark matter substructures closely tracing the galaxy distribution, however in contrast with the relatively simple binary X-ray morphology. Nevertheless, we find that the cluster mass is still dominated by the two most massive clumps aligned north-south with a ~3:1 mass ratio (M_{200}=6.29_{-1.62}^{+2.24} x 10^{14} Msun and 1.98_{-0.74}^{+1.24} x 10^{14} Msun for the northern and southern clumps, respectively). The southern mass peak is ~2' offset toward the south with respect to the corresponding X-ray peak, which has a "bullet"-like morphology pointing south. Comparison of the current weak-lensing result with the X-ray, galaxy, and radio-relic suggests that perhaps the dominant mechanism responsible for the observed relic may be a high-speed collision of the two most massive subclusters, although the peculiarity of the morphology necessitates involvement of additional sub-clusters. Careful numerical simulations should follow in order to obtain more complete understanding of the merger scenario utilizing all existing observations.
  • Using overlapping fields with space-based Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and ground-based Subaru Telescope imaging we identify a population of blended galaxies that are blended to such a large degree that they are detected as single objects in the ground-based monochromatic imaging, which we label as 'ambiguous blends'. For deep imaging data, such as the depth targeted with the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST), the ambiguous blend population is both large ($\sim 14$%) and has a distribution of ellipticities that is different from that of unblended objects in a way that will likely be important for the weak lensing measurements. Most notably, for a limiting magnitude of $i \sim 27$ we find that ambiguous blending results in a ~14% increase in shear noise (or ~12% decrease in the effective projected number density of lensed galaxies; neff) due to 1) larger intrinsic ellipticity dispersion, 2) a scaling with the galaxy number density $N_{gal}$ that is shallower than 1/$\sqrt{N_{gal}}$. For the LSST Gold Sample ($i < 25.3$) there is a ~7% increase in shear noise (or ~7% decrease in $n_{eff}$). More importantly than these increases in the shear noise, we find that the ellipticity distribution of ambiguous blends has an RMS 13% larger than that of non-blended galaxies. Given the need of future weak lensing surveys to constrain the ellipticity distribution of galaxies to better than a percent in order to mitigate cosmic shear multiplicative biases, the different ellipticity distribution of ambiguous blends could be a dominant systematic if unaccounted for.
  • Merging galaxy clusters with radio relics provide rare insights to the merger dynamics as the relics are created by the violent merger process. We demonstrate one of the first uses of the properties of the radio relic to reduce the uncertainties of the dynamical variables and determine the 3D configuration of a cluster merger, ACT-CL J0102-4915, nicknamed El Gordo. From the double radio relic observation and the X-ray observation of a comet-like gas morphology induced by motion of the cool core, it is widely believed that El Gordo is observed shortly after the first core-passage of the subclusters. We employ a Monte Carlo simulation to investigate the three-dimensional (3D) configuration and dynamics of El Gordo. Using the polarization fraction of the radio relic, we constrain the estimate of the angle between the plane of the sky and the merger axis to be $\alpha = 21~{\rm degree} \pm^9_{11}$. We find the relative 3D merger speed of El Gordo to be $2400\pm^{400}_{200}~{\rm km}~{\rm s}^{-1}$ at pericenter. The two possible estimates of the time-since-pericenter are $0.46\pm^{0.09}_{0.16}$ Gyr and $0.91\pm^{0.22}_{0.39}$ Gyr for the outgoing and returning scenario respectively. We put our estimates of the time-since-pericenter into context by showing that if the time-averaged shock velocity is approximately equal to or smaller than the pericenter velocity of the corresponding subcluster in the center of mass frame, the two subclusters are more likely to be moving towards, rather than away, from each other, post apocenter. We compare and contrast the merger scenario of El Gordo with that of the Bullet Cluster, and show that this late-stage merging scenario explains why the southeast dark matter lensing peak of El Gordo is closer to the merger center than the southeast cool core.
