• We use high-resolution continuum images obtained at 870microns with the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) to probe the surface density of star-formation in z~2 galaxies and study the different physical properties between galaxies within and above the star-formation main sequence of galaxies. This sample of eight star-forming galaxies at z~2 selected among the most massive Herschel galaxies in the GOODS-South field is supplemented with eleven galaxies from the public data of the 1.3 mm survey of the Hubble Ultra-Deep Field. ALMA reveals systematically dense concentrations of dusty star-formation close to the center of the stellar component of the galaxies. We identify two different starburst regimes: (i) the classical population of starbursts located above the SFR-M* main sequence, with enhanced gas fractions and short depletion times and (ii) a sub-population of galaxies located within the scatter of the main sequence that experience compact star formation with depletion timescales typical of starbursts of ~150 Myr. In both starburst populations, the far infrared and UV are distributed in distinct regions and dust-corrected star formation rates estimated using UV-optical-NIR data alone underestimate the total star formation rate. Starbursts hidden in the main sequence show instead the lowest gas fractions of our sample and could represent the last stage of star-formation before they become passive. Being Herschel-selected, these main sequence galaxies are located in the high-mass end of the main sequence, hence we do not know whether these "starbursts hidden in the main sequence" also exist below 10^11 Msun. Active galactic nuclei are found to be ubiquitous in these compact starbursts, suggesting that the triggering mechanism also feeds the central black hole or that the active nucleus triggers star formation.
  • Energetic feedback by Active Galactic Nuclei (AGNs) plays an important evolutionary role in the regulation of star formation (SF) on galactic scales. However, the effects of this feedback as a function of redshift and galaxy properties such as mass, environment and cold gas content remain poorly understood. The broad frequency coverage (1 to 116 GHz), high sensitivity (up to ten times higher than the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array), and superb angular resolution (maximum baselines of at least a few hundred km) of the proposed next generation Very Large Array (ngVLA) are uniquely poised to revolutionize our understanding of AGNs and their role in galaxy evolution. Here, we provide an overview of the science related to AGN feedback that will be possible in the ngVLA era and present new continuum ngVLA imaging simulations of resolved radio jets spanning a wide range of intrinsic extents. We also consider key computational challenges and discuss exciting opportunities for multi-wavelength synergy with other next-generation instruments, such as the Square Kilometer Array and the James Webb Space Telescope. The unique combination of high-resolution, large collecting area, and wide frequency range will enable significant advancements in our understanding of the effects of jet-driven feedback on sub-galactic scales, particularly for sources with extents of a few pc to a few kpc such as young and/or lower-power radio AGNs, AGNs hosted by low-mass galaxies, radio jets that are interacting strongly with the interstellar medium of the host galaxy, and AGNs at high redshift.
  • We present morphological properties of dusty star-forming galaxies at z=1-3 determined with high-resolution (FWHM~0"19) Atacama Large Milllimeter/submilimeter Array (ALMA) 1-mm band maps of our ASAGAO survey covering a 26-arcmin^2 area in GOODS-S and the ALMA archive. The present sample consists of 42 ALMA sources with a wide rest-frame far-infrared (FIR) luminosity L_FIR range of ~10^11-10^13 Lo. To obtain an average rest-frame FIR profile, we perform individual measurements and careful stacking of the ALMA sources using the $uv$-visibility method that includes positional-uncertainty and smoothing-effect evaluations through Monte-Carlo simulations. We find that the dusty star-forming galaxies have the average FIR-wavelength Sersic index and effective radius of $n$_FIR=1.2+/-0.2 and R_e,FIR=1.0-1.5 kpc, respectively, additionally with a point source at the center, indicative of the existence of AGN. The average FIR profile agrees with a morphology of an exponential-disk clearly distinguished from a spheroidal profile (Sersic index of 4), and supports a positive correlation of the FIR size-luminosity relation. We also examine the rest-frame optical Sersic index $n$_opt and effective radius $R$_e,opt with the deep Hubble Space Telescope (HST) images. Interestingly, we obtain $n$_opt=0.9+/-0.3 (~ $n$_FIR) and $R$_e,opt=3.2+/-0.6 kpc ($>R$_e,FIR), suggesting that the FIR-emitting disk is embedded within a larger stellar disk. The rest-frame UV and FIR data of HST and ALMA provide us a radial surface density profile of the total star-formation rate (SFR), where the FIR SFR dominates over the UV SFR at the center. Under the simple assumption of a constant SFR, a compact stellar distribution found in z~1-2 compact quiescent galaxies (cQGs) is well reproduced, while a spheroidal stellar morphology of cQGs ($n$_opt=4) cannot, suggestive of other important mechanisms such as dynamical dissipation.
