• Ferroelectric domain walls represent multifunctional 2D-elements with great potential for novel device paradigms at the nanoscale. Improper ferroelectrics display particularly promising types of domain walls, which, due to their unique robustness, are the ideal template for imposing specific electronic behavior. Chemical doping, for instance, induces p- or n-type characteristics and electric fields reversibly switch between resistive and conductive domain-wall states. Here, we demonstrate diode-like conversion of alternating-current (AC) into direct-current (DC) output based on neutral 180$^{\circ}$ domain walls in improper ferroelectric ErMnO$_3$. By combining scanning probe and dielectric spectroscopy, we show that the rectification occurs for frequencies at which the domain walls are fixed to their equilibrium position. The practical frequency regime and magnitude of the output is controlled by the bulk conductivity. Using density functional theory we attribute the transport behavior at the neutral walls to an accumulation of oxygen defects. Our study reveals domain walls acting as 2D half-wave rectifiers, extending domain-wall-based nanoelectronic applications into the realm of AC technology.
  • Thermoelectric materials can be used to convert heat to electric power through the Seebeck effect. We study magneto-thermoelectric figure of merit (ZT) in three-dimensional Dirac semimetal Cd$_3$As$_2$ crystal. It is found that enhancement of power factor and reduction of thermal conductivity can be realized at the same time through magnetic field although magnetoresistivity is greatly increased. ZT can be highly enhanced from 0.17 to 1.1 by more than six times around 350 K under a perpendicular magnetic field of 7 Tesla. The huge enhancement of ZT by magnetic field arises from the linear Dirac band with large Fermi velocity and the large electric thermal conductivity in Cd$_3$As$_2$. Our work paves a new way to greatly enhance the thermoelectric performance in the quantum topological materials.
  • Resonant elastic X-ray scattering is a powerful technique for measuring multipolar order parameters. In this paper, we theoretically and experimentally study the possibility of using this technique to detect the proposed multipolar order parameters in URu$_2$Si$_2$ at the U-$L_{3}$ edge with the electric quadrupolar transition. Based on an atomic model, we calculate the azimuthal dependence of the quadrupolar transition at the U-$L_{3}$ edge. The results illustrate the potential of this technique for distinguishing different multipolar order parameters. We then perform experiments on ultra-clean single crystals of URu$_2$Si$_2$ at the U-$L_{3}$ edge to search for the predicted signal, but do not detect any indications of multipolar moments within the experimental uncertainty. We theoretically estimate the orders of magnitude of the cross-section and the expected count rate of the quadrupolar transition and compare them to the dipolar transitions at the U-$M_4$ and U-$L_3$ edges, clarifying the difficulty in detecting higher order multipolar order parameters in URu$_2$Si$_2$ in the current experimental setup.
  • Topological Dirac and Weyl semimetals not only host quasiparticles analogous to the elementary fermionic particles in high-energy physics, but also have nontrivial band topology manifested by exotic Fermi arcs on the surface. Recent advances suggest new types of topological semimetals, in which spatial symmetries protect gapless electronic excitations without high-energy analogy. Here we observe triply-degenerate nodal points (TPs) near the Fermi level of WC, in which the low-energy quasiparticles are described as three-component fermions distinct from Dirac and Weyl fermions. We further observe the surface states whose constant energy contours are pairs of Fermi arcs connecting the surface projection of the TPs, proving the nontrivial topology of the newly identified semimetal state.
  • We present Hubble Space Telescope imaging confirming the optical disappearance of the failed supernova (SN) candidate identified by Gerke et al. (2015). This $\sim 25~M_{\odot}$ red supergiant experienced a weak $\sim 10^{6}~L_{\odot}$ optical outburst in 2009 and is now at least 5 magnitudes fainter than the progenitor in the optical. The mid-IR flux has slowly decreased to the lowest levels since the first measurements in 2004. There is faint ($2000-3000~L_{\odot}$) near-IR emission likely associated with the source. We find the late-time evolution of the source to be inconsistent with obscuration from an ejected, dusty shell. Models of the spectral energy distribution indicate that the remaining bolometric luminosity is $>6$ times fainter than that of the progenitor and is decreasing as $\sim t^{-4/3}$. We conclude that the transient is unlikely to be a SN impostor or stellar merger. The event is consistent with the ejection of the envelope of a red supergiant in a failed SN and the late-time emission could be powered by fallback accretion onto a newly-formed black hole. Future IR and X-ray observations are needed to confirm this interpretation of the fate for the star.
