• Recently we have witnessed the first multi-messenger detection of colliding neutron stars through Gravitational Waves (GWs) and Electromagnetic (EM) waves (GW170817), thanks to the joint efforts of LIGO/Virgo and Space/Ground-based telescopes. In this paper, we report on the RATIR followup observation strategies and show the results for the trigger G194575. This trigger is not of astrophysical interest; however, is of great interests to the robust design of a followup engine to explore large sky error regions. We discuss the development of an image-subtraction pipeline for the 6-color, optical/NIR imaging camera RATIR. Considering a two band ($i$ and $r$) campaign in the Fall of 2015, we find that the requirement of simultaneous detection in both bands leads to a factor $\sim$10 reduction in false alarm rate, which can be further reduced using additional bands. We also show that the performance of our proposed algorithm is robust to fluctuating observing conditions, maintaining a low false alarm rate with a modest decrease in system efficiency that can be overcome utilizing repeat visits. Expanding our pipeline to search for either optical or NIR detections (3 or more bands), considering separately the optical $riZ$ and NIR $YJH$ bands, should result in a false alarm rate $\approx 1\%$ and an efficiency $\approx 90\%$. RATIR's simultaneous optical/NIR observations are expected to yield about one candidate transient in the vast 100 $\mathrm{deg^2}$ LIGO error region for prioritized followup with larger aperture telescopes.
  • The merging neutron star gravitational wave event GW170817 has been observed throughout the entire electromagnetic spectrum from radio waves to $\gamma$-rays. The resulting energetics, variability, and light curves are shown to be consistent with GW170817 originating from the merger of two neutron stars, in all likelihood followed by the prompt gravitational collapse of the massive remnant. The available $\gamma$-ray, X-ray and radio data provide a clear probe for the nature of the relativistic ejecta and the non-thermal processes occurring within, while the ultraviolet, optical and infrared emission are shown to probe material torn during the merger and subsequently heated by the decay of freshly synthesized $r$-process material. The simplest hypothesis that the non-thermal emission is due to a low-luminosity short $\gamma$-ray burst (sGRB) seems to agree with the present data. While low luminosity sGRBs might be common, we show here that the collective prompt and multi-wavelength observations are also consistent with a typical, powerful sGRB seen off-axis. Detailed follow-up observations are thus essential before we can place stringent constraints on the nature of the relativistic ejecta in GW170817.
  • The merger of a binary neutron star system is suggested as the central engine of short gamma-ray bursts (sGRBs). For the merger process, simulations predict that magnetic field is amplified beyond magnetar field strength by Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities. With the Large Area Telescope (LAT), bursts have been detected that show a temporally extended component in coincidence with a short-lasting peak at the end of the prompt phase. We show that the presence of these LAT components in a sGRB could provide evidence of magnetic field amplification in the neutron star merger.
  • We report on the first open-use based Atacama Large Millimeter/submm Array (ALMA) 345-GHz observation for the late afterglow phase of GRB131030A. The ALMA observation constrained a deep limit at 17.1 d for the afterglow and host galaxy. We also identified a faint submillimeter source (ALMAJ2300-0522) near the GRB131030A position. The deep limit at 345 GHz and multifrequency observations obtained using {\it Swift} and RATIR yielded forward shock modeling with a two-dimensional relativistic hydrodynamic jet simulation and described X-ray excess in the afterglow. The excess was inconsistent with the synchrotron self-inverse Compton radiation from the forward shock. The host galaxy of GRB131030A and optical counterpart of ALMAJ2300-0522 were also identified in the SUBARU image. Based on the deep ALMA limit for the host galaxy, the 3-$\sigma$ upper limits of IR luminosity and the star formation rate (SFR) is estimated as $L_{IR}<1.11\times10^{11} L_{\odot}$ and SFR$<18.7$ ($M_{\odot}$~yr$^{-1}$), respectively. Although the separation angle from the burst location (3.5 arcsec) was rather large, ALMAJ2300-0522 may be one component of the GRB131030A host galaxy, according to previous host galaxy cases.