  • We analyze the properties of a multiply-imaged Lyman-alpha (Lya) emitter at z=5.75 identified through SHARDS Frontier Fields intermediate-band imaging of the Hubble Frontier Fields (HFF) cluster Abell 370. The source, A370-L57, has low intrinsic luminosity (M_UV~-16.5), steep UV spectral index (\beta=-2.4+/-0.1), and extreme rest-frame equivalent width of Lya (EW(Lya)=420+180-120 \AA). Two different gravitational lens models predict high magnification (\mu~10--16) for the two detected counter-images, separated by 7", while a predicted third counter-image (\mu~3--4) is undetected. We find differences of ~50% in magnification between the two lens models, quantifying our current systematic uncertainties. Integral field spectroscopy of A370-L57 with MUSE shows a narrow (FWHM=204+/-10 km/s) and asymmetric Lya profile with an integrated luminosity L(Lya)~10^42 erg/s. The morphology in the HST bands comprises a compact clump (r_e<100 pc) that dominates the Lya and continuum emission and several fainter clumps at projected distances <1 kpc that coincide with an extension of the Lya emission in the SHARDS F823W17 and MUSE observations. The latter could be part of the same galaxy or an interacting companion. We find no evidence of contribution from AGN to the Lya emission. Fitting of the spectral energy distribution with stellar population models favors a very young (t<10 Myr), low mass (M*~10^6.5 Msun), and metal poor (Z<4x10^-3) stellar population. Its modest star formation rate (SFR~1.0 Msun/yr) implies high specific SFR (sSFR~2.5x10^-7 yr^-1) and SFR density (Sigma_SFR ~ 7-35 Msun/yr/kpc^2). The properties of A370-L57 make it a good representative of the population of galaxies responsible for cosmic reionization.
  • We report the discovery of a mysterious giant $H_{\alpha}$ blob that is $\sim 8$ kpc away from the main MaNGA target 1-24145, one component of a dry galaxy merger, identified in the first-year SDSS-IV MaNGA data. The size of the $H_{\alpha}$ blob is $\sim$ 3-4 kpc in radius, and the $H_{\alpha}$ distribution is centrally concentrated. However, there is no optical continuum counterpart in deep broadband images reaching $\sim$26.9 mag arcsec$^{-2}$ in surface brightness. We estimate that the masses of ionized and cold gases are $3.3 \times 10^{5}$ $\rm M_{\odot}$ and $< 1.3 \times 10^{9}$ $\rm M_{\odot}$, respectively. The emission-line ratios indicate that the $H_{\alpha}$ blob is photoionized by a combination of massive young stars and AGN. Furthermore, the ionization line ratio decreases from MaNGA 1-24145 to the $H_{\alpha}$ blob, suggesting that the primary ionizing source may come from MaNGA 1-24145, likely a low-activity AGN. Possible explanations of this $H_{\alpha}$ blob include AGN outflow, the gas remnant being tidally or ram-pressure stripped from MaNGA 1-24145, or an extremely low surface brightness (LSB) galaxy. However, the stripping scenario is less favoured according to galaxy merger simulations and the morphology of the $H_{\alpha}$ blob. With the current data, we can not distinguish whether this $H_{\alpha}$ blob is ejected gas due to a past AGN outburst, or a special category of `ultra-diffuse galaxy' (UDG) interacting with MaNGA 1-24145 that further induces the gas inflow to fuel the AGN in MaNGA 1-24145.
