• We study the transverse momentum spectrum of hadrons in jets. By measuring the transverse momentum with respect to a judiciously chosen axis, we find that this observable is insensitive to (the recoil of) soft radiation. Furthermore, for small transverse momenta we show that the effects of the jet boundary factorize, leading to a new transverse-momentum-dependent (TMD) fragmentation function. In contrast to the usual TMD fragmentation functions, it does not involve rapidity divergences and is universal in the sense that it is independent of the type of process and number of jets. These results directly apply to sub-jets instead of hadrons. We discuss potential applications, which include studying nuclear modification effects in heavy-ion collisions and identifying boosted heavy resonances.
  • We develop the framework to perform all-orders resummation of electroweak logarithms of Q/M for inclusive scattering processes at energies Q much above the electroweak scale M. We calculate all ingredients needed at next-to-leading logarithmic (NLL) order and provide an explicit recipe to implement this for 2 $\to$ 2 processes. PDF evolution including electroweak corrections, which lead to Sudakov double logarithms, is computed. If only the invariant mass of the final-state is measured, all electroweak logarithms can be resummed by the PDF evolution, at least to LL. However, simply identifying a lepton in the final state requires the corresponding fragmentation function and introduces angular dependence through the exchange of soft gauge bosons. Furthermore, we show the importance of polarization effects for gauge bosons, due to the chiral nature of SU(2) - even the gluon distribution in an unpolarized proton becomes polarized at high scales due to electroweak effects. We justify our approach with a factorization analysis, finding that the objects entering the factorization theorem do not need to be SU(2) $\times$ U(1) gauge singlets, even though we perform the factorization and resummation in the symmetric phase. We also discuss a range of extensions, including jets and how to calculate the EW logarithms when you are fully exclusive in the central (detector) region and fully inclusive in the forward (beam) regions.
  • Transverse and longitudinal electroweak gauge boson parton distribution functions (PDFs) are computed in terms of deep-inelastic scattering structure functions, following the recently developed method to determine the photon PDF. The calculation provides initial conditions at the electroweak scale for PDF evolution to higher energies. Numerical results for the $W^\pm$ and $Z$ transverse, longitudinal and polarized PDFs, as well as the $\gamma Z$ transverse and polarized PDFs are presented.
  • We introduce a method to compute one-loop soft functions for exclusive $N$-jet processes at hadron colliders, allowing for different definitions of the algorithm that determines the jet regions and of the measurements in those regions. In particular, we generalize the $N$-jettiness hemisphere decomposition of [Jouttenus 2011] in a manner that separates the dependence on the jet boundary from the observables measured inside the jet and beam regions. Results are given for several factorizable jet definitions, including anti-$k_T$, XCone, and other geometric partitionings. We calculate explicitly the soft functions for angularity measurements, including jet mass and jet broadening, in $pp \to L + 1$ jet and explore the differences for various jet vetoes and algorithms. This includes a consistent treatment of rapidity divergences when applicable. We also compute analytic results for these soft functions in an expansion for a small jet radius $R$. We find that the small-$R$ results, including corrections up to $\mathcal{O}(R^2)$, accurately capture the full behavior over a large range of $R$.
  • Predictions for our ability to distinguish quark and gluon jets vary by more than a factor of two between different parton showers. We study this problem using analytic resummed predictions for the thrust event shape up to NNLL' using $e^+e^- \to Z \to q \bar q$ and $e^+e^- \to H \to gg$ as proxies for quark and gluon jets. We account for hadronization effects through a nonperturbative shape function, and include an estimate of both perturbative and hadronization uncertainties. In contrast to previous studies, we find reasonable agreement between our results and predictions from both Pythia and Herwig parton showers. We find that this is due to a noticeable improvement in the description of gluon jets in the newest Herwig 7.1 compared to previous versions.
  • We present a framework that describes the energy distribution of subjets of radius $r$ within a jet of radius $R$. We consider both an inclusive sample of subjets as well as subjets centered around a predetermined axis, from which the jet shape can be obtained. For $r \ll R$ we factorize the physics at angular scales $r$ and $R$ to resum the logarithms of $r/R$. For central subjets, we consider both the standard jet axis and the winner-take-all axis, which involve double and single logarithms of $r/R$, respectively. All relevant one-loop matching coefficients are given, and an inconsistency in some previous results for cone jets is resolved. Our results for the standard jet shape differ from previous calculations at next-to-leading logarithmic order, because we account for the recoil of the standard jet axis due to soft radiation. Numerical results are presented for an inclusive subjet sample for $pp \to {\rm jet}+X$ at next-to-leading order plus leading logarithmic order.