  • We present first results from the third GRavitational lEnsing Accuracy Testing (GREAT3) challenge, the third in a sequence of challenges for testing methods of inferring weak gravitational lensing shear distortions from simulated galaxy images. GREAT3 was divided into experiments to test three specific questions, and included simulated space- and ground-based data with constant or cosmologically-varying shear fields. The simplest (control) experiment included parametric galaxies with a realistic distribution of signal-to-noise, size, and ellipticity, and a complex point spread function (PSF). The other experiments tested the additional impact of realistic galaxy morphology, multiple exposure imaging, and the uncertainty about a spatially-varying PSF; the last two questions will be explored in Paper II. The 24 participating teams competed to estimate lensing shears to within systematic error tolerances for upcoming Stage-IV dark energy surveys, making 1525 submissions overall. GREAT3 saw considerable variety and innovation in the types of methods applied. Several teams now meet or exceed the targets in many of the tests conducted (to within the statistical errors). We conclude that the presence of realistic galaxy morphology in simulations changes shear calibration biases by $\sim 1$ per cent for a wide range of methods. Other effects such as truncation biases due to finite galaxy postage stamps, and the impact of galaxy type as measured by the S\'{e}rsic index, are quantified for the first time. Our results generalize previous studies regarding sensitivities to galaxy size and signal-to-noise, and to PSF properties such as seeing and defocus. Almost all methods' results support the simple model in which additive shear biases depend linearly on PSF ellipticity.
  • Cluster mergers may play a fundamental role in the formation and evolution of cluster galaxies. Stroe et al. (2014) revealed unexpected over-densities of candidate H$\alpha$ emitters near the ~1 Mpc-wide shock fronts of the massive (~2x10$^{15}$M$_{\odot}$) "Sausage" merging cluster, CIZA J2242.8+5301. We used Keck/DEIMOS and WHT/AF2 to confirm 83 H$\alpha$ emitters in and around the merging cluster. We find that cluster star-forming galaxies in the hottest X-ray gas and/or in the cluster sub-cores (away from the shock fronts) show high [SII]6716/[SII]6761 and high [SII]6716/H$\alpha$, implying very low electron densities (<30x lower than all other star-forming galaxies outside the cluster) and significant contribution from supernovae, respectively. All cluster star-forming galaxies near the cluster centre show evidence of significant outflows (blueshifted Na D~200-300km/s), likely driven by supernovae. Strong outflows are also found for the cluster H$\alpha$ AGN. H$\alpha$ star-forming galaxies in the merging cluster follow the z~0 mass-metallicity relation, showing systematically higher metallicity (~0.15-0.2 dex) than H$\alpha$ emitters outside the cluster (projected R>2.5 Mpc). This suggests that the shock front may have triggered remaining metal-rich gas which galaxies were able to retain into forming stars. Our observations show that the merger of impressively massive (~10$^{15}$M$_\odot$) clusters can provide the conditions for significant star-formation and AGN activity, but, as we witness strong feedback by star-forming galaxies and AGN (and given how massive the merging cluster is), such sources will likely quench in a few 100 Myrs.
  • We present results from Chandra, XMM-Newton, and ROSAT observations of the Planck SZ-detected cluster A3716 (PLCKG345.40-39.34 - G345). We show that G345 is, in fact, two subclusters separated on the sky by 400 kpc. We measure the subclusters' gas temperatures (~ 2-3 keV), total (~ 1-2 x 10^14 solar masses) and gas (~ 1-2 x 10^13 solar masses) masses, gas mass fraction within r500, entropy profiles, and X-ray luminosities (~ 10^43 erg/s). Using the gas density and temperature profiles for both subclusters, we show that there is good (0.8 sigma) agreement between the expected Sunyaev-Zel'dovich signal predicted from the X-ray data and that measured from the Planck mission, and better agreement within 0.6 sigma when we re-computed the Planck value assuming a two component cluster model, with relative amplitudes fixed based on the X-ray data. Dynamical analysis shows that the two galaxy subclusters are very likely (> 97% probability) gravitationally bound, and in the most likely scenario, the subclusters will undergo core passage in 500 +- 200 Myr. The northern subcluster is centrally peaked and has a low entropy core, while the southern subcluster has a high central entropy. The high central entropy in the southern subcluster can be explained either by the mergers of several groups, as suggested by the presence of five giant ellipticals or by AGN energy injection, as suggested by the presence of a strong radio source in one of its massive elliptical galaxies, or by a combination of both processes.
