• We reformulate the Corteel-Williams equations for the stationary state of the two parameter Asymmetric Simple Exclusion Process (TASEP) as a linear map $\mathcal{L}(\,\cdot\,)$, acting on a tensor algebra built from a rank two free module with basis $\{e_1,e_2\}$. From this formulation we construct a pair of sequences, $\{P_n(e_1)\}$ and $\{Q_m(e_2)\}$, of bi-orthogonal polynomials (BiOPS), that is, they satisfy $\mathcal{L}(P_n(e_1)\otimes Q_m(e_2))=\Lambda_n\delta_{n,m}$. The existence of the sequences arises from the determinant of a Pascal triangle like matrix of polynomials. The polynomials satisfy first order (uncoupled) recurrence relations. We show that the two first moments $\mathcal{L}(P_n\, e_1\, Q_m)$ and $\mathcal{L}(P_n\, e_2\, Q_m)$ give rise to a matrix representation of the ASEP diffusion algebra and hence provide an understanding of the origin of the matrix product Ansatz. The second moment $\mathcal{L}(P_n\, e_1 e_2\,Q_m )$ defines a tridiagonal matrix which makes the connection with Chebyshev-like orthogonal polynomials.
  • The NASA Exoplanet Exploration Program's SAG15 group has solicited, collected, and organized community input on high-level science questions that could be addressed with future direct imaging exoplanet missions and the type and quality of data answering these questions will require. Input was solicited through a variety of forums and the report draft was shared with the exoplanet community continuously during the period of the report development (Nov 2015 -- May 2017). The report benefitted from the input of over 50 exoplanet scientists and from multiple open-forum discussions at exoplanet and astrobiology meetings. The SAG15 team has identified three group of high-level questions, those that focus on the properties of planetary systems (Questions A1--A2), those that focus on the properties of individual planets (Questions B1--B4), and questions that relate to planetary processes (Questions C1--C4). The questions in categories A, B, and C require different target samples and often different observational approaches. For each questions we summarize the current body of knowledge, the available and future observational approaches that can directly or indirectly contribute to answering the question, and provide examples and general considerations for the target sample required.
  • Exoplanet science promises a continued rapid accumulation of new observations in the near future, energizing a drive to understand and interpret the forthcoming wealth of data to identify signs of life beyond our Solar System. The large statistics of exoplanet samples, combined with the ambiguity of our understanding of universal properties of life and its signatures, necessitate a quantitative framework for biosignature assessment Here, we introduce a Bayesian framework for guiding future directions in life detection, which permits the possibility of generalizing our search strategy beyond biosignatures of known life. The Bayesian methodology provides a language to define quantitatively the conditional probabilities and confidence levels of future life detection and, importantly, may constrain the prior probability of life with or without positive detection. We describe empirical and theoretical work necessary to place constraints on the relevant likelihoods, including those emerging from stellar and planetary context, the contingencies of evolutionary history and the universalities of physics and chemistry. We discuss how the Bayesian framework can guide our search strategies, including determining observational wavelengths or deciding between targeted searches or larger, lower resolution surveys. Our goal is to provide a quantitative framework not entrained to specific definitions of life or its signatures, which integrates the diverse disciplinary perspectives necessary to confidently detect alien life.
  • Repeated computed tomography (CT) scans are required in some clinical applications such as image-guided radiotherapy and follow-up observations over a time period. To optimize the radiation dose utility, a normal-dose (or full-dose) CT scan is often first performed to set up reference, followed by a series of low-dose scans. Using the previous normal-dose scan to improve follow-up low-dose scans reconstruction has drawn great interests recently, such as the previous normal-dose induced nonlocal means (ndiNLM) regularization method. However, one major concern with this method is that whether it would introduce false structures or miss true structures when the previous normal-dose image and current low-dose image have different structures (e.g., a tumor could be present, grow, shrink or absent in either image). This study aims to investigate the performance of the ndiNLM regularization method in the above mentioned situations. A patient with lung nodule for biopsy was recruited to this study. A normal-dose scan was acquired to set up biopsy operation, followed by a few low-dose scans during needle intervention toward the nodule. We used different slices to mimic different possible cases wherein the previous normal-dose image and current low-dose image have different structures. The experimental results characterize performance of our ndiNLM regularization method.