  • We introduce a broad class of fractal jet observables that recursively probe the collective properties of hadrons produced in jet fragmentation. To describe these collinear-unsafe observables, we generalize the formalism of fragmentation functions, which are important objects in QCD for calculating cross sections involving identified final-state hadrons. Fragmentation functions are fundamentally nonperturbative, but have a calculable renormalization group evolution. Unlike ordinary fragmentation functions, generalized fragmentation functions exhibit nonlinear evolution, since fractal observables involve correlated subsets of hadrons within a jet. Some special cases of generalized fragmentation functions are reviewed, including jet charge and track functions. We then consider fractal jet observables that are based on hierarchical clustering trees, where the nonlinear evolution equations also exhibit tree-like structure at leading order. We develop a numeric code for performing this evolution and study its phenomenological implications. As an application, we present examples of fractal jet observables that are useful in discriminating quark jets from gluon jets.
  • To predict the jet mass spectrum at a hadron collider it is crucial to account for the resummation of logarithms between the transverse momentum of the jet and its invariant mass $m_J$. For small jet areas there are additional large logarithms of the jet radius $R$, which affect the convergence of the perturbative series. We present an analytic framework for exclusive jet production at the LHC which gives a complete description of the jet mass spectrum including realistic jet algorithms and jet vetoes. It factorizes the scales associated with $m_J$, $R$, and the jet veto, enabling in addition the systematic resummation of jet radius logarithms in the jet mass spectrum beyond leading logarithmic order. We discuss the factorization formulae for the peak and tail region of the jet mass spectrum and for small and large $R$, and the relations between the different regimes and how to combine them. Regions of experimental interest are classified which do not involve large nonglobal logarithms. We also present universal results for nonperturbative effects and discuss various jet vetoes.
  • To describe the transverse momentum spectrum of heavy color-singlet production, the joint resummation of threshold and transverse momentum logarithms is investigated. We obtain factorization theorems for various kinematic regimes valid to all orders in the strong coupling, using Soft-Collinear Effective Theory. We discuss how these enable resummation and how to combine regimes. The new ingredients in the factorization theorems are calculated at next-to-leading order, and a range of consistency checks is performed. Our framework goes beyond the current next-to-leading logarithmic accuracy (NLL).
  • Jets are an important probe to identify the hard interaction of interest at the LHC. They are routinely used in Standard Model precision measurements as well as in searches for new heavy particles, including jet substructure methods. In processes with several jets, one typically encounters hierarchies in the jet transverse momenta and/or dijet invariant masses. Large logarithms of the ratios of these kinematic jet scales in the cross section are at present primarily described by parton showers. We present a general factorization framework called SCET$_+$, which is an extension of Soft-Collinear Effective Theory (SCET) and allows for a systematic higher-order resummation of such kinematic logarithms for generic jet hierarchies. In SCET$_+$ additional intermediate soft/collinear modes are used to resolve jets arising from additional soft and/or collinear QCD emissions. The resulting factorized cross sections utilize collinear splitting amplitudes and soft gluon currents and fully capture spin and color correlations. We discuss how to systematically combine the different kinematic regimes to obtain a complete description of the jet phase space. To present its application in a simple context, we use the case of $e^+e^- \to $3 jets. We then discuss in detail the application to N-jet processes at hadron colliders, considering representative classes of hierarchies from which the general case can be built. This includes in particular multiple hierarchies that are either strongly ordered in angle or energy or not.
  • Helicity amplitudes are the fundamental ingredients of many QCD calculations for multi-leg processes. We describe how these can seamlessly be combined with resummation in Soft-Collinear Effective Theory (SCET), by constructing a helicity operator basis for which the Wilson coefficients are directly given in terms of color-ordered helicity amplitudes. This basis is crossing symmetric and has simple transformation properties under discrete symmetries.
