• Aims. We define a small and large chemical network which can be used for the quantitative simultaneous analysis of molecular emission from the near-IR to the submm. We revise reactions of excited molecular hydrogen, which are not included in UMIST, to provide a homogeneous database for future applications. Methods. We use the thermo-chemical disk modeling code ProDiMo and a standard T Tauri disk model to evaluate the impact of various chemical networks, reaction rate databases and sets of adsorption energies on a large sample of chemical species and emerging line fluxes from the near-IR to the submm wavelength range. Results. We find large differences in the masses and radial distribution of ice reservoirs when considering freeze-out on bare or polar ice coated grains. Most strongly the ammonia ice mass and the location of the snow line (water) change. As a consequence molecules associated to the ice lines such as N2H+ change their emitting region; none of the line fluxes in the sample considered here changes by more than 25% except CO isotopologues, CN and N2H+ lines. The three-body reaction N+H2+M plays a key role in the formation of water in the outer disk. Besides that, differences between the UMIST 2006 and 2012 database change line fluxes in the sample considered here by less than a factor 2 (a subset of low excitation CO and fine structure lines stays even within 25%); exceptions are OH, CN, HCN, HCO+ and N2H+ lines. However, different networks such as OSU and KIDA 2011 lead to pronounced differences in the chemistry inside 100 au and thus affect emission lines from high excitation CO, OH and CN lines. H2 is easily excited at the disk surface and state-to-state reactions enhance the abundance of CH+ and to a lesser extent HCO+. For sub-mm lines of HCN, N2H+ and HCO+, a more complex larger network is recommended. ABBREVIATED
  • Because of the very peculiar conditions of chemistry in many astrophysical gases (low densities, mostly low temperatures, kinetics-dominated chemical evolution), great efforts have been devoted to study molecular signatures and chemical evolution. While experiments are being performed in many laboratories, it appears that the efforts directed towards theoretical works are not as strong. This report deals with the present status of chemical physics/physical chemistry theory, for the qualitative and quantitative understanding of kinetics of molecular scattering, being it reactive or inelastic. By gathering several types of expertise, from applied mathematics to physical chemistry, dialog is made possible, as a step towards new and more adapted theoretical frameworks, capable of meeting the theoretical, methodological and numerical challenges of kinetics-dominated gas phase chemistry in astrophysical environments. A state of the art panorama is presented, alongside present-day strengths and shortcomings. However, coverage is not complete, being limited in this report to actual attendance of the workshop. Some paths towards relevant progress are proposed.
  • Context : The properties of the inner disks of bright Herbig AeBe stars have been studied with near infrared (NIR) interferometry and high resolution spectroscopy. The continuum and a few molecular gas species have been studied close to the central star; however, sensitivity problems limit direct information about the inner disks of the fainter T Tauri stars. Aims : Our aim is to measure some of the properties of the inner regions of disks surrounding southern T Tauri stars. Methods : We performed a survey with the PIONIER recombiner instrument at H-band of 21 T Tauri stars. The baselines used ranged from 11 m to 129 m, corresponding to a maximum resolution of 3mas (0.45 au at 150 pc). Results : Thirteen disks are resolved well and the visibility curves are fully sampled as a function of baseline in the range 45-130 m for these 13 objects. A simple qualitative examination of visibility profiles allows us to identify a rapid drop-off in the visibilities at short baselines in 8 resolved disks. This is indicative of a significant contribution from an extended contribution of light from the disk. We demonstrate that this component is compatible with scattered light, providing strong support to a prediction made by Pinte et al. (2008). The amplitude of the drop-off and the amount of dust thermal emission changes from source to source suggesting that each disk is different. A by-product of the survey is the identification of a new milli-arcsec separation binary: WW Cha. Spectroscopic and interferometric data of AK Sco have also been fitted with a binary and disk model. Conclusions : Visibility data are reproduced well when thermal emission and scattering form dust are fully considered. The inner radii measured are consistent with the expected dust sublimation radii. Modelling of AK Sco suggests a likely coplanarity between the disk and the binary's orbital plane
  • Investigating the evolution of protoplanetary disks is crucial for our understanding of star and planet formation. Several theoretical and observational studies have been performed in the last decades to advance this knowledge. FT Tauri is a young star in the Taurus star forming region that was included in a number of spectroscopic and photometric surveys. We investigate the properties of the star, the circumstellar disk, and the accretion and ejection processes and propose a consistent gas and dust model also as a reference for future observational studies. We performed a multi-wavelength data analysis to derive the basic stellar and disk properties, as well as mass accretion/outflow rate from TNG-Dolores, WHT-Liris, NOT-Notcam, Keck-Nirspec, and Herschel-Pacs spectra. From the literature, we compiled a complete Spectral Energy Distribution. We then performed detailed disk modeling using the MCFOST and ProDiMo codes. Multi-wavelengths spectroscopic and photometric measurements were compared with the reddened predictions of the codes in order to constrain the disk properties. This object can serve as a benchmark for primordial disks with significant mass accretion rate, high gas content and typical size.