  • The nature of warm, ionized gas outside of galaxies may illuminate several key galaxy evolutionary processes. A serendipitous observation by the MaNGA survey has revealed a large, asymmetric H$\alpha$ complex with no optical counterpart that extends $\approx8"$ ($\approx6.3$ kpc) beyond the effective radius of a dusty, starbursting galaxy. This H$\alpha$ extension is approximately three times the effective radius of the host galaxy and displays a tail-like morphology. We analyze its gas-phase metallicities, gaseous kinematics, and emission-line ratios, and discuss whether this H$\alpha$ extension could be diffuse ionized gas, a gas accretion event, or something else. We find that this warm, ionized gas structure is most consistent with gas accretion through recycled wind material, which could be an important process that regulates the low-mass end of the galaxy stellar mass function.
  • We present stacking analyses on our ALMA deep 1.1 mm imaging in the SXDF using 1.6 {\mu}m and 3.6 {\mu}m selected galaxies in the CANDELS WFC3 catalog. We detect a stacked flux of ~0.03-0.05 mJy, corresponding to LIR < 10^11 Lsun and a star formation rate (SFR) of ~ 15 Msun/yr at z = 2. We find that galaxies brighter in the rest-frame near-infrared tend to be also brighter at 1.1 mm, and galaxies fainter than m[3.6um] = 23 do not produce detectable 1.1 mm emission. This suggests a correlation between stellar mass and SFR, but outliers to this correlation are also observed, suggesting strongly boosted star formation or extremely large extinction. We also find tendencies that redder galaxies and galaxies at higher redshifts are brighter at 1.1 mm. Our field contains z ~ 2.5 H-alpha emitters and a bright single-dish source. However, we do not find evidence of bias in our results caused by the bright source. By combining the fluxes of sources detected by ALMA and fluxes of faint sources detected with stacking, we recover a 1.1 mm surface brightness of up to 20.3 +/- 1.2 Jy/deg, comparable to the extragalactic background light measured by COBE. Based on the fractions of optically faint sources in our and previous ALMA studies and the COBE measurements, we find that approximately half of the cosmic star formation may be obscured by dust and missed by deep optical surveys, Much deeper and wider ALMA imaging is therefore needed to better constrain the obscured cosmic star formation history.
  • We present a multi-wavelength analysis of five submillimeter sources (S_1.1mm = 0.54-2.02 mJy) that were detected during our 1.1-mm-deep continuum survey in the SXDF-UDS-CANDELS field (2 arcmin^2, 1sigma = 0.055 mJy beam^-1) using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA). The two brightest sources correspond to a known single-dish (AzTEC) selected bright submillimeter galaxy (SMG), whereas the remaining three are faint SMGs newly uncovered by ALMA. If we exclude the two brightest sources, the contribution of the ALMA-detected faint SMGs to the infrared extragalactic background light is estimated to be ~ 4.1^{+5.4}_{-3.0} Jy deg^{-2}, which corresponds to ~ 16^{+22}_{-12}% of the infrared extragalactic background light. This suggests that their contribution to the infrared extragalactic background light is as large as that of bright SMGs. We identified multi-wavelength counterparts of the five ALMA sources. One of the sources (SXDF-ALMA3) is extremely faint in the optical to near-infrared region despite its infrared luminosity (L_IR ~ 1e12 L_sun or SFR ~ 100 M_sun yr^{-1}). By fitting the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) at the optical-to-near-infrared wavelengths of the remaining four ALMA sources, we obtained the photometric redshifts (z_photo) and stellar masses (M_*): z_photo ~ 1.3-2.5, M_* ~ (3.5-9.5)e10 M_sun. We also derived their star formation rates (SFRs) and specific SFRs (sSFRs) as ~ 30-200 M_sun yr^{-1} and ~ 0.8-2 Gyr^{-1}, respectively. These values imply that they are main-sequence star-forming galaxies.