  • Several searches for new physics at the LHC require a fixed number of signal jets, vetoing events with additional jets from QCD radiation. As the probed scale of new physics gets much larger than the jet-veto scale, such jet vetoes strongly impact the QCD perturbative series, causing nontrivial theoretical uncertainties. We consider slepton pair production with 0 signal jets, for which we perform the resummation of jet-veto logarithms and study its impact. Currently, the experimental exclusion limits take the jet-veto cut into account by extrapolating to the inclusive cross section using parton shower Monte Carlos. Our results indicate that the associated theoretical uncertainties can be large, and when taken into account have a sizeable impact already on present exclusion limits. This is improved by performing the resummation to higher order, which allows us to obtain accurate predictions even for high slepton masses. For the interpretation of the experimental results to benefit from improved theory predictions, it would be useful for the experimental analyses to also provide limits on the unfolded visible 0-jet cross section.
  • Many state-of-the-art QCD calculations for multileg processes use helicity amplitudes as their fundamental ingredients. We construct a simple and easy-to-use helicity operator basis in soft-collinear effective theory (SCET), for which the hard Wilson coefficients from matching QCD onto SCET are directly given in terms of color-ordered helicity amplitudes. Using this basis allows one to seamlessly combine fixed-order helicity amplitudes at any order they are known with a resummation of higher-order logarithmic corrections. In particular, the virtual loop amplitudes can be employed in factorization theorems to make predictions for exclusive jet cross sections without the use of numerical subtraction schemes to handle real-virtual infrared cancellations. We also discuss matching onto SCET in renormalization schemes with helicities in $4$- and $d$-dimensions. To demonstrate that our helicity operator basis is easy to use, we provide an explicit construction of the operator basis, as well as results for the hard matching coefficients, for $pp\to H + 0,1,2$ jets, $pp\to W/Z/\gamma + 0,1,2$ jets, and $pp\to 2,3$ jets. These operator bases are completely crossing symmetric, so the results can easily be applied to processes with $e^+e^-$ and $e^-p$ collisions.
  • We present an efficient way to calculate the effect of soft QCD radiation at one loop, which is needed for predictions at next-to-next-to-leading logarithmic accuracy. We use rapidity coordinates and isolate the divergences in the integrand. By performing manipulations with cumulative variables, we avoid complications from plus distributions. We address rapidity divergences, divergences with an azimuthal dependence, complicated jet boundaries and multi-differential measurements. The process and measurements can be easily adjusted, as we demonstrate by reproducing many existing soft functions. The results for a general LHC process with multiple Wilson lines are obtained by treating Wilson lines that are not back-to-back using a boost. We also obtain, for the first time, the N-jettiness soft function for generic jet angularities, and the collinear-soft function for the measurement of two angularities.
  • LHC measurements involve cuts on several observables, but resummed calculations are mostly restricted to single variables. We show how the resummation of a class of double-differential measurements can be achieved through an extension of Soft-Collinear Effective Theory (SCET). A prototypical application is $pp \to Z + 0$ jets, where the jet veto is imposed through the beam thrust event shape ${\mathcal T}$, and the transverse momentum $p_T$ of the $Z$ boson is measured. A standard SCET analysis suffices for $p_T \sim m_Z^{1/2} {\mathcal T}^{1/2}$ and $p_T \sim {\mathcal T}$, but additional collinear-soft modes are needed in the intermediate regime. We show how to match the factorization theorems that describe these three different regions of phase space, and discuss the corresponding relations between fully-unintegrated parton distribution functions, soft functions and the newly defined collinear-soft functions. The missing ingredients needed at NNLL/NLO accuracy are calculated, providing a check of our formalism. We also revisit the calculation of the measurement of two angularities on a single jet in JHEP 1409 (2014) 046, finding a correction to their conjecture for the NLL cross section at ${\mathcal O}(\alpha_s^2)$.