  • At the distance of 99-116 pc, HD141569A is one of the nearest HerbigAe stars that is surrounded by a tenuous disk, probably in transition between a massive primordial disk and a debris disk. We observed the fine-structure lines of OI at 63 and 145 micron and the CII line at 157 micron with the PACS instrument onboard the Herschel Space Telescope as part of the open-time large programme GASPS. We complemented the atomic line observations with archival Spitzer spectroscopic and photometric continuum data, a ground-based VLT-VISIR image at 8.6 micron, and 12CO fundamental ro-vibrational and pure rotational J=3-2 observations. We simultaneously modeled the continuum emission and the line fluxes with the Monte Carlo radiative transfer code MCFOST and the thermo-chemical code ProDiMo to derive the disk gas- and dust properties assuming no dust settling. The models suggest that the oxygen lines are emitted from the inner disk around HD141569A, whereas the [CII] line emission is more extended. The CO submillimeter flux is emitted mostly by the outer disk. Simultaneous modeling of the photometric and line data using a realistic disk structure suggests a dust mass derived from grains with a radius smaller than 1 mm of 2.1E-7 MSun and from grains with a radius of up to 1 cm of 4.9E-6 MSun. We constrained the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) mass to be between 2E-11 and 1..4E-10 MSun assuming circumcircumcoronene (C150H30) as the representative PAH. The associated PAH abundance relative to hydrogen is lower than those found in the interstellar medium (3E-7) by two to three orders of magnitude. The disk around HD141569A is less massive in gas (2.5 to 4.9E-4 MSun or 67 to 164 MEarth) and has a flat opening angle (<10%). [abridged]
  • We present an extension of the code ProDiMo that allows for a modeling of processes pertinent to active galactic nuclei and to an ambient chemistry that is time dependent. We present a proof-of-concept and focus on a few astrophysically relevant species, e.g., H+, H2+ and H3+; C+ and N+; C and O; CO and H2O; OH+, H2O+ and H3O+; HCN and HCO+. We find that the freeze-out of water is strongly suppressed and that this affects the bulk of the oxygen and carbon chemistry occurring in AGN. The commonly used AGN tracer HCN/HCO+ is strongly time-dependent, with ratios that vary over orders of magnitude for times longer than 10^4 years. Through ALMA observations this ratio can be used to probe how the narrow-line region evolves under large fluctuations in the SMBH accretion rate. Strong evolutionary trends, on time scales of 10^4-10^8 years, are also found in species such as H3O+, CO, and H2O. These reflect, respectively, time dependent effects in the ionization balance, the transient nature of the production of molecular gas, and the freeze-out/sublimation of water.