  • SNO Collaboration: B. Aharmim, S. N. Ahmed, A. E. Anthony, N. Barros, E. W. Beier, A. Bellerive, B. Beltran, M. Bergevin, S. D. Biller, K. Boudjemline, M. G. Boulay, B. Cai, Y. D. Chan, D. Chauhan, M. Chen, B. T. Cleveland, G. A. Cox, X. Dai, H. Deng, J. A. Detwiler, P. J. Doe, G. Doucas, P.-L. Drouin, F. A. Duncan, M. Dunford, E. D. Earle, S. R. Elliott, H. C. Evans, G. T. Ewan, J. Farine, H. Fergani, F. Fleurot, R. J. Ford, J. A. Formaggio, N. Gagnon, J. TM. Goon, K. Graham, E. Guillian, S. Habib, R. L. Hahn, A. L. Hallin, E. D. Hallman, P. J. Harvey, R. Hazama, W. J. Heintzelman, J. Heise, R. L. Helmer, A. Hime, C. Howard, M. Huang, P. Jagam, B. Jamieson, N. A. Jelley, M. Jerkins, K. J. Keeter, J. R. Klein, L. L. Kormos, M. Kos, A. Kruger, C. Kraus, C. B. Krauss, T. Kutter, C. C. M. Kyba, R. Lange, J. Law, I. T. Lawson, K. T. Lesko, J. R. Leslie, I. Levine, J. C. Loach, R. MacLellan, S. Majerus, H. B. Mak, J. Maneira, R. D. Martin, N. McCauley, A. B. McDonald, S. R. McGee, M. L. Miller, B. Monreal, J. Monroe, B. G. Nickel, A. J. Noble, H. M. O'Keeffe, N. S. Oblath, C. E. Okada, R. W. Ollerhead, G. D. OrebiGann, S. M. Oser, R. A. Ott, S. J. M. Peeters, A. W. P. Poon, G. Prior, S. D. Reitzner, K. Rielage, B. C. Robertson, R. G. H. Robertson, M. H. Schwendener, J. A. Secrest, S. R. Seibert, O. Simard, J. J. Simpson, D. Sinclair, P. Skensved, T. J. Sonley, L. C. Stonehill, G. Tesic, N. Tolich, T. Tsui, R. Van Berg, B. A. VanDevender, C. J. Virtue, B. L. Wall, D. Waller, H. Wan Chan Tseung, D. L. Wark, J. Wendland, N. West, J. F. Wilkerson, J. R. Wilson, A. Wright, M. Yeh, F. Zhang, K. Zuber
    Tests on $B-L$ symmetry breaking models are important probes to search for new physics. One proposed model with $\Delta(B-L)=2$ involves the oscillations of a neutron to an antineutron. In this paper a new limit on this process is derived for the data acquired from all three operational phases of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory experiment. The search was concentrated in oscillations occurring within the deuteron, and 23 events are observed against a background expectation of 30.5 events. These translate to a lower limit on the nuclear lifetime of $1.48\times 10^{31}$ years at 90% confidence level (CL) when no restriction is placed on the signal likelihood space (unbounded). Alternatively, a lower limit on the nuclear lifetime was found to be $1.18\times 10^{31}$ years at 90% CL when the signal was forced into a positive likelihood space (bounded). Values for the free oscillation time derived from various models are also provided in this article. This is the first search for neutron-antineutron oscillation with the deuteron as a target.