  • Quiescent galaxies with little or no ongoing star formation dominate the galaxy population above $M_{*}\sim 2 \times 10^{10}~M_{\odot}$, where their numbers have increased by a factor of $\sim25$ since $z\sim2$. Once star formation is initially shut down, perhaps during the quasar phase of rapid accretion onto a supermassive black hole, an unknown mechanism must remove or heat subsequently accreted gas from stellar mass loss or mergers that would otherwise cool to form stars. Energy output from a black hole accreting at a low rate has been proposed, but observational evidence for this in the form of expanding hot gas shells is indirect and limited to radio galaxies at the centers of clusters, which are too rare to explain the vast majority of the quiescent population. Here we report bisymmetric emission features co-aligned with strong ionized gas velocity gradients from which we infer the presence of centrally-driven winds in typical quiescent galaxies that host low-luminosity active nuclei. These galaxies are surprisingly common, accounting for as much as $10\%$ of the population at $M_* \sim 2 \times 10^{10}~ M_{\odot}$. In a prototypical example, we calculate that the energy input from the galaxy's low-level active nucleus is capable of driving the observed wind, which contains sufficient mechanical energy to heat ambient, cooler gas (also detected) and thereby suppress star formation.
  • We present first results from the SXDF-ALMA 1.5 arcmin^2 deep survey at 1.1 mm using Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA). The map reaches a 1sigma depth of 55 uJy/beam and covers 12 Halpha-selected star-forming galaxies at z = 2.19 or z=2.53. We have detected continuum emission from three of our Halpha-selected sample, including one compact star-forming galaxy with high stellar surface density, NB2315-07. They are all red in the rest-frame optical and have stellar masses of log (M*/Msun)>10.9 whereas the other blue, main-sequence galaxies with log(M*/Msun)=10.0-10.8 are exceedingly faint, <290 uJy (2sigma upper limit). We also find the 1.1 mm-brightest galaxy, NB2315-02, to be associated with a compact (R_e=0.7+-0.1 kpc), dusty star-forming component. Given high gas fraction (44^{+20}_{-8}% or 37^{+25}_{-3}%) and high star formation rate surface density (126^{+27}_{-30} Msun yr^{-1}kpc^{-2}), the concentrated starburst can within less than 50^{+12}_{-11} Myr build up a stellar surface density matching that of massive compact galaxies at z~2, provided at least 19+-3% of the total gas is converted into stars in the galaxy centre. On the other hand, NB2315-07, which already has such a high stellar surface density core, shows a gas fraction (23+-8%) and is located in the lower envelope of the star formation main-sequence. This compact less star-forming galaxy is likely to be in an intermediate phase between compact dusty star-forming and quiescent galaxies.
  • The final assembly of terrestrial planets occurs via massive collisions, which can launch copious clouds of dust that are warmed by the star and glow in the infrared. We report the real-time detection of a debris-producing impact in the terrestrial planet zone around a 35-million year-old solar analog star. We observed a substantial brightening of the debris disk at 3-5 {\mu}m, followed by a decay over a year, with quasi-periodic modulations of the disk flux. The behavior is consistent with the occurrence of a violent impact that produced vapor out of which a thick cloud of silicate spherules condensed that were ground into dust by collisions. These results demonstrate how the time domain can become a new dimension for the study of terrestrial planet formation.
  • Luminous debris disks of warm dust in the terrestrial planet zones around solar-like stars are recently found to vary, indicative of ongoing large-scale collisions of rocky objects. We use Spitzer 3.6 and 4.5 {\mu}m time-series observations in 2012 and 2013 (extended to 2014 in one case) to monitor 5 more debris disks with unusually high fractional luminosities ("extreme debris disk"), including P1121 in the open cluster M47 (80 Myr), HD 15407A in the AB Dor moving group (80 Myr), HD 23514 in the Pleiades (120 Myr), HD 145263 in the Upper Sco Association (10 Myr), and the field star BD+20 307 (>1 Gyr). Together with the published results for ID8 in NGC 2547 (35 Myr), this makes the first systematic time-domain investigation of planetary impacts outside the solar system. Significant variations with timescales shorter than a year are detected in five out of the six extreme debris disks we have monitored. However, different systems show diverse sets of characteristics in the time domain, including long-term decay or growth, disk temperature variations, and possible periodicity.