  • The carbon monoxide rovibrational emission from discs around Herbig Ae stars and T Tauri stars with strong ultraviolet emissions suggests that fluorescence pumping from the ground X1 Sigma+ to the electronic A1 Pi state of CO should be taken into account in disc models. We implemented a CO model molecule that includes up to 50 rotational levels within nine vibrational levels for the ground and A excited states in the radiative photochemical code ProDiMo. We took CO collisions with hydrogen molecules, hydrogen atoms, helium, and electrons into account. We estimated the missing collision rates using standard scaling laws and discussed their limitations. UV fluorescence and IR pumping impact on the population of ro-vibrational v > 1 levels. The v = 1 rotational levels are populated at rotational temperatures between the radiation temperature around 4.6 micron and the gas kinetic temperature. The UV pumping efficiency increases with decreasing disc mass. The consequence is that the vibrational temperatures, which measure the relative populations between the vibrational levels, are higher than the disc gas kinetic temperatures (suprathermal population). Rotational temperatures from fundamental transitions derived using optically thick 12CO lines do not reflect the gas kinetic temperature. CO pure rotational levels with energies lower than 1000 K are populated in LTE but are sensitive to a number of vibrational levels included in the model. The 12CO pure rotational lines are highly optically thick for transition from levels up to Eupper=2000 K. (abridged)
  • Most of the mass in protoplanetary disks is in the form of gas. The study of the gas and its diagnostics is of fundamental importance in order to achieve a detailed description of the thermal and chemical structure of the disk. The radiation from the central star (from optical to X-ray wavelengths) and viscous accretion are the main source of energy and dominates the disk physics and chemistry in its early stages. This is the environment in which the first phases of planet formation will proceed. We investigate how stellar and disk parameters impact the fine-structure cooling lines [NeII], [ArII], [OI], [CII] and H2O rotational lines in the disk. These lines are potentially powerful diagnostics of the disk structure and their modelling permits a thorough interpretation of the observations carried out with instrumental facilities such as Spitzer and Herschel. Following Aresu et al. (2011), we computed a grid of 240 disk models, in which the X-ray luminosity, UV-excess luminosity, minimum dust grain size, dust size distribution power law and surface density distribution power law, are systematically varied. We solve self-consistently for the disk vertical hydrostatic structure in every model and apply detailed line radiative transfer to calculate line fluxes and profiles for a series of well known mid- and far-infrared cooling lines. The [OI] 63 micron line flux increases with increasing FUV luminosity when Lx < 1e30 erg/s, and with increasing X-ray luminosity when LX > 1e30 erg/s. [CII] 157 micron is mainly driven by FUV luminosity via C+ production, X-rays affect the line flux to a lesser extent. [NeII] 12.8 micron correlates with X-rays; the line profile emitted from the disk atmosphere shows a double-peaked component, caused by emission in the static disk atmosphere, next to a high velocity double-peaked component, caused by emission in the very inner rim. (abridged)
  • Cosmic rays (CRs) control the thermal, ionization and chemical state of the dense H_2 gas regions that otherwise remain shielded from far-UV and optical stellar radiation propagating through the dusty ISM of galaxies. It is in such CR-dominated regions (CRDRs) rather than Photon-dominated regions (PDRs) of H_2 clouds where the star formation initial conditions are set, making CRs the ultimate star-formation feedback factor in galaxies, able to operate even in their most deeply dust-enshrouded environments. CR-controlled star formation initial conditions naturally set the stage for a near-invariant stellar Initial Mass Function (IMF) in galaxies as long as their average CR energy density U_{CR} permeating their molecular ISM remains within a factor of ~10 of its Galactic value. Nevertheless, in the extreme environments of the compact starbursts found in merging galaxies, where U_{CR}\sim(few)x10^{3}U_{CR,Gal}, CRs dramatically alter the initial conditions of star formation. In the resulting extreme CRDRs H_2 cloud fragmentation will produce far fewer low mass (<8 M_{sol}) stars, yielding a top-heavy stellar IMF. This will be a generic feature of CR-controlled star-formation initial conditions, lending a physical base for a bimodal IMF during galaxy formation, with a top-heavy one for compact merger-induced starbursts, and an ordinary IMF preserved for star formation in isolated gas-rich disks. In this scheme the integrated galactic IMFs (IGIMF) are expected to be strong functions of the star formation history of galaxies.
  • We examine in detail the recent proposal that extreme Cosmic-Ray-Dominated-Regions (CRDRs) characterize the ISM of galaxies during events of high-density star formation, fundamentally altering its initial conditions (Papadopoulos 2010). Solving the coupled chemical and thermal state equations for dense UV-shielded gas reveals that the large cosmic ray energy densities in such systems (U_{CR} (few)x(10^3-10^4) U_{CR,Gal}) will indeed raise the minimum temperature of this phase (where the initial conditions of star formation are set) from ~10K (as in the Milky Way) to (50-100)K. Moreover in such extreme CRDRs the gas temperature remains fully decoupled from that of the dust, with T_{kin} >> T_{dust}, even at high densities (n(H_2)~10^5--10^6 cm^{-3}), quite unlike CRDRs in the Milky Way where T_k T_{dust} when n(H_2) >= 10^5 cm^{-3}. These dramatically different star formation initial conditions will: a) boost the Jeans mass of UV-shielded gas regions by factors of ~10--100 with respect to those in quiescent or less extreme star forming systems, and b) "erase" the so-called inflection point of the effective equation of state (EOS) of molecular gas. Both these effects occur across the entire density range of typical molecular clouds, and may represent {\it a new paradigm for all high-density star formation in the Universe}, with cosmic rays as the key driving mechanism, operating efficiently even in the high dust extinction environments of extreme starbursts...
  • We study the hydrostatic density structure of the inner disc rim around HerbigAe stars using the thermo-chemical hydrostatic code ProDiMo. We compare the Spectral Energy Distributions (SEDs) and images from our hydrostatic disc models to that from prescribed density structure discs. The 2D continuum radiative transfer in ProDiMo includes isotropic scattering. The dust temperature is set by the condition of radiative equilibrium. In the thermal-decoupled case the gas temperature is governed by the balance between various heating and cooling processes. The gas and dust interact thermally via photoelectrons, radiatively, and via gas accommodation on grain surfaces. As a result, the gas is much hotter than in the thermo-coupled case, where the gas and dust temperatures are equal, reaching a few thousands K in the upper disc layers and making the inner rim higher. A physically motivated density drop at the inner radius ("soft-edge") results in rounded inner rims, which appear ring-like in near-infrared images. The combination of lower gravity pull and hot gas beyond ~1 AU results in a disc atmosphere that reaches a height over radius ratio z/r of 0.1 while this ratio is 0.2 only in the thermo-coupled case. This puffed-up disc atmosphere intercepts larger amount of stellar radiation, which translates into enhanced continuum emission in the 3- 30 micron wavelength region from hotter grains at ~500 K. We also consider the effect of disc mass and grain size distribution on the SEDs self-consistently feeding those quantities back into the gas temperature, chemistry, and hydrostatic equilibrium computation.
  • We have combined the thermo-chemical disc code ProDiMo with the Monte Carlo radiative transfer code MCFOST to calculate a grid of ~300000 circumstellar disc models, systematically varying 11 stellar, disc and dust parameters including the total disc mass, several disc shape parameters and the dust-to-gas ratio. For each model, dust continuum and line radiative transfer calculations are carried out for 29 far IR, sub-mm and mm lines of [OI], [CII], 12CO and o/p-H2O under 5 inclinations. The grid allows to study the influence of the input parameters on the observables, to make statistical predictions for different types of circumstellar discs, and to find systematic trends and correlations between the parameters, the continuum fluxes, and the line fluxes. The model grid, comprising the calculated disc temperatures and chemical structures, the computed SEDs, line fluxes and profiles, will be used in particular for the data interpretation of the Herschel open time key programme GASPS. The calculated line fluxes show a strong dependence on the assumed UV excess of the central star, and on the disc flaring. The fraction of models predicting [OI] and [CII] fine-structure lines fluxes above Herschel/PACS and Spica/SAFARI detection limits are calculated as function of disc mass. The possibility of deriving the disc gas mass from line observations is discussed.
  • The origin of Earth oceans is controversial. Earth could have acquired its water either from hydrated silicates (wet Earth scenario) or from comets (dry Earth scenario). [HDO]/[H2O] ratios are used to discriminate between the scenarios. High [HDO]/[H2O] ratios are found in Earth oceans. These high ratios are often attributed to the release of deuterium enriched cometary water ice, which was formed at low gas and dust temperatures. Observations do not show high [HDO]/[H2O] in interstellar ices. We investigate the possible formation of high [HDO]/[H2O] ratios in dense (nH> 1E6 cm^{-3}) and warm gas (T=100-1000 K) by gas-phase photochemistry in the absence of grain surface chemistry. We derive analytical solutions, taking into account the major neutral-neutral reactions for gases at T>100 K. The chemical network is dominated by photodissociation and neutral-neutral reactions. Despite the high gas temperature, deuterium fractionation occurs because of the difference in activation energy between deuteration enrichment and the back reactions. The analytical solutions were confirmed by the time-dependent chemical results in a 1E-3 MSun disc around a typical TTauri star using the photochemical code ProDiMo. The ProDiMo code includes frequency-dependent 2D dust-continuum radiative transfer, detailed non-LTE gas heating and cooling, and hydrostatic calculation of the disc structure. Both analytical and time-dependent models predict high [HDO]/[H2O] ratios in the terrestrial planet forming region (< 3 AU) of circumstellar discs. Therefore the [HDO]/[H2O] ratio may not be an unique criterion to discriminate between the different origins of water on Earth.
  • The spatial origin and detectability of rotational H2O emission lines from Herbig Ae type protoplanetary disks beyond 70 micron is discussed. We use the recently developed disk code ProDiMo to calculate the thermo-chemical structure of a Herbig Ae type disk and apply the non-LTE line radiative transfer code Ratran to predict water line profiles and intensity maps. The model shows three spatially distinct regions in the disk where water concentrations are high, related to different chemical pathways to form the water: (1) a big water reservoir in the deep midplane behind the inner rim, (2) a belt of cold water around the distant icy midplane beyond the snow-line r>20AU, and (3) a layer of irradiated hot water at high altitudes z/r=0.1...0.3, extending from about 1AU to 30AU, where the kinetic gas temperature ranges from 200K to 1500K. Although region 3 contains only little amounts of water vapour (~3x10^-5 M_Earth), we find this warm layer to be almost entirely responsible for the rotational water emission lines, execpt for the 3 lowest excitation lines. Thus, Herschel will probe first and foremost the conditions and radial extension of region 3, where water is predominantly formed via neutral-neutral reactions and the gas is thermally decoupled from the dust T_gas>T_dust. The observations do not allow for a determination of the snow-line, because the snow-line truncates the radial extension of region 1, whereas the lines originate from region 3. Different line transfer approximations (LTE, escape probability, Monte Carlo) are discussed. A non-LTE treatment is required in most cases, and the results obtained with the escape probability method are found to underestimate the Monte Carlo results by 2%...45%.
  • This paper introduces a new disk code, called ProDiMo, to calculate the thermo-chemical structure of protoplanetary disks and to interpret gas emission lines from UV to sub-mm. We combine frequency-dependent 2D dust continuum radiative transfer, kinetic gas-phase and UV photo-chemistry, ice formation, and detailed non-LTE heating & cooling balance with the consistent calculation of the hydrostatic disk structure. We include FeII and CO ro-vibrational line heating/cooling relevant for the high-density gas close to the star, and apply a modified escape probability treatment. The models are characterized by a high degree of consistency between the various physical, chemical and radiative processes, where the mutual feedbacks are solved iteratively. In application to a T Tauri disk extending from 0.5AU to 500AU, the models are featured by a puffed-up inner rim and show that the dense, shielded and cold midplane (z/r<0.1, Tg~Td) is surrounded by a layer of hot (5000K) and thin (10^7 to 10^8 cm^-3) atomic gas which extends radially to about 10AU, and vertically up to z/r~0.5. This layer is predominantly heated by the stellar UV (e.g. PAH-heating) and cools via FeII semi-forbidden and OI 630nm optical line emission. The dust grains in this "halo" scatter the star light back onto the disk which impacts the photo-chemistry. The more distant regions are characterized by a cooler flaring structure. Beyond 100AU, Tgas decouples from Tdust even in the midplane and reaches values of about Tg~2Td. Our models show that the gas energy balance is the key to understand the vertical disk structure. Models calculated with the assumption Tg=Td show a much flatter disk structure.
  • This article summarizes a Splinter Session at the Cool Stars XV conference in St. Andrews with 3 review and 4 contributed talks. The speakers have discussed various approaches to understand the structure and evolution of the gas component in protoplanetary disks. These ranged from observational spectroscopy in the UV, infrared and millimeter, through to chemical and hydrodynamical models. The focus was on disks around low-mass stars, ranging from classical T Tauri stars to transitional disks and debris disks. Emphasis was put on water and organic molecules, the relation to planet formation, and the formation of holes and gaps in the inner regions.
  • High-quality K-band spectra of point sources, deeply embedded in massive star-forming regions, have revealed a population of 20 young massive stars showing no photospheric absorption lines, but only emission lines. The K-band spectra exhibit one or more features commonly associated with massive Young Stellar Objects surrounded by circumstellar material: a very red color (J-K) = 2, CO bandhead emission, hydrogen emission lines (sometimes doubly peaked), and FeII and/or MgII emission lines. The CO emission comes from a relatively dense (~10^10 cm^(-3)) and hot (T ~ 2000-5000 K) region, sufficiently shielded from the intense UV radiation field of the young massive star. Modeling of the CO-first overtone emission shows that the CO gas is located within 5 AU of the star. The hydrogen emission is produced in an ionized medium exposed to UV radiation. The best geometrical configuration is a dense and neutral circumstellar disk causing the CO bandhead emission, and an ionized upper layer where the hydrogen lines are produced. We argue that the circumstellar disk is likely a remnant of the accretion via a circumstellar disk.