  • The PICASSO dark matter search experiment operated an array of 32 superheated droplet detectors containing 3.0 kg of C$_{4}$F$_{10}$ and collected an exposure of 231.4 kgd at SNOLAB between March 2012 and January 2014. We report on the final results of this experiment which includes for the first time the complete data set and improved analysis techniques including \mbox{acoustic} localization to allow fiducialization and removal of higher activity regions within the detectors. No signal consistent with dark matter was observed. We set limits for spin-dependent interactions on protons of $\sigma_p^{SD}$~=~1.32~$\times$~10$^{-2}$~pb (90\%~C.L.) at a WIMP mass of 20 GeV/c$^{2}$. In the spin-independent sector we exclude cross sections larger than $\sigma_p^{SI}$~=~4.86~$\times$~10$^{-5 }$~pb~(90\% C.L.) in the region around 7 GeV/c$^{2}$. The pioneering efforts of the PICASSO experiment have paved the way forward for a next generation detector incorporating much of this technology and experience into larger mass bubble chambers.
  • We discover a pair of spin-polarized surface bands on the (111) face of grey arsenic by using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). In the occupied side, the pair resembles typical nearly-free-electron Shockley states observed on noble-metal surfaces. However, pump-probe ARPES reveals that the spin-polarized pair traverses the bulk band gap and that the crossing of the pair at $\bar\Gamma$ is topologically unavoidable. First-principles calculations well reproduce the bands and their non-trivial topology; the calculations also support that the surface states are of Shockley type because they arise from a band inversion caused by crystal field. The results provide compelling evidence that topological Shockley states are realized on As(111).
  • We present a promising new technique, the g-distribution method, for measuring the inclination angle (i), the innermost stable circular orbit (ISCO), and the spin of a supermassive black hole. The g-distribution method uses measurements of the energy shifts in the relativistic iron line emitted by the accretion disk of a supermassive black hole due to microlensing by stars in a foreground galaxy relative to the g-distribution shifts predicted from microlensing caustic calculations. We apply the method to the gravitationally lensed quasars RX J1131-1231 (z_s=0.658, z_l=0.295), QJ 0158-4325 (z_s=1.294, z_l=0.317), and SDSS 1004+4112 (z_s=1.734, z_l=0.68). For RX J1131-1231 our initial results indicate that r_ISCO<8.5 gravitational radii (r_g) and i > 76 degrees. We detect two shifted Fe lines, in several observations, as predicted in our numerical simulations of caustic crossings. The current DeltaE-distribution of RX J1131-1231 is sparsely sampled but further X-ray monitoring of RX J1131-1231 and other lensed quasars will provide improved constraints on the inclination angles, ISCO radii and spins of the black holes of distant quasars.
  • A Weyl semimetal possesses spin-polarized band-crossings, called Weyl nodes, connected by topological surface arcs. The low-energy excitations near the crossing points behave the same as massless Weyl fermions, leading to exotic properties like chiral anomaly. To have the transport properties dominated by Weyl fermions, Weyl nodes need to locate nearly at the chemical potential and enclosed by pairs of individual Fermi surfaces with nonzero Fermi Chern numbers. Combining angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and first-principles calculation, here we show that TaP is a Weyl semimetal with only single type of Weyl fermions, topologically distinguished from TaAs where two types of Weyl fermions contribute to the low-energy physical properties. The simple Weyl fermions in TaP are not only of fundamental interests but also of great potential for future applications. Fermi arcs on the Ta-terminated surface are observed, which appear in a different pattern from that on the As-termination in TaAs and NbAs.
  • Two-dimensional (2D) topological insulators (TIs) with a large bulk band-gap are promising for experimental studies of the quantum spin Hall effect and for spintronic device applications. Despite considerable theoretical efforts in predicting large-gap 2D TI candidates, only few of them have been experimentally verified. Here, by combining scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, we reveal that the top monolayer of ZrTe5 crystals hosts a large band gap of ~100 meV on the surface and a finite constant density-of-states within the gap at the step edge. Our first-principles calculations confirm the topologