• Here we use angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy to study superconductivity that emerges in two extreme cases, from a Fermi liquid phase (LiFeAs) and an incoherent bad-metal phase (FeTe0.55Se0.45). We find that although the electronic coherence can strongly reshape the single-particle spectral function in the superconducting state, it is decoupled from the maximum superconducting pairing amplitude, which shows a universal scaling that is valid for all FeSCs. Our observation excludes pairing scenarios in the BCS and the BEC limit for FeSCs and calls for a universal strong coupling pairing mechanism for the FeSCs.
  • We synthesized a series of V-doped LiFe$_{1-x}$V$_x$As single crystals. The superconducting transition temperature $T_c$ of LiFeAs decreases rapidly at a rate of 7 K per 1\% V. The Hall coefficient of LiFeAs switches from negative to positive with 4.2\% V doping, showing that V doping introduces hole carriers. This observation is further confirmed by the evaluation of the Fermi surface volume measured by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES), from which a 0.3 hole doping per V atom introduced is deduced. Interestingly, the introduction of holes does not follow a rigid band shift. We also show that the temperature evolution of the electrical resistivity as a function of doping is consistent with a crossover from a Fermi liquid to a non-Fermi liquid. Our ARPES data indicate that the non-Fermi liquid behavior is mostly enhanced when one of the hole $d_{xz}/d_{yz}$ Fermi surfaces is well nested by the antiferromagnetic wave vector to the inner electron Fermi surface pocket with the $d_{xy}$ orbital character. The magnetic susceptibility of LiFe$_{1-x}$V$_x$As suggests the presence of strong magnetic impurities following V doping, thus providing a natural explanation to the rapid suppression of superconductivity upon V doping.
  • One of the basic features of iron-based superconductors is the multi-orbital nature. In momentum space, the multi-orbital nature of the iron-based superconductivity manifests itself as the Fermi sheet dependence of the Cooper pairing strength. Here we report a real-space study, using scanning tunnelling microscopy/spectroscopy (STM/S), on the Cooper pairing in Ba0.6K0.4Fe2As2 and LiFeAs single crystals. On different terminating surfaces with their distinct atomic identities, we have observed different types of fully opened superconducting gap structures. Symmetry analysis on the Fe3d-As4p orbital hybridization suggests that the tunnelling on different terminating surfaces probes different Fe3d orbitals. Therefore, the phenomenon of the surface dependent gap structures essentially demonstrates the orbital feature of the Cooper pairing in the Fe-As layer.
  • The optical properties of LiFeAs with $T_c \simeq$ 18 K have been determined in the normal and superconducting states. The superposition of two Drude components yields a good description of the low-frequency optical response in the normal state. Below $T_c$, the optical conductivity reveals two isotropic superconducting gaps with $\Delta_{1} \simeq 2.9$ $\pm$ 0.2 meV and $\Delta_{2} \simeq 5.5$ $\pm$ 0.4 meV. A comparison between the superconducting-state Mattis-Bardeen and the normal-state Drude components, in combination with a spectral weight analysis, indicates that the spectral weight associated with a band which has a very small scattering rate is fully transferred to the superfluid weight upon the superconducting condensate. These observations provide clear evidence for the coexistence of clean- and dirty-limit superconductivity in LiFeAs.
  • In copper-oxide and iron-based high temperature (high-$T_{\rm c}$) superconductors, many physical properties exhibit in-plane anisotropy, which is believed to be caused by a rotational symmetry-breaking nematic order, whose origin and its relationship to superconductivity remain elusive. In many iron-pnictides, a tetragonal-to-orthorhombic structural transition temperature $T_{\rm s}$ coincides with the magnetic transition temperature $T_{\rm N}$, making the orbital and spin degrees of freedom highly entangled. NaFeAs is a system where $T_{\rm s}$ = 54 K is well separated from $T_{\rm N}$ = 42 K, which helps simplify the experimental situation. Here we report nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements on NaFe$_{1-x}$Co$_x$As (0 $\leq x \leq$ 0.042) that revealed orbital and spin nematicity occurring at a temperature $T^{\rm *}$ far above $T_{\rm s}$ in the tetragonal phase. We show that the NMR spectra splitting and its evolution can be explained by an incommensurate orbital order that sets in below $T^{\rm *}$ and becomes commensurate below $T_{\rm s}$, which brings about the observed spin nematicity.
  • A series of LiFe$_{1-x}$Co$_{x}$As compounds with different Co concentrations have been studied by transport, optical spectroscopy, angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and nuclear magnetic resonance. We observed a Fermi liquid to non-Fermi liquid to Fermi liquid (FL-NFL-FL) crossover alongside a monotonic suppression of the superconductivity with increasing Co content. In parallel to the FL-NFL-FL crossover, we found that both the low-energy spin fluctuations and Fermi surface nesting are enhanced and then diminished, strongly suggesting that the NFL behavior in LiFe$_{1-x}$Co$_{x}$As is induced by low-energy spin fluctuations which are very likely tuned by Fermi surface nesting. Our study reveals a unique phase diagram of LiFe$_{1-x}$Co$_{x}$As where the region of NFL is moved to the boundary of the superconducting phase, implying that they are probably governed by different mechanisms.