  • The most popular model for short gamma-ray bursts (sGRBs) involves the coalescence of binary neutron stars. Because the progenitor is actually hidden from view, we must consider under which circumstances such merging systems are capable of producing a successful sGRB. Soon after coalescence, winds are launched from the merger remnant. In this paper, we use realistic wind profiles derived from global merger simulations in order to investigate the interaction of sGRB jets with these winds using numerical simulations. We analyze the conditions for which these axisymmetric winds permit relativistic jets to breakout and produce a sGRB. We find that jets with luminosities comparable to those observed in sGRBs are only successful when their half-opening angles are below ~20{\deg}. This jet collimation mechanism leads to a simple physical interpretation of the luminosities and opening angles inferred for sGRBs. If wide, low luminosity jets are observed, they might be indicative of a different progenitor avenue such as the merger of a neutron star with a black hole. We also use the observed durations of sGRB to place constraints on the lifetime of the wind phase, which is determined by the time it takes the jet to breakout. In all cases we find that the derived limits argue against completely stable remnants for binary neutron star mergers that produce sGRBs.
  • The bright, short and hard GRB 090510 was detected by all instruments aboard Fermi and Swift satellites. The multiwavelength observations of this burst presented similar features with the Fermi-LAT-detected gamma-ray bursts. In the framework of the external shock model of early afterglow, a leptonic scenario that evolves in a homogeneous medium is proposed to revisit GRB 090510 and explain the multiwavelength light curve observations presented in this burst. These observations are consistent with the evolution of a jet before and after the jet break. The long-lasting LAT, X-ray and optical fluxes are explained in the synchrotron emission from the adiabatic forward shock. Synchrotron self-Compton emission from the reverse shock is consistent with the bright LAT peak provided that progenitor environment is entrained with strong magnetic fields. It could provide compelling evidence of magnetic field amplification in the neutron star merger.
  • DDOTI will be a wide-field robotic imager consisting of six 28-cm telescopes with prime focus CCDs mounted on a common equatorial mount. Each telescope will have a field of view of 12 square degrees, will have 2 arcsec pixels, and will reach a 10-sigma limiting magnitude in 60 seconds of r = 18.7 in dark time and r = 18.0 in bright time. The set of six will provide an instantaneous field of view of about 72 square degrees. DDOTI uses commercial components almost entirely. The first DDOTI will be installed at the Observatorio Astron\'omico Nacional in Sierra San Pedro Mart\'ir, Baja California, M\'exico in early 2017. The main science goals of DDOTI are the localization of the optical transients associated with GRBs detected by the GBM instrument on the Fermi satellite and with gravitational-wave transients. DDOTI will also be used for studies of AGN and YSO variability and to determine the occurrence of hot Jupiters. The principal advantage of DDOTI compared to other similar projects is cost: a single DDOTI installation costs only about US$500,000. This makes it possible to contemplate a global network of DDOTI installations. Such geographic diversity would give earlier access and a higher localization rate. We are actively exploring this option.
  • In this paper, we report observations of a peculiar Type Ia supernova iPTF13asv (a.k.a., SN2013cv) from the onset of the explosion to months after its peak. The early-phase spectra of iPTF13asv show absence of iron absorption, indicating that synthesized iron elements are confined to low-velocity regions of the ejecta, which, in turn, implies a stratified ejecta structure along the line of sight. Our analysis of iPTF13asv's light curves and spectra shows that it is an intermediate case between normal and super-Chandrasekhar events. On the one hand, its light curve shape (B-band $\Delta m_{15}=1.03\pm0.01$) and overall spectral features resemble those of normal Type Ia supernovae. On the other hand, similar to super-Chandrasekhar events, it shows large peak optical and UV luminosity ($M_B=-19.84\,\rm{mag}$, $M_{uvm2}=-15.5\,\rm{mag}$) a relatively low but almost constant \ion{Si}{2} velocities of about $10,000\,\rm{km}\,\rm{s}^{-1}$, and persistent carbon absorption in the spectra. We estimate a $^{56}$Ni mass of $0.81^{+0.10}_{-0.18}M_\odot$ and a total ejecta mass of $1.59^{+0.45}_{-0.12}M_\odot$. The large ejecta mass of iPTF13asv and its stratified ejecta structure together seemingly favor a double-degenerate origin.
