• Random number generation is an enabling technology for fields as varied as Monte Carlo simulations and quantum information science. An important application is a secure quantum key distribution (QKD) system; here, we propose and demonstrate an approach to random number generation that satisfies the specific requirements for QKD. In our scheme, vacuum fluctuations of the electromagnetic-field inside a laser cavity are sampled in a discrete manner in time and amplified by injecting current pulses into the laser. Random numbers can be obtained by interfering the laser pulses with another independent laser operating at the same frequency. Using only off-the-shelf opto-electronics and fibre-optics components at 1.5 $\mu$m wavelength, we experimentally demonstrate the generation of high-quality random bits at a rate of up to 1.5 GHz. Our results show the potential of the new scheme for practical information processing applications.
  • Large-scale quantum networks will employ telecommunication-wavelength photons to exchange quantum information between remote measurement, storage, and processing nodes via fibre-optic channels. Quantum memories compatible with telecommunication-wavelength photons are a key element towards building such a quantum network. Here, we demonstrate the storage and retrieval of heralded 1532 nm-wavelength photons using a solid-state waveguide quantum memory. The heralded photons are derived from a photon-pair source that is based on parametric down-conversion, and our quantum memory is based on a 6 GHz-bandwidth atomic frequency comb prepared using an inhomogeneously broadened absorption line of a cryogenically-cooled erbium-doped lithium niobate waveguide. Using persistent spectral hole burning under varying magnetic fields, we determine that the memory is enabled by population transfer into niobium and lithium nuclear spin levels. Despite limited storage time and efficiency, our demonstration represents an important step towards quantum networks that operate in the telecommunication band and the development of on-chip quantum technology using industry-standard crystals.
  • Nanostructured rare-earth-ion doped materials are increasingly being investigated for on-chip implementations of quantum information processing protocols as well as commercial applications such as fluorescent lighting. However, achieving high-quality and optimized materials at the nanoscale is still challenging. Here we present a detailed study of the restriction of phonon processes in the transition from bulk crystals to small ($\le$ 40 nm) nanocrystals by observing the relaxation dynamics between crystal-field levels of Tb$^{3+}$:Y$_3$Al$_5$O$_{12}$. We find that population relaxation dynamics are modified as the particle size is reduced, consistent with our simulations of inhibited relaxation through a modified vibrational density of states and hence modified phonon emission. However, our experiments also indicate that non-radiative processes not driven by phonons are also present in the smaller particles, causing transitions and rapid thermalization between the levels on a timescale of $<$100 ns.
  • We characterize the 795 nm $^3$H$_6$ to $^3$H$_4$ transition of Tm$^{3+}$ in a Ti$^{4+}$:LiNbO$_{3}$ waveguide at temperatures as low as 800 mK. Coherence and hyperfine population lifetimes -- up to 117 $\mu$s and 2.5 hours, respectively -- exceed those at 3 K at least ten-fold, and are equivalent to those observed in a bulk Tm$^{3+}$:LiNbO$_{3}$ crystal under similar conditions. We also find a transition dipole moment that is equivalent to that of the bulk. Finally, we prepare a 0.5 GHz-bandwidth atomic frequency comb of finesse $>$2 on a vanishing background. These results demonstrate the suitability of rare-earth-doped waveguides created using industry-standard Ti-indiffusion in LiNbO$_3$ for on-chip quantum applications.
  • We experimentally realize a measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution (MDI-QKD) system based on cost-effective and commercially available hardware such as distributed feedback (DFB) lasers and field-programmable gate arrays (FPGA) that enable time-bin qubit preparation and time-tagging, and active feedback systems that allow for compensation of time-varying properties of photons after transmission through deployed fibre. We examine the performance of our system, and conclude that its design does not compromise performance. Our demonstration paves the way for MDI-QKD-based quantum networks in star-type topology that extend over more than 100 km distance.