  • Recently, A2B3 type strong spin orbital coupling compounds such as Bi2Te3, Bi2Se3 and Sb2Te3 were theoretically predicated to be topological insulators and demonstrated through experimental efforts. The counterpart compound Sb2Se3 on the other hand was found to be topological trivial, but further theoretical studies indicated that the pressure might induce Sb2Se3 into a topological nontrivial state. Here, we report on the discovery of superconductivity in Sb2Se3 single crystal induced via pressure. Our experiments indicated that Sb2Se3 became superconductive at high pressures above 10 GPa proceeded by a pressure induced insulator to metal like transition at ~3 GPa which should be related to the topological quantum transition. The superconducting transition temperature (TC) increased to around 8.0 K with pressure up to 40 GPa while it keeps ambient structure. High pressure Raman revealed that new modes appeared around 10 GPa and 20 GPa, respectively, which correspond to occurrence of superconductivity and to the change of TC slop as the function of high pressure in conjunction with the evolutions of structural parameters at high pressures.
  • A new diluted ferromagnetic semiconductor (Sr,Na)(Zn,Mn)2As2 is reported, in which charge and spin doping are decoupled via Sr/Na and Zn/Mn substitutions, respectively, being distinguished from classic (Ga,Mn)As where charge & spin doping are simultaneously integrated. Different from the recently reported ferromagnetic (Ba,K)(Zn,Mn)2As2, this material crystallizes into the hexagonal CaAl2Si2-type structure. Ferromagnetism with a Curie temperature up to 20 K has been observed from magnetization. The muon spin relaxation measurements suggest that the exchange interaction between Mn moments of this new system could be different to the earlier DMS systems. This system provides an important means for studying ferromagnetism in diluted magnetic semiconductors.
  • Here we report the successful synthesis of a spin- & charge-decoupled diluted magnetic semiconductor (Ca,Na)(Zn,Mn)2As2, crystallizing into the hexagonal CaAl2Si2 structure. The compound shows a ferromagnetic transition with a Curie temperature up to 33 K with 10% Na doping, which gives rise to carrier density of np~10^20 cm^-3. The new DMS is a soft magnetic material with HC<400 Oe. The anomalous Hall effect is observed below the ferromagnetic ordering temperature. With increasing Mn doping, ferromagnetic order is accompanied by an interaction between the local spin and mobile charge, giving rise to a minimum in resistivity at low temperatures and localizing the conduction electrons. The system provides an ideal platform for studying the interaction of the local spins and conduction electrons.
  • In conventional BCS superconductors, the quantum condensation of superconducting electron pairs is understood as a Fermi surface (FS) instability, in which the low-energy electrons are paired by attractive interactions. Whether this explanation is still valid in high-Tc superconductors such as cuprates and iron-based superconductors remains an open question. In particular, a fundamentally different picture of the electron pairs, which are believed to be formed locally by repulsive interactions, may prevail. Here we report a high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy study on LiFe1-xCoxAs. We reveal a large and robust superconducting (SC) gap on a band sinking below the Fermi energy upon Co substitution. The observed FS-free SC order is also the largest over the momentum space, which rules out a proximity effect origin and indicates that the SC order parameter is not tied to the FS as a result of a FS instability.
  • The diversities in crystal structures and ways of doping result in extremely diversified phase diagrams for iron-based superconductors. With angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES), we have systematically studied the effects of chemical substitution on the electronic structure of various series of iron-based superconductors. In addition to the control of Fermi surface topology by heterovalent doping, we found two more extraordinary effects of doping: 1. the site and band dependencies of quasiparticle scattering; and more importantly 2. the ubiquitous and significant bandwidth-control by both isovalent and heterovalent dopants in the iron-anion layer. Moreover, we found that the bandwidth-control could be achieved by either applying the chemical pressure or doping electrons, but not by doping holes. Together with other findings provided here, these results complete the microscopic picture of the electronic effects of dopants, which facilitates a unified understanding of the diversified phase diagrams and resolutions to many open issues of various iron-based superconductors.