  • Point estimators for the shearing of galaxy images induced by gravitational lensing involve a complex inverse problem in the presence of noise, pixelization, and model uncertainties. We present a probabilistic forward modeling approach to gravitational lensing inference that has the potential to mitigate the biased inferences in most common point estimators and is practical for upcoming lensing surveys. The first part of our statistical framework requires specification of a likelihood function for the pixel data in an imaging survey given parameterized models for the galaxies in the images. We derive the lensing shear posterior by marginalizing over all intrinsic galaxy properties that contribute to the pixel data (i.e., not limited to galaxy ellipticities) and learn the distributions for the intrinsic galaxy properties via hierarchical inference with a suitably flexible conditional probabilitiy distribution specification. We use importance sampling to separate the modeling of small imaging areas from the global shear inference, thereby rendering our algorithm computationally tractable for large surveys. With simple numerical examples we demonstrate the improvements in accuracy from our importance sampling approach, as well as the significance of the conditional distribution specification for the intrinsic galaxy properties when the data are generated from an unknown number of distinct galaxy populations with different morphological characteristics.
  • X-ray and radio observations of CIZA J2242.8+5301 suggest that it is a major cluster merger. Despite being well studied in the X-ray, and radio, little has been presented on the cluster structure and dynamics inferred from its galaxy population. We carried out a deep (i<25) broad band imaging survey of the system with Subaru SuprimeCam (g & i bands) and the Canada France Hawaii Telescope (r band) as well as a comprehensive spectroscopic survey of the cluster area (505 redshifts) using Keck DEIMOS. We use this data to perform a comprehensive galaxy/redshift analysis of the system, which is the first step to a proper understanding the geometry and dynamics of the merger, as well as using the merger to constrain self-interacting dark matter. We find that the system is dominated by two subclusters of comparable richness with a projected separation of 6.9'^{+0.7}_{-0.5} (1.3^{+0.13}_{-0.10} Mpc). We find that the north and south subclusters have similar redshifts of z=0.188 with a relative line-of-sight velocity difference of 69+/-190 km/s. We also find that north and south subclusters have velocity dispersions of 1160^{+100}_{-90} km/s and 1080^{+100}_{-70} km/s, respectively. These correspond to masses of 16.1^{+4.6}_{-3.3}x10^14 M_sun and 13.0^{+4.0}_{-2.5}x10^14 M_sun, respectively. While velocity dispersion measurements of merging clusters can be biased we believe the bias in this system to be minor due to the large projected separation and nearly plane-of-sky merger configuration. CIZA J2242.8+5301 is a relatively clean dissociative cluster merger with near 1:1 mass ratio, which makes it an ideal merger for studying merger associated physical phenomena.
  • Merging galaxy clusters have become one of the most important probes of dark matter, providing evidence for dark matter over modified gravity and even constraints on the dark matter self-interaction cross-section. To properly constrain the dark matter cross-section it is necessary to understand the dynamics of the merger, as the inferred cross-section is a function of both the velocity of the collision and the observed time since collision. While the best understanding of merging system dynamics comes from N-body simulations, these are computationally intensive and often explore only a limited volume of the merger phase space allowed by observed parameter uncertainty. Simple analytic models exist but the assumptions of these methods invalidate their results near the collision time, plus error propagation of the highly correlated merger parameters is unfeasible. To address these weaknesses I develop a Monte Carlo method to discern the properties of dissociative mergers and propagate the uncertainty of the measured cluster parameters in an accurate and Bayesian manner. I introduce this method, verify it against an existing hydrodynamic N-body simulation, and apply it to two known dissociative mergers: 1ES 0657-558 (Bullet Cluster) and DLSCL J0916.2+2951 (Musket Ball Cluster). I find that this method surpasses existing analytic models - providing accurate (10% level) dynamic parameter and uncertainty estimates throughout the merger history. This coupled with minimal required a priori information (subcluster mass, redshift, and projected separation) and relatively fast computation (~6 CPU hours) makes this method ideal for large samples of dissociative merging clusters.
  • We present DLSCL J0916.2+2951 (z=0.53), a newly discovered major cluster merger in which the collisional cluster gas has become dissociated from the collisionless galaxies and dark matter. We identified the cluster using optical and weak lensing observations as part of the Deep Lens Survey. Our follow-up observations with Keck, Subaru, Hubble Space Telescope, and Chandra show that the cluster is a dissociative merger and constrain the dark matter self-interaction cross-section {\sigma}_{DM}m_{DM}^{-1}\leq7 cm^2g^{-1}. The system is observed at least 0.7\pm0.2 Gyr since first pass-through, thus providing a picture of cluster mergers 2-5 times further progressed than similar systems observed to date. This improved temporal leverage has implications for our understanding of merging clusters and their impact on galaxy evolution.