  • The r-process nuclei are robustly synthesized in the material ejected during a neutron star binary merger (NSBM), as tidal torques transport angular momentum and energy through the outer Lagrange point in the form of a vast tidal tail. If NSBM are indeed solely responsible for the solar system r- process abundances, a galaxy like our own would require to host a few NSBM per million years, with each event ejecting, on average, about 5x10^{-2} M_sun of r-process material. Because the ejecta velocities in the tidal tail are significantly larger than in ordinary supernovae, NSBM deposit a comparable amount of energy into the interstellar medium (ISM). In contrast to extensive efforts studying spherical models for supernova remnant evolution, calculations quantifying the impact of NSBM ejecta in the ISM have been lacking. To better understand their evolution in a cosmological context, we perform a suite of three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations with optically-thin radiative cooling of isolated NSBM ejecta expanding in environments with conditions adopted from Milky Way-like galaxy simulations. Although the remnant morphology is highly complex at early times, the subsequent radiative evolution that results from thermal instability in atomic gas is remarkably similar to that of a standard supernova blast wave. This implies that sub-resolution supernova feedback models can be used in galaxy-scale simulations that are unable to resolve the key evolutionary phases of NSBM blast waves. Among other quantities, we examine the radius, time, mass and kinetic energy content of the NSBM remnant at shell formation as well as the momentum injected to the ISM. We find that the shell formation epoch is attained when the swept-up mass is about 10^3 M_sun, at this point the mass fraction of r-process material is drastically enhanced up to two orders of magnitude in relation to a solar metallicity ISM.
  • We conducted an 18 month long study of the weather conditions of the Vallecitos, a proposed site in Mexico to harbor the northern array of the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA). It is located in Sierra de San Pedro Martir (SPM) a few kilometers away from Observatorio Astron\'omico Nacional. The study is based on data collected by the ATMOSCOPE, a multi-sensor instrument measuring the weather and sky conditions, which was commissioned and built by the CTA Consortium. Additionally, we compare the weather conditions of the optical observatory at SPM to the Vallecitos regarding temperature, humidity, and wind distributions. It appears that the excellent conditions at the optical observatory benefit from the presence of microclimate established in the Vallecitos.
  • One of the most powerful gamma-ray bursts, GRB 130427A was swiftly detected from GeV $\gamma$-rays to optical wavelengths. In the GeV band, the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope observed the highest-energy photon ever recorded of 95 GeV, and a bright peak in the early phase followed by emission temporally extended for more than 20 hours. In the optical band, a bright flash with a magnitude of $7.03\pm 0.03$ in the time interval from 9.31 s to 19.31 s after the trigger was reported by RAPTOR in r-band. We study the origin of the GeV $\gamma$-ray emission, using the multiwavelength observation detected in X-ray and optical bands. The origin of the temporally extended LAT, X-ray and optical flux is naturally interpreted as synchrotron radiation and the 95-GeV photon and the integral flux upper limits placed by the HAWC observatory are consistent with synchrotron self-Compton from an adiabatic forward shock propagating into the stellar wind of its progenitor. The extreme LAT peak and the bright optical flash are explained through synchrotron self-Compton and synchrotron emission from the reverse shock, respectively, when the ejecta evolves in thick-shell regime and carries a significant magnetic field.
  • One of the most energetic gamma-ray bursts GRB 110731A, was observed from optical to GeV energy range by Fermi and Swift Observatories, and by the MOA and GROND optical telescopes. The multiwavelength observations over different epochs (from trigger time to more than 800 s) showed that the spectral energy distribution was better fitted by a wind afterglow model. We present a leptonic model based on an early afterglow that evolves in a stellar wind to describe the multiwavelength light curves observations. In particular, the origin of the LAT emission is explained through the superposition of synchrotron radiation from the forward shock and synchrotron self-Compton emission from the reverse shock. The bulk Lorentz factor required in this model is $\Gamma\simeq520$ and the result suggests that the ejecta must be magnetized.
  • We report here the discovery by the Intermediate Palomar Transient Factory (iPTF) of iPTF14yb, a luminous ($M_{r}\approx-27.8$ mag), cosmological (redshift 1.9733), rapidly fading optical transient. We demonstrate, based on probabilistic arguments and a comparison with the broader population, that iPTF14yb is the optical afterglow of the long-duration gamma-ray burst GRB 140226A. This marks the first unambiguous discovery of a GRB afterglow prior to (and thus entirely independent of) an associated high-energy trigger. We estimate the rate of iPTF14yb-like sources (i.e., cosmologically distant relativistic explosions) based on iPTF observations, inferring an all-sky value of $\Re_{\mathrm{rel}}=610$ yr$^{-1}$ (68% confidence interval of 110-2000 yr$^{-1}$). Our derived rate is consistent (within the large uncertainty) with the all-sky rate of on-axis GRBs derived by the Swift satellite. Finally, we briefly discuss the implications of the nondetection to date of bona fide "orphan" afterglows (i.e., those lacking detectable high-energy emission) on GRB beaming and the degree of baryon loading in these relativistic jets.