  • Optical coherence lifetimes and decoherence processes in erbium-doped lithium niobate (Er$^{3+}$:LiNbO$_3$) crystalline powders are investigated for materials that underwent different mechanical and thermal treatments. Several complimentary methods are used to assess the coherence lifetimes for these highly scattering media. Direct intensity or heterodyne detection of two-pulse photon echo techniques was employed for samples with longer coherence lifetimes and larger signal strengths, while time-delayed optical free induction decays were found to work well for shorter coherence lifetimes and weaker signal strengths. Spectral hole burning techniques were also used to characterize samples with very rapid dephasing processes. The results on powders are compared to the properties of a bulk crystal, with observed differences explained by the random orientation of the particles in the powders combined with new decoherence mechanisms introduced by the powder fabrication. Modeling of the coherence decay shows that paramagnetic materials such as Er$^{3+}$:LiNbO$_3$ that have highly anisotropic interactions with an applied magnetic field can still exhibit long coherence lifetimes and relatively simple decay shapes even for a powder of randomly oriented particles. We find that coherence properties degrade rapidly from mechanical treatment when grinding powders from bulk samples, leading to the appearance of amorphous-like behavior and a broadening of up to three orders of magnitude for the homogeneous linewidth even when low-energy grinding methods are employed. Annealing at high temperatures can improve the properties in some samples, with homogeneous linewidths reduced to less than 10 kHz, approaching the bulk crystal linewidth of 3 kHz under the same experimental conditions.
  • Understanding decoherence in cryogenically-cooled rare-earth-ion doped glass fibers is of fundamental interest and a prerequisite for applications of these material in quantum information applications. Here we study the coherence properties in a weakly doped erbium silica glass fiber motivated by our recent observation of efficient and long-lived Zeeman sublevel storage in this material and by its potential for applications at telecommunication wavelengths. We analyze photon echo decays as well as the potential mechanisms of spectral diffusion that can be caused by coupling with dynamic disorder modes that are characteristic for glassy hosts, and by the magnetic dipole-dipole interactions between $Er^{3+}$ ions. We also investigate the effective linewidth as a function of magnetic field, temperature and time, and then present a model that describes these experimental observations. We highlight that the operating conditions (0.6 K and 0.05 T) at which we previously observed efficient spectral hole burning coincide with those for narrow linewidths (1 MHz) { an important property for applications that has not been reported before for a rare-earth-ion doped glass.
  • We compare the standard 50%-efficient single beam splitter method for Bell-state measurement to a proposed 75%-efficient auxiliary-photon-enhanced scheme [W. P. Grice, Phys. Rev. A 84, 042331 (2011)] in light of realistic conditions. The two schemes are compared with consideration for high input state photon loss, auxiliary state photon loss, detector inefficiency and coupling loss, detector dark counts, and non-number-resolving detectors. We also analyze the two schemes when multiplexed arrays of non-number-resolving detectors are used. Furthermore, we explore the possibility of utilizing spontaneous parametric down-conversion as the auxiliary photon pair source required by the enhanced scheme. In these different cases, we determine the bounds on the detector parameters at which the enhanced scheme becomes superior to the standard scheme and describe the impact of the different imperfections on measurement success rate and discrimination fidelity. This is done using a combination of numeric and analytic techniques. For many of the cases discussed, the size of the Hilbert space and the number of measurement outcomes can be very large, which makes direct numerical solutions computationally costly. To alleviate this problem, all of our numerical computations are performed using pure states. This requires tracking the loss modes until measurement and treating dark counts as variations on measurement outcomes rather than modifications to the state itself. In addition, we provide approximate analytic expressions that illustrate the effect of different imperfections on the Bell-state analyzer quality.
  • Anisotropy of the quadratic Zeeman effect for the $^3{\rm H}_6 \rightarrow \, ^3{\rm H}_4$ transition at 793 nm wavelength in $^{169}$Tm$^{3+}$-doped Y$_3$Al$_5$O$_{12}$ is studied, revealing shifts ranging from near zero up to + 4.69 GHz/T$^2$ for ions in magnetically inequivalent sites. This large range of shifts is used to spectrally resolve different subsets of ions and study nuclear spin relaxation as a function of temperature, magnetic field strength, and orientation in a site-selective manner. A rapid decrease in spin lifetime is found at large magnetic fields, revealing the weak contribution of direct-phonon absorption and emission to the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate. We furthermore confirm theoretical predictions for the phonon coupling strength, finding much smaller values than those estimated in the limited number of past studies of thulium in similar crystals. Finally, we observe a significant -- and unexpected -- magnetic field dependence of the two-phonon Orbach spin relaxation process at higher field strengths, which we explain through changes in the electronic energy-level splitting arising from the quadratic Zeeman effect.