  • An essential part of high-energy hadronic collisions is the soft hadronic activity that underlies the primary hard interaction. It includes soft radiation from the primary hard partons, secondary multiple parton interactions (MPI), and factorization-violating effects. The invariant mass spectrum of the leading jet in $Z$+jet and $H$+jet events is directly sensitive to these effects, and we use a QCD factorization theorem to predict its dependence on the jet radius $R$, jet $p_T$, jet rapidity, and partonic process for both the perturbative and nonperturbative components of primary soft radiation. We prove that the nonperturbative contributions involve only odd powers of $R$, and the linear $R$ term is universal for quark and gluon jets. The hadronization model in PYTHIA8 agrees well with these properties. The perturbative soft initial state radiation (ISR) has a contribution that depends on the jet area in the same way as the underlying event, but this degeneracy is broken by dependence on the jet $p_T$. The size of this soft ISR contribution is proportional to the color state of the initial partons, yielding the same positive contribution for $gg\to Hg$ and $gq\to Zq$, but a negative interference contribution for $q\bar q\to Z g$. Hence, measuring these dependencies allows one to separate hadronization, soft ISR, and MPI contributions in the data.
  • Discriminating quark jets from gluon jets is an important but challenging problem in jet substructure. In this paper, we use the concept of mutual information to illuminate the physics of quark/gluon tagging. Ideal quark/gluon separation requires only one bit of truth information, so even if two discriminant variables are largely uncorrelated, they can still share the same "truth overlap". Mutual information can be used to diagnose such situations, and thus determine which discriminant variables are redundant and which can be combined to improve performance. Using both parton showers and analytic resummation, we study a two-parameter family of generalized angularities, which includes familiar infrared and collinear (IRC) safe observables like thrust and broadening, as well as IRC unsafe variants like $p_T^D$ and hadron multiplicity. At leading-logarithmic (LL) order, the bulk of these variables exhibit Casimir scaling, such that their truth overlap is a universal function of the color factor ratio $C_A/C_F$. Only at next-to-leading-logarithmic (NLL) order can one see a difference in quark/gluon performance. For the IRC safe angularities, we show that the quark/gluon performance can be improved by combining angularities with complementary angular exponents. Interestingly, LL order, NLL order, Pythia 8, and Herwig++ all exhibit similar correlations between observables, but there are significant differences in the predicted quark/gluon discrimination power. For the IRC unsafe angularities, we show that the mutual information can be calculated analytically with the help of a nonperturbative "weighted-energy function", providing evidence for the complementarity of safe and unsafe observables for quark/gluon discrimination.
  • An overview of theoretical and experimental progress in double parton scattering (DPS) is presented. The theoretical topics cover factorization in DPS, models for double parton distributions and DPS in charm production and nuclear collisions. On the experimental side, CMS results for dijet and double J/\psi\ production, in light of DPS, as well as first results for the 4-jet channel are presented. ALICE reports on a study of open charm and J/\psi\ multiplicity dependence.
  • Beam and jet functions in Soft-Collinear Effective Theory describe collinear initial- and final-state radiation (jets), and enter in factorization theorems for N-jet production, the Higgs pT spectrum, etc. We show that they may directly be calculated as phase-space integrals of QCD splitting functions. At NLO all computations are trivial, as we demonstrate explicitly for the beam function, the transverse-momentum-dependent beam function, the jet function and the fragmenting jet function. This approach also highlights the role of crossing symmetry in these calculations. At NNLO we reproduce the quark jet function and calculate the fragmenting quark jet function for the first time. Here we use two methods: a direct phase-space integration and a reduction to master integrals which are computed using differential equations.
  • We develop a Feynman diagram approach to calculating correlations of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) in the presence of distortions. As one application, we focus on CMB distortions due to gravitational lensing by Large Scale Structure (LSS). We study the Hu-Okamoto quadratic estimator for extracting lensing from the CMB and derive the noise of the estimator up to ${\mathcal O}(\phi^4)$ in the lensing potential $\phi$. The previously noted large ${\mathcal O}(\phi^4)$ term can be significantly reduced by a reorganization of the $\phi$ expansion. Our approach makes it simple to obtain expressions for quadratic estimators based on any CMB channel. We briefly discuss other applications to cosmology of this diagrammatic approach, such as distortions of the CMB due to patchy reionization, or due to Faraday rotation from primordial axion fields.