  • LiFeAs is unique among the arsenic based Fe-pnictide superconductors because it is the only nearly stoichiometric compound which does not exhibit magnetic order. This is at odds with electronic structure calculations which and a very stable magnetic state and predict cylindrical hole- and electron-like Fermi surface sheets whose geometry suggests spin uctuations and a possible instability toward long-range ordering at the nesting vector. In fact, a complex magnetic phase-diagram is indeed observed in the isostructural NaFeAs compound. Previous angle resolved photoemission (ARPES) experiments revealed the existence of both hole and electron-like surfaces, but with rather distinct cross-sectional areas and an absence of the nesting that is thought to underpin both magnetic order and superconductivity in the pnictide family of superconductors. These ARPES observations were challenged by subsequent de Haas van Alphen (dHvA) measurements which detected a few, electron like Fermi surface sheets in rough agreement with the original band calculations. Here, we show a detailed dHvA study unveiling additional, small and nearly isotropic Fermi surface sheets in LiFeAs single crystals, which ought to correspond to hole-like orbits, as previously observed by ARPES. Therefore, our results conciliate the apparent discrepancy between ARPES and the previous dHvA results5. The small size of these Fermi surface pockets suggests a prominent role for the electronic correlations in LiFeAs. The absence of gap nodes, in combination with the coexistence of quasi-two-dimensional and three-dimensional Fermi surfaces, favor a s-wave pairing symmetry for LiFeAs. But similar electron-like Fermi surfaces combined with very different hole pockets between LiFeAs and LiFeP, suggest that the nodes in the gap function of LiFeP might be located on the hole-pockets.
  • We report the discovery of a new diluted magnetic semiconductor, Li(Zn,Mn)P, in which charge and spin are introduced independently via lithium off-stoichiometry and the isovalent substitution of Mn2+ for Zn2+, respectively. Isostructural to (Ga,Mn)As, Li(Zn,Mn)P was found to be a p-type ferromagnetic semiconductor with excess Lithium providing charge doping. First principles calculations indicate that excess Li is favored to partially occupy the Zn site, leading to hole doping. Ferromagnetism is mediated in semiconducting samples of relative low mobile carriers with a small coercive force, indicating an easy spin flip.
  • The driving forces behind electronic nematicity in the iron pnictides remain hotly debated. We use atomic-resolution variable-temperature scanning tunneling spectroscopy to provide the first direct visual evidence that local electronic nematicity and unidirectional antiferroic (stripe) fluctuations persist to temperatures almost twice the nominal structural ordering temperature in the parent pnictide NaFeAs. Low-temperature spectroscopic imaging of nematically-ordered NaFeAs shows anisotropic electronic features that are not observed for isostructural, non-nematic LiFeAs. The local electronic features are shown to arise from scattering interference around crystalline defects in NaFeAs, and their spatial anisotropy is a direct consequence of the structural and stripe-magnetic order present at low temperature. We show that the anisotropic features persist up to high temperatures in the nominally tetragonal phase of the crystal. The spatial distribution and energy dependence of the anisotropy at high temperatures is explained by the persistence of large amplitude, short-range, unidirectional, antiferroic (stripe) fluctuations, indicating that strong density wave fluctuations exist and couple to near-Fermi surface electrons even far from the structural and density wave phase boundaries.
  • Diluted magnetic semiconductors (DMS) have received much attention due to its potential applications to spintronics devices. A prototypical system (Ga,Mn)As has been widely studied since 1990s. The simultaneous spin and charge doping via hetero-valence (Ga3+,Mn2+) substitution, however, resulted in severely limited solubility without availability of bulk specimens. Previously we synthesized a new diluted ferromagnetic semiconductor of bulk Li(Zn,Mn)As with Tc up to 50K, where isovalent (Zn,Mn) spin doping was separated from charge control via Li concentrations. Here we report the synthesis of a new diluted ferromagnetic semiconductor (Ba1-xKx)(Zn1-yMny)2As2, isostructural to iron 122 system, where holes are doped via (Ba2+, K1+), while spins via (Zn2+,Mn2+) substitutions. Bulk samples with x=0.1-0.3 and y=0.05-0.15 exhibit ferromagnetic order with TC up to 180K, comparable to that of record high Tc for Ga(MnAs), significantly enhanced than Li(Zn,Mn)As. Moreover the (Ba,K)(Zn,Mn)2As2 shares the same 122 crystal structure with semiconducting BaZn2As2, antiferromagnetic BaMn2As2, and superconducting (Ba,K)Fe2As2, which makes them promising to the development of multilayer functional devices.
  • Single crystalline CaFe2As2 and (Ca1-xNax)Fe2As2 polycrystals (0 < x < 0.66) are synthesized and characterized using structural, magnetic, electronic transport, and heat capacity measurements. These measurements show that the structural/magnetic phase transition in CaFe2As2 at 165 K is monotonically suppressed by the Na doping and that superconductivity can be realized over a wide doping region. For 0.3 < x < 0.36, the magnetic susceptibilities indicate the possible coexistence of the spin density wave (SDW) and superconductivity. Superconducting phases corresponding to the Na doping level in (Ca1-xNax)Fe2As2 for nominal x = 0.36, 0.4, 0.5, 0.6, and 0.66, with Tc = 17 K, 19 K, 22 K, 33 K, and 33 K, respectively, are identified. The effects of the magnetic field on the superconductivity transitions for x = 0.66 samples with high upper critical fields Hc2 \approx 103 T are studied, and a phase diagram of the SDW and superconductivity as a function of the doping level is thus presented.
  • We use neutron scattering to determine spin excitations in single crystals of nonsuperconducting Li1-xFeAs throughout the Brillouin zone. Although angle resolved photoemission experiments and local density approximation calculations suggest poor Fermi surface nesting conditions for antiferromagnetic(AF) order, spin excitations in Li1-xFeAs occur at the AF wave vectors Q = (1, 0) at low energies, but move to wave vectors Q = (\pm 0.5, \pm0.5) near the zone boundary with a total magnetic bandwidth comparable to that of BaFe2As2. These results reveal that AF spin excitations still dominate the low-energy physics of these materials and suggest both itinerancy and strong electron-electron correlations are essential to understand the measured magnetic excitations.
  • We present extensive 75As NMR and NQR data on the superconducting arsenides PrFeAs0.89F0.11 (Tc=45 K), LaFeAsO0.92F0.08 (Tc=27 K), LiFeAs (Tc = 17 K) and Ba0.72K0.28Fe2As2 (Tc = 31.5 K) single crystal, and compare with the nickel analog LaNiAsO0.9F0.1 (Tc=4.0 K) . In contrast to LaNiAsO0.9F0.1 where the superconducting gap is shown to be isotropic, the spin lattice relaxation rate 1/T1 in the Fe-arsenides decreases below Tc with no coherence peak and shows a step-wise variation at low temperatures. The Knight shift decreases below Tc and shows a step-wise T variation as well. These results indicate spinsinglet superconductivity with multiple gaps in the Fe-arsenides. The Fe antiferromagnetic spin fluctuations are anisotropic and weaker compared to underdoped copper-oxides or cobalt-oxide superconductors, while there is no significant electron correlations in LaNiAsO0.9F0.1. We will discuss the implications of these results and highlight the importance of the Fermi surface topology.
  • Bi2Te3 compound has been theoretically predicted (1) to be a topological insulator, and its topologically non-trivial surface state with a single Dirac cone has been observed in photoemission experiments (2). Here we report that superconductivity (Tc^~3K) can be induced in Bi2Te3 as-grown single crystal (with hole-carriers) via pressure. The first-principles calculations show that the electronic structure under pressure remains to be topologically nontrivial, and the Dirac-type surface states can be well distinguished from bulk states at corresponding Fermi level. The proximity effect between superconducting bulk states and Dirac-type surface state could generate Majorana fermions on the surface. We also discuss the possibility that the bulk state could be a topological superconductor.
  • We report the $^{75}$As-NQR and NMR studies on the iron arsenide superconductor Li$_{x}$FeAs with $T_{\rm c} \sim 17$ K. The spin lattice relaxation rate, $1/T_{1}$, decreases below $T_{\rm c}$ without a coherence peak, and can be fitted by gaps with s$^{\pm}$-wave symmetry in the presence of impurity scattering. In the normal state, both $1/T_{1}T$ and the Knight shift decrease with decreasing temperature but become constant below $T \leq 50 K$. Estimate of the Korringa ratio shows that the spin correlations are weaker than that in other families of iron arsenides, which may account for the lower $T_{\rm c}$ in this material.
  • Electrical-resistivity and magnetic-susceptibility measurements under hydrostatic pressure up to p = 2.75 GPa have been performed on superconducting LiFeP. A broad superconducting (SC) region exists in the temperature - pressure (T-p) phase diagram. No indications for a spin-density-wave transition have been found, but an enhanced resistivity coefficient at low pressures hints at the presence of magnetic fluctuations. Our results show that the superconducting state in LiFeP is more robust than in the isostructural and isoelectronic LiFeAs. We suggest that this finding is related to the nearly regular [FeP_4] tetrahedron in LiFeP.
  • The effect of pressure on superconductivity of 111 type NaxFeAs is investigated through temperature dependent electrical resistance measurement in a diamond anvil cell. The superconducting transition temperature (Tc) increases from 26 K to a maximum 31 K as the pressure increases from ambient to 3 GPa. Further increasing pressure suppresses Tc drastically. The behavior of pressure tuned Tc in NaxFeAs is much different from that in LixFeAs, although they have the same Cu2Sb type structure
  • A new iron pnictide LiFeP superconductor was found. The compound crystallizes into a Cu2Sb structure containing an FeP layer showing superconductivity with maximum Tc of 6K. This is the first 111 type iron pnictide superconductor containing no arsenic. The new superconductor is featured with itinerant behavior at normal state that could helpful to understand the novel superconducting mechanism of iron pnictide compounds.