  • Nano-structuring impurity-doped crystals affects the phonon density of states and thereby modifies the atomic dynamics induced by interaction with phonons. We propose the use of nano-structured materials in the form of powders or phononic bandgap crystals to enable or improve persistent spectral hole-burning and coherence for inhomogeneously broadened absorption lines in rare-earth-ion-doped crystals. This is crucial for applications such as ultra-precise radio-frequency spectrum analyzers and optical quantum memories. As an example, we discuss how phonon engineering can enable spectral hole burning in erbium-doped materials operating in the convenient telecommunication band, and present simulations for density of states of nano-sized powders and phononic crystals for the case of Y2SiO5, a widely-used material in current quantum memory research.
  • If a photon interacts with a member of an entangled photon pair via a so-called Bell-state measurement (BSM), its state is teleported over principally arbitrary distances onto the second member of the pair. Starting in 1997, this puzzling prediction of quantum mechanics has been demonstrated many times; however, with one very recent exception, only the photon that received the teleported state, if any, travelled far while the photons partaking in the BSM were always measured closely to where they were created. Here, using the Calgary fibre network, we report quantum teleportation from a telecommunication-wavelength photon, interacting with another telecommunication photon after both have travelled over several kilometres in bee-line, onto a photon at 795~nm wavelength. This improves the distance over which teleportation takes place from 818~m to 6.2~km. Our demonstration establishes an important requirement for quantum repeater-based communications and constitutes a milestone on the path to a global quantum Internet.
  • High-quality rare-earth-ion (REI) doped materials are a prerequisite for many applications such as quantum memories, ultra-high-resolution optical spectrum analyzers and information processing. Compared to bulk materials, REI doped powders offer low-cost fabrication and a greater range of accessible material systems. Here we show that crystal properties, such as nuclear spin lifetime, are strongly affected by mechanical treatment, and that spectral hole burning can serve as a sensitive method to characterize the quality of REI doped powders. We focus on the specific case of thulium doped Y$_2$Al$_5$O$_{12}$ (Tm:YAG). Different methods for obtaining the powders are compared and the influence of annealing on the spectroscopic quality of powders is investigated on a few examples. We conclude that annealing can reverse some detrimental effects of powder fabrication and, in certain cases, the properties of the bulk material can be reached. Our results may be applicable to other impurities and other crystals, including color centers in nano-structured diamond.
  • Long-lived population storage in optically pumped levels of rare-earth ions doped into solids, referred to as persistent spectral hole burning, is of significant fundamental and technological interest. However, the demonstration of deep and persistent holes in rare-earth ion doped amorphous hosts, e.g. glasses, has remained an open challenge since many decades -- a fact that motivates our work towards a better understanding of the interaction between impurities and vibrational modes in glasses. Here we report the first observation and detailed characterization of such holes in an erbium-doped silica glass fiber cooled to below 1 K. We demonstrate population storage in electronic Zeeman-sublevels of the erbium ground state with lifetimes up to 30 seconds and 80\% spin polarization. In addition to its fundamental aspect, our investigation reveals a potential technological application of rare-earth ion doped amorphous materials, including at telecommunication wavelength.
  • Processing and distributing quantum information using photons through fibre-optic or free-space links is essential for building future quantum networks. The scalability needed for such networks can be achieved by employing photonic quantum states that are multiplexed into time and/or frequency, and light-matter interfaces that are able to store and process such states with large time-bandwidth product and multimode capacities. Despite important progress in developing such devices, the demonstration of these capabilities using non-classical light remains challenging. Employing the atomic frequency comb quantum memory protocol in a cryogenically cooled erbium-doped optical fibre, we report the quantum storage of heralded single photons at a telecom-wavelength (1.53 {\mu}m) with a time-bandwidth product approaching 800. Furthermore we demonstrate frequency-multimode storage as well as memory-based spectral-temporal photon manipulation. Notably, our demonstrations rely on fully integrated quantum technologies operating at telecommunication wavelengths, i.e. a fibre-pigtailed nonlinear waveguide for the generation of heralded single photons, an erbium-doped fibre for photon storage and manipulation, and fibre interfaced superconducting nanowire devices for efficient single photon detection. With improved storage efficiency, our light-matter interface may become a useful tool in future quantum networks.
  • Non-destructive detection of photonic qubits is an enabling technology for quantum information processing and quantum communication. For practical applications such as quantum repeaters and networks, it is desirable to implement such detection in a way that allows some form of multiplexing as well as easy integration with other components such as solid-state quantum memories. Here we propose an approach to non-destructive photonic qubit detection that promises to have all the mentioned features. Mediated by an impurity-doped crystal, a signal photon in an arbitrary time-bin qubit state modulates the phase of an intense probe pulse that is stored during the interaction. Using a thulium-doped waveguide in LiNbO$_3$, we perform a proof-of-principle experiment with macroscopic signal pulses, demonstrating the expected cross-phase modulation as well as the ability to preserve the coherence between temporal modes. Our findings open the path to a new key component of quantum photonics based on rare-earth-ion doped crystals.
  • We analyze an entanglement-based quantum key distribution (QKD) architecture that uses a linear chain of quantum repeaters employing photon-pair sources, spectral-multiplexing, linear-optic Bell-state measurements, multi-mode quantum memories and classical-only error correction. Assuming perfect sources, we find an exact expression for the secret-key rate, and an analytical description of how errors propagate through the repeater chain, as a function of various loss and noise parameters of the devices. We show via an explicit analytical calculation, which separately addresses the effects of the principle non-idealities, that this scheme achieves a secret key rate that surpasses the TGW bound---a recently-found fundamental limit to the rate-vs.-loss scaling achievable by any QKD protocol over a direct optical link---thereby providing one of the first rigorous proofs of the efficacy of a repeater protocol. We explicitly calculate the end-to-end shared noisy quantum state generated by the repeater chain, which could be useful for analyzing the performance of other non-QKD quantum protocols that require establishing long-distance entanglement. We evaluate that shared state's fidelity and the achievable entanglement distillation rate, as a function of the number of repeater nodes, total range, and various loss and noise parameters of the system. We extend our theoretical analysis to encompass sources with non-zero two-pair-emission probability, using an efficient exact numerical evaluation of the quantum state propagation and measurements. We expect our results to spur formal rate-loss analysis of other repeater protocols, and also to provide useful abstractions to seed analyses of quantum networks of complex topologies.
  • The academic research into entanglement nicely illustrates the interplay between fundamental science and applications, and the need to foster both aspects to advance either one. For instance, the possibility to distribute entangled photons over tens or even hundreds of kilometers is fascinating because it confirms the quantum predictions over large distances, while quantum theory is often presented to apply to the very small (see Figure 1). On the other hand, entanglement enables quantum key distribution (QKD) [1]. This most advanced application of quantum information processing allows one to distribute cryptographic keys in a provably secure manner. For this, one merely has to measure the two halves of an entangled pair of photons. Surprisingly, and being of both fundamental and practical interest, the use of entanglement removes even the necessity for trusting most equipment used for the measurements [5]. Furthermore, entanglement serves as a resource for quantum teleportation (see Figure 2) [1]. In turn, this provides a tool for extending quantum key distribution to arbitrarily large distances and building large-scale networks that connect future quantum computers and atomic clocks [6]. In the following, we describe the counter-intuitive properties of entangled particles as well as a few recent experiments that address fundamental and applied aspects of quantum teleportation. While a lot of work is being done using different quantum systems, including trapped ions, color centers in diamond, quantum dots, and superconducting circuits, we will restrict ourselves to experiments involving photons due to their suitability for building future quantum networks.
  • Photon-based quantum information processing promises new technologies including optical quantum computing, quantum cryptography, and distributed quantum networks. Polarization-encoded photons at telecommunication wavelengths provide a compelling platform for practical realization of these technologies. However, despite important success towards building elementary components compatible with this platform, including sources of entangled photons, efficient single photon detectors, and on-chip quantum circuits, a missing element has been atomic quantum memory that directly allows for reversible mapping of quantum states encoded in the polarization degree of a telecom-wavelength photon. Here we demonstrate the quantum storage and retrieval of polarization states of heralded single-photons at telecom-wavelength by implementing the atomic frequency comb protocol in an ensemble of erbium atoms doped into an optical fiber. Despite remaining limitations in our proof-of-principle demonstration such as small storage efficiency and storage time, our broadband light-matter interface reveals the potential for use in future quantum information processing.
  • We report entanglement swapping with time-bin entangled photon pairs, each constituted of a 795 nm photon and a 1533 nm photon, that are created via spontaneous parametric down conversion in a non-linear crystal. After projecting the two 1533 nm photons onto a Bell state, entanglement between the two 795 nm photons is verified by means of quantum state tomography. As an important feature, the wavelength and bandwidth of the 795 nm photons is compatible with Tm:LiNbO3-based quantum memories, making our experiment an important step towards the realization of a quantum repeater.
  • Conventional wisdom suggests that realistic quantum repeaters will require quasi-deterministic sources of entangled photon pairs. In contrast, we here study a quantum repeater architecture that uses simple parametric down-conversion sources, as well as frequency-multiplexed multimode quantum memories and photon-number resolving detectors. We show that this approach can significantly extend quantum communication distances compared to direct transmission. This shows that important trade-offs are possible between the different components of quantum repeater architectures.
  • We assess the overall performance of our quantum key distribution (QKD) system implementing the measurement-device-independent (MDI) protocol using components with varying capabilities such as different single photon detectors and qubit preparation hardware. We experimentally show that superconducting nanowire single photon detectors allow QKD over a channel featuring 60 dB loss, and QKD with more than 600 bits of secret key per second (not considering finite key effects) over a 16 dB loss channel. This corresponds to 300 km and 80 km of standard telecommunication fiber, respectively. We also demonstrate that the integration of our QKD system into FPGA-based hardware (instead of state-of-the-art arbitrary waveform generators) does not impact on its performance. Our investigation allows us to acquire an improved understanding of the trade-offs between complexity, cost and system performance, which is required for future customization of MDI-QKD. Given that our system can be operated outside the laboratory over deployed fiber, we conclude that MDI-QKD is a promising approach to information-theoretic secure key distribution.
  • The realization of a future quantum Internet requires processing and storing quantum information at local nodes, and interconnecting distant nodes using free-space and fibre-optic links. Quantum memories for light are key elements of such quantum networks. However, to date, neither an atomic quantum memory for non-classical states of light operating at a wavelength compatible with standard telecom fibre infrastructure, nor a fibre-based implementation of a quantum memory has been reported. Here we demonstrate the storage and faithful recall of the state of a 1532 nm wavelength photon, entangled with a 795 nm photon, in an ensemble of cryogenically cooled erbium ions doped into a 20 meter-long silicate fibre using a photon-echo quantum memory protocol. Despite its currently limited efficiency and storage time, our broadband light-matter interface brings fibre-based quantum networks one step closer to reality. Furthermore, it facilitates novel tests of light-matter interaction and collective atomic effects in unconventional materials.
  • Decoherence of the 795 nm $^3$H$_6$ to $^3$H$_4$ transition in 1%Tm$^{3+}$:Y$_3$Ga$_5$O$_{12}$ (Tm:YGG) is studied at temperatures as low as 1.2 K. The temperature, magnetic field, frequency, and time-scale (spectral diffusion) dependence of the optical coherence lifetime is measured. Our results show that the coherence lifetime is impacted less by spectral diffusion than other known thulium-doped materials. Photon echo excitation and spectral hole burning methods reveal uniform decoherence properties and the possibility to produce full transparency for persistent spectral holes across the entire 56 GHz inhomogeneous bandwidth of the optical transition. Temperature-dependent decoherence is well described by elastic Raman scattering of phonons with an additional weaker component that may arise from a low density of glass-like dynamic disorder modes (two-level systems). Analysis of the observed behavior suggests that an optical coherence lifetime approaching one millisecond may be possible in this system at temperatures below 1 K for crystals grown with optimized properties. Overall, we find that Tm:YGG has superior decoherence properties compared to other Tm-doped crystals and is a promising candidate for applications that rely on long coherence lifetimes, such as optical quantum memories and photonic signal processing.
  • We investigate the relevant spectroscopic properties of the 795 nm $^3$H$_6$$\leftrightarrow$$^3$H$_4$ transition in 1% Tm$^{3+}$:Y$_3$Ga$_5$O$_{12}$ at temperatures as low as 1.2 K for optical quantum memories based on persistent spectral tailoring of narrow absorption features. Our measurements reveal that this transition has uniform coherence properties over a 56 GHz bandwidth, and a simple hyperfine structure split by $\pm$44 MHz/T with lifetimes of up to hours. Furthermore, we find a $^3$F$_4$ population lifetime of 64 ms -- one of the longest lifetimes observed for an electronic level in a solid --, and an exceptionally long coherence lifetime of 490 $\mu$s -- the longest ever observed for optical transitions of Tm$^{3+}$ ions in a crystal. Our results suggest that this material allows realizing broadband quantum memories that enable spectrally multiplexed quantum repeaters.
  • We experimentally demonstrate a high-efficiency Bell state measurement for time-bin qubits that employs two superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors with short dead-times, allowing projections onto two Bell states, |Psi>- and |Psi+>. Compared to previous implementations for time-bin qubits, this yields an increase in the efficiency of Bell state analysis by a factor of thirty.