  • The results of single-dish observations of low- and high-J transitions of selected molecules from protoplanetary disks around two TTauri stars (LkCa15 and TWHya) and two HerbigAe stars (HD163296 and MWC480) are reported. Simple molecules such as CO, 13CO, HCO+, CN and HCN are detected. Several lines of H2CO are found toward the TTauri star LkCa15 but not in other objects. No CH3OH has been detected down to abundances of 10E-9 - 10E-8 with respect to H2. SO and CS lines have been searched for without success. Line ratios indicate that the molecular emission arises from dense 10E6 - 10E8 cm-3 and moderately warm (T ~ 20-40K) intermediate height regions of the disk atmosphere, in accordance with predictions from models of the chemistry in disks. The abundances of most species are lower than in the envelope around the solar-mass protostar IRAS 16293-2422. Freeze-out and photodissociation are likely causes of the depletion. DCO+ is detected toward TWHya, but not in other objects. The high inferred DCO+/HCO+ ratio of ~0.035 is consistent with models of the deuterium fractionation in disks which include strong depletion of CO. The inferred ionization fraction in the intermediate height regions as deduced from HCO+ is at least 10E-11 - 10E-10, comparable to that derived for the midplane from recent H2D+ observations. (abridged abstract)
  • Emission from the $2_{12}-1_{11}$ line of H$_2$CO has been detected and marginally resolved toward LkCa15 by the Nobeyama Millimeter Array. The column density of H$_2$CO is higher than that observed in DM Tau and than predicted by theoretical models of disk chemistry; also the line-intensity profile is less centrally peaked than that for CO. A similar behavior is observed in other organic gaseous molecules in the LkCa 15 disk.
  • We have carried out an in-depth study of the peripheral region of the molecular cloud L1204/S140, where the far ultraviolet radiation and the density are relatively low. Our observations test theories of photon-dominated regions (PDRs) in a regime that has been little explored. CII 158 micron and OI 63 micron lines are detected by ISO at all 16 positions along a 1-dimensional cut in right ascension. Emission from molecular hydrogen rotational transitions, at 28 and 17 micron, was also detected at several positions. The CII, OI, and molecular hydrogen intensities along the cut show much less spatial variation than do the rotational lines of CO and other CO isotopes. The average CII and OI intensities and their ratio are consistent with models of PDRs with low FUV radiation (Go) and density. The best-fitting model has Go about 15 and density, n about 1000 per cubic cm. Standard PDR models underpredict the intensity in the H2 rotational lines by up to an order of magnitude. This problem has also been seen in bright PDRs and attributed to factors, such as geometry and gas-grain drift, that should be much less important in the regime studied here. The fact that we see the same problem in our data suggests that more fundamental solutions, such as higher H2 formation rates, are needed. Also, in this regime of low density and small line width, the OI line is sensitive to the radiative transfer and geometry. Using the ionization structure of the models, a quantitative analysis of timescales for ambipolar diffusion in the peripheral regions of the S140 cloud is consistent with a theory of photoionization-regulated star formation. Observations of CII in other galaxies differ both from those of high Go PDRs in our galaxy and from the low Go regions we have studied. ~
  • We present the first detection of the low-lying pure rotational emission lines of H2 from circumstellar disks around T~Tauri stars, using the Short Wavelength Spectrometer on the Infrared Space Observatory. These lines provide a direct measure of the total amount of warm molecular gas in disks. The J=2->0 S(0) line at 28.218 mum and the J=3->1 S(1) line at 17.035 mum have been observed toward the double binary system GG Tau. Together with limits on the J=5->3 S(3) and J=7->5 S(5) lines, the data suggest the presence of gas at T_kin=110+-10 K with a mass of (3.6+-2.0)x10^-3 M_sol (3sigma). This amounts to ~3% of the total gas + dust mass of the circumbinary disk as imaged by millimeter interferometry, but is larger than the estimated mass of the circumstellar disk(s). Possible origins for the warm gas seen in H2 are discussed in terms of photon and wind-shock heating mechanisms of the circumbinary material, and comparisons with model calculations are made.