  • Investigations of elemental abundances in the ancient and most metal deficient stars are extremely important because they serve as tests of variable nucleosynthesis pathways and can provide critical inferences of the type of stars that lived and died before them. The presence of r-process elements in a handful of carbon-enhanced metal-poor (CEMP-r) stars, which are assumed to be closely connected to the chemical yield from the first stars, is hard to reconcile with standard neutron star mergers. Here we show that the production rate of dynamically assembled compact binaries in high-z nuclear star clusters can attain a sufficient high value to be a potential viable source of heavy r-process material in CEMP-r stars. The predicted frequency of such events in the early Galaxy, much lower than the frequency of Type II supernovae but with significantly higher mass ejected per event, can naturally lead to a high level of scatter of Eu as observed in CEMP-r stars.
  • A growing subset of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) show evidence for unexpected interaction with a dense circumstellar medium (SNe Ia-CSM). The precise nature of the progenitor, however, remains debated owing to spectral ambiguities arising from a strong contribution from the CSM interaction. Late-time spectra offer potential insight if the post-shock cold, dense shell becomes sufficiently thin and/or the ejecta begin to cross the reverse shock. To date, few high-quality spectra of this kind exist. Here we report on the late-time optical and infrared spectra of the SNe~Ia-CSM 2012ca and 2013dn. These SNe Ia-CSM spectra exhibit low [Fe III]/[Fe II] ratios and strong [Ca II] at late epochs. Such characteristics are reminiscent of the super-Chandrasekhar-mass (SC) candidate SN 2009dc, for which these features suggested a low-ionisation state due to high densities, although the broad Fe features admittedly show similarities to the blue "quasi-continuum" observed in some core-collapse SNe Ibn and IIn. Neither SN 2012ca nor any of the other SNe Ia-CSM show evidence for broad oxygen, carbon, or magnesium in their spectra. Similar to the interacting Type IIn SN 2005ip, a number of high-ionisation lines are identified in SN 2012ca, including [S III], [Ar III], [Ar X], [Fe VIII], [Fe X], and possibly [Fe XI]. The total bolometric energy output does not exceed 10^51 erg, but does require a large kinetic-to-radiative conversion efficiency. All of these observations taken together suggest that SNe Ia-CSM are more consistent with a thermonuclear explosion than a core-collapse event, although detailed radiative transfer models are certainly necessary to confirm these results.
  • We have obtained early-time photometry and spectroscopy of Supernova (SN) 2013df in NGC 4414. The SN is clearly of Type IIb, with notable similarities to SN 1993J. From its luminosity at secondary maximum light, it appears that less $^{56}$Ni ($\lesssim 0.06\ M_{\odot}$) was synthesized in the SN 2013df explosion than was the case for the SNe IIb 1993J, 2008ax, and 2011dh. Based on a comparison of the light curves, the SN 2013df progenitor must have been more extended in radius prior to explosion than the progenitor of SN 1993J. The total extinction for SN 2013df is estimated to be $A_V=0.30$ mag. The metallicity at the SN location is likely to be solar. We have conducted Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Target of Opportunity observations of the SN with the Wide Field Camera 3, and from a precise comparison of these new observations to archival HST observations of the host galaxy obtained 14 years prior to explosion, we have identified the progenitor of SN 2013df to be a yellow supergiant, somewhat hotter than a red supergiant progenitor for a normal Type II-Plateau SN. From its observed spectral energy distribution, assuming that the light is dominated by one star, the progenitor had effective temperature $T_{\rm eff} = 4250 \pm 100$ K and a bolometric luminosity $L_{\rm bol}=10^{4.94 \pm 0.06}\ L_{\odot}$. This leads to an effective radius $R_{\rm eff} = 545 \pm 65\ R_{\odot}$. The star likely had an initial mass in the range of 13 to 17 $M_{\odot}$; however, if it was a member of an interacting binary system, detailed modeling of the system is required to estimate this mass more accurately. The progenitor star of SN 2013df appears to have been relatively similar to the progenitor of SN 1993J.
  • The Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) SN 2000cx was one of the most peculiar transients ever discovered, with a rise to maximum brightness typical of a SN Ia, but a slower decline and a higher photospheric temperature. Thirteen years later SN 2013bh (aka iPTF13abc), a near identical twin, was discovered and we obtained optical and near-IR photometry and low-resolution optical spectroscopy from discovery until about 1 month past r-band maximum brightness. The spectra of both objects show iron-group elements (Co II, Ni II, Fe II, Fe III, and high-velocity features [HVFs] of Ti II), intermediate-mass elements (Si II, Si III, and S II), and separate normal velocity features (~12000 km/s) and HVFs (~24000 km/s) of Ca II. Persistent absorption from Fe III and Si III, along with the colour evolution, imply high blackbody temperatures for SNe 2013bh and 2000cx (~12000 K). Both objects lack narrow Na I D absorption and exploded in the outskirts of their hosts, indicating that the SN environments were relatively free of interstellar or circumstellar material and may imply that the progenitors came from a relatively old and low-metallicity stellar population. Models of SN 2000cx, seemingly applicable to SN 2013bh, imply the production of up to ~1 M_Sun of Ni-56 and (4.3-5.5)e-3 M_Sun of fast-moving Ca ejecta.
  • The collapse of massive rotating stellar cores and the associated accretion onto the newborn compact object is thought to power long gamma ray bursts (GRBs). The physical scale and dynamics of the accretion disk are initially set by the angular momentum distribution in the progenitor, and the physical conditions make neutrino emission the main cooling agent in the flow. The formation and evolution of structure in these disks is potentially very relevant for the energy release and its time variability, which ultimately imprint on the observed GRB properties. To begin to characterize these, taking into account the three dimensional nature of the problem, we have carried out an initial set of calculations of the collapse of rotating polytropic cores in three dimensions, making use of a pseudo-relativistic potential and a simplified cooling prescription. We focus on the effects of self gravity and cooling on the overall morphology and evolution of the flow for a given rotation rate in the context of the collapsar model. For the typical cooling times expected in such a scenario we observe the appearance of strong instabilities on the cooling time scale following disk formation, which modulate the properties of the flow. Such instabilities, and the interaction they produce between the disk and the central object lead to significant variability in the obtained mass accretion and energy loss rates, which will likely translate into variations in the power of the relativistic outflow that ultimately results in a GRB.
  • We present magnetohydrodynamic numerical simulations of the late post-supernova hypercritical accretion to understand its effect on the magnetic field of the new-born neutron star. We consider as an example the case of a magnetic field loop protruding from the star's surface. The accreting matter is assumed to be non magnetized and, due to the high accretion rate, matter pressure dominates over magnetic pressure. We find that an accretion envelope develops very rapidly and once it becomes convectively stable the magnetic field is easily buried and pushed into the newly forming neutron star crust. However, for low enough accretion rates the accretion envelope remains convective for an extended period of time and only partial submergence of the magnetic field occurs due to a residual field that is maintained at the interface between the forming crust and the convective envelope. In this latter case, the outcome should be a weakly magnetized neutron star with a likely complicated field geometry. In our simulations we find the transition from total to partial submergence to occur around dotM ~ 10 M_sun/yr. Back-diffusion of the submerged magnetic field toward the surface, and the resulting growth of the dipolar component, may result in a delayed switch-on of a pulsar on time-scales of centuries to millenia.
  • The possibility that long tidal tails formed during compact object mergers may power optical transients through the decay of freshly synthesized r-process material is investigated. Precise modeling of the merger dynamics allows for a realistic determination of the thermodynamic conditions in the ejected debris. The results of hydrodynamic and full nuclear network calculations are combined to calculate the resultant r-process abundances and the heating of the material by their decays. The subsequent homologous structure is mapped into a radiative transfer code to synthesize emergent model light curves and determine how their properties (variability and color evolution) depend on the mass ratio and orientation of the merging binary. The radiation emanating from the ejected debris, though less spectacular than a typical supernova, should be observable in transient surveys and we estimate the associated detection rates. The case for (or against) compact object mergers as the progenitors of short gamma-ray bursts can be tested if such electromagnetic transients are detected (or not) in coincidence with some bursts, although they may be obscured by on-axis afterglows.
  • While gas accretion onto some massive black holes (MBHs) at the centers of galaxies actively powers luminous emission, the vast majority of MBHs are considered dormant. Occasionally, a star passing too near a MBH is torn apart by gravitational forces, leading to a bright panchromatic tidal disruption flare (TDF). While the high-energy transient Swift J164449.3+573451 ("Sw 1644+57") initially displayed none of the theoretically anticipated (nor previously observed) TDF characteristics, we show that the observations (Levan et al. 2011) suggest a sudden accretion event onto a central MBH of mass ~10^6-10^7 solar masses. We find evidence for a mildly relativistic outflow, jet collimation, and a spectrum characterized by synchrotron and inverse Compton processes; this leads to a natural analogy of Sw 1644+57 with a smaller-scale blazar. The phenomenologically novel Sw 1644+57 thus connects the study of TDFs and active galaxies, opening a new vista on disk-jet interactions in BHs and magnetic field generation and transport in accretion systems.
  • The central engine of Gamma Ray Bursts is hidden from direct probing with photons mainly due to the high densities involved. Inferences on their properties are thus made from their cosmological setting, energetics, low-energy counterparts and variability. If GRBs are powered by hypercritical accretion onto compact objects, on small spatial scales the flow will exhibit fluctuations, which could in principle be reflected in the power output of the central engine and ultimately in the high energy prompt emission. Here we address this issue by characterizing the variability in neutrino cooled accretion flows through local shearing box simulations with magnetic fields, and then convolving them on a global scale with large scale dynamical simulations of accretion disks. The resulting signature is characteristic, and sensitive to the details of the cooling mechanism, providing in principle a discriminant for GRB central engine properties.
  • We present a detailed assessment of the dynamical pathways leading to the coalescence of compact objects in Globular Clusters (GCs) and Short Gamma-Ray Burst (SGRB) production. We consider primordial binaries, dynamically formed binaries (through tidal two-body and three-body exchange interactions) and direct impacts of compact objects (WD/NS/BH). We show that if the primordial binary fraction is small, close encounters dominate the production rate of coalescing compact systems. We find that the two dominant channels are the interaction of field NSs with dynamically formed binaries, and two-body encounters. We then estimate the redshift distribution and host galaxy demographics of SGRB progenitors, and find that GCs can provide a significant contribution to the overall observed rate. We have carried out hydrodynamical modeling of evolution of close stellar encounters with WD/NS/BH, and show that there is no problem in accounting for the energy budget of a typical SGRB. The particulars of each encounter are variable and lead to interesting diversity: the encounter characteristics are dependent on the impact parameter, in contrast to the merger scenario; the nature of the compact star itself can produce very different outcomes; the presence of tidal tails in which material falls back onto the central object at later times is a robust feature of these calculations, with the mass involved being larger than for binary mergers. It is thus possible to account generically in this scenario for a prompt episode of energy release, as well as for activity many dynamical time scales later (abridged).
  • The properties of a new-born neutron star, produced in a core-collapse supernova, can be strongly affected by the possible late fallback which occurs several hours after the explosion. This accretion occurs in the regime dominated by neutrino cooling, explored initially in this context by Chevalier (1989). Here we revisit this approach in a 1D spherically symmetric model and carry out numerical simulations in 2D in an accretion column onto a neutron star considering detailed microphysics, neutrino cooling and the presence of magnetic fields in ideal MHD. We compare our numerical results to the analytic solutions and explore how the purely hydrodynamical as well as the MHD solutions differ from them, and begin to explore how this may affect the appearance of the remnant as a typical radio pulsar.
  • We study the growth rates of massive black holes in the centres of galaxies from accretion of dark matter from their surrounding haloes. By considering only the accretion due to dark matter particles on orbits unbound to the central black hole, we obtain a firm lower limit to the resulting accretion rate. We find that a runaway accretion regime occurs on a timescale which depends on the three characteristic parameters of the problem: the initial mass of the black hole, and the volume density and velocity dispersion of the dark matter particles in its vicinity. An analytical treatment of the accretion rate yields results implying that for the largest black hole masses inferred from QSO studies ($>10^{9} M_{\odot}$), the runaway regime would be reached on time scales which are shorter than the lifetimes of the haloes in question for central dark matter densities in excess of $250 M_{\odot}$pc$^{-3}$. Since reaching runaway accretion would strongly distort the host dark matter halo, the inferences of QSO black holes in this mass range lead to an upper limit on the central dark matter densities of their host haloes of $\rho_{0} < 250 M_{\odot} $pc$^{-3}$. This limit scales inversely with the assumed central black hole mass. However, thinking of dark matter profiles as universal across galactic populations, as cosmological studies imply, we obtain a firm upper limit for the central density of dark matter in such structures.