  • Debris disks with extremely large infrared excesses (fractional luminosities $> 10^{-2}$) are rare. Those with ages between 30 and 130 Myr are of interest because their evolution has progressed well beyond that of protoplanetary disks (which dissipate with a timescale of order 3 Myr), yet they represent a period when dynamical models suggest that terrestrial planet building may still be progressing through large, violent collisions that could yield large amounts of debris and large infrared excesses. For example, our Moon was formed through a violent collision of two large proto-planets during this age range. We report two disks around the solar-like stars ID8 and HD 23514 in this age range where the 24 {\mu}m infrared excesses vary on timescales of a few years, even though the stars are not variable in the optical. Variations this rapid are difficult to understand if the debris is produced by collisional cascades, as it is for most debris disks. It is possible that the debris in these two systems arises in part from condensates from silicate-rich vapor produced in a series of violent collisions among relatively large bodies. If their evolution is rapid, the rate of detection of extreme excesses would indicate that major collisions may be relatively common in this age range.
  • We show that the star-forming regions in high-redshift luminous and ultraluminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs and ULIRGs) and submillimeter galaxies (SMGs) have similar physical scales to those in local normal star-forming galaxies. To first order, their higher infrared (IR) luminosities result from higher luminosity surface density. We also find a good correlation between the IR luminosity and IR luminosity surface density in starburst galaxies across over five orders of magnitude of IR luminosity from local normal galaxies to z ~ 2 SMGs. The intensely star-forming regions of local ULIRGs are significantly smaller than those in their high-redshift counterparts and hence diverge significantly from this correlation, indicating that the ULIRGs found locally are a different population from the high-redshift ULIRGs and SMGs. Based on this relationship, we suggest that luminosity surface density should serve as a more accurate indicator for the IR emitting environment, and hence the observable properties, of star-forming galaxies than their IR luminosity. We demonstrate this approach by showing that ULIRGs at z ~ 1 and a lensed galaxy at z ~ 2.5 exhibit aromatic features agreeing with local LIRGs that are an order of magnitude less luminous, but have similar IR luminosity surface density. A consequence of this relationship is that the aromatic emission strength in star-forming galaxies will appear to increase at z > 1 for a given IR luminosity compared to their local counterparts.
  • We present the 24 micron rest-frame luminosity function (LF) of star-forming galaxies in the redshift range 0.0 < z < 0.6 constructed from 4047 spectroscopic redshifts from the AGN and Galaxy Evolution Survey of 24 micron selected sources in the Bootes field of the NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey. This sample provides the best available combination of large area (9 deg^2), depth, and statistically complete spectroscopic observations, allowing us to probe the evolution of the 24 micron LF of galaxies at low and intermediate redshifts while minimizing the effects of cosmic variance. In order to use the observed 24 micron luminosity as a tracer for star formation, active galactic nuclei (AGNs) that could contribute significantly at 24 micron are identified and excluded from our star-forming galaxy sample based on their mid-IR spectral energy distributions or the detection of X-ray emission. The evolution of the 24 micron LF of star-forming galaxies for redshifts of z < 0.65 is consistent with a pure luminosity evolution where the characteristic 24 micron luminosity evolves as (1+z)^(3.8+/-0.3). We extend our evolutionary study to encompass 0.0 < z < 1.2 by combining our data with that of the Far-Infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey. Over this entire redshift range the evolution of the characteristic 24 micron luminosity is described by a slightly shallower power law of (1+z)^(3.4+/-0.2). We find a local star formation rate density of (1.09+/-0.21) x 10^-2 Msun/yr/Mpc^-3, and that it evolves as (1+z)^(3.5+/-0.2) over 0.0 < z < 1.2. These estimates are in good agreement with the rates using optical and UV fluxes corrected for the effects of intrinsic extinction in the observed sources. This agreement confirms that star formation at z <~ 1.2 is robustly traced by 24 micron observations and that it largely occurs in obscured regions of galaxies. (Abridged)