  • We develop a method for calculating the correlation structure of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) using Feynman diagrams, when the CMB has been modified by gravitational lensing, Faraday rotation, patchy reionization, or other distorting effects. This method is used to calculate the bias of the Hu-Okamoto quadratic estimator in reconstructing the lensing power spectrum up to O(\phi^4) in the lensing potential $\phi$. We consider both the diagonal noise TTTT, EBEB, etc. and, for the first time, the off-diagonal noise TTTE, TBEB, etc. The previously noted large O(\phi^4) term in the second order noise is identified to come from a particular class of diagrams. It can be significantly reduced by a reorganization of the $\phi$ expansion. These improved estimators have almost no bias for the off-diagonal case involving only one $B$ component of the CMB, such as EEEB.
  • By using observables that only depend on charged particles (tracks), one can efficiently suppress pile-up contamination at the LHC. Such measurements are not infrared safe in perturbation theory, so any calculation of track-based observables must account for hadronization effects. We develop a formalism to perform these calculations in QCD, by matching partonic cross sections onto new non-perturbative objects called track functions which absorb infrared divergences. The track function T_i(x) describes the energy fraction x of a hard parton i which is converted into charged hadrons. We give a field-theoretic definition of the track function and derive its renormalization group evolution, which is in excellent agreement with the Pythia parton shower. We then perform a next-to-leading order calculation of the total energy fraction of charged particles in e+ e- -> hadrons. To demonstrate the implications of our framework for the LHC, we match the Pythia parton shower onto a set of track functions to describe the track mass distribution in Higgs plus one jet events. We also show how to reduce smearing due to hadronization fluctuations by measuring dimensionless track-based ratios.
  • In e+e- event shapes studies at LEP, two different measurements were sometimes performed: a "calorimetric" measurement using both charged and neutral particles, and a "track-based" measurement using just charged particles. Whereas calorimetric measurements are infrared and collinear safe and therefore calculable in perturbative QCD, track-based measurements necessarily depend on non-perturbative hadronization effects. On the other hand, track-based measurements typically have smaller experimental uncertainties. In this paper, we present the first calculation of the event shape track thrust and compare to measurements performed at ALEPH and DELPHI. This calculation is made possible through the recently developed formalism of track functions, which are non-perturbative objects describing how energetic partons fragment into charged hadrons. By incorporating track functions into soft-collinear effective theory, we calculate the distribution for track thrust with next-to-leading logarithmic resummation. Due to a partial cancellation between non-perturbative parameters, the distributions for calorimeter thrust and track thrust are remarkably similar, a feature also seen in LEP data.
  • The invariant mass of a jet is a benchmark variable describing the structure of jets at the LHC. We calculate the jet mass spectrum for Higgs plus one jet at the LHC at next-to-next-to-leading logarithmic (NNLL) order using a factorization formula. At this order, the cross section becomes sensitive to perturbation theory at the soft m_jet^2/p_T^jet scale. Our calculation is exclusive and uses the 1-jettiness global event shape to implement a veto on additional jets. The dominant dependence on the jet veto is removed by normalizing the spectrum, leaving residual dependence from non-global logarithms depending on the ratio of the jet mass and jet veto variables. For our exclusive jet cross section these non-global logarithms are parametrically smaller than in the inclusive case, allowing us to obtain a complete NNLL result. Results for the dependence of the jet mass spectrum on the kinematics, jet algorithm, and jet size R are given. Using individual partonic channels we illustrate the difference between the jet mass spectra for quark and gluon jets. We also study the effect of hadronization and underlying event on the jet mass in PYTHIA. To highlight the similarity of inclusive and exclusive jet mass spectra, a comparison to LHC data is presented.
  • Knowing the charge of the parton initiating a light-quark jet could be extremely useful both for testing aspects of the Standard Model and for characterizing potential beyond-the-Standard-Model signals. We show that despite the complications of hadronization and out-of-jet radiation such as pile-up, a weighted sum of the charges of a jet's constituents can be used at the LHC to distinguish among jets with different charges. Potential applications include measuring electroweak quantum numbers of hadronically decaying resonances or supersymmetric particles, as well as Standard Model tests, such as jet charge in dijet events or in hadronically-decaying W bosons in t-tbar events. We develop a systematically improvable method to calculate moments of these charge distributions by combining multi-hadron fragmentation functions with perturbative jet functions and pertubative evolution equations. We show that the dependence on energy and jet size for the average and width of the jet charge can be calculated despite the large experimental uncertainty on fragmentation functions. These calculations can provide a validation tool for data independent of Monte-Carlo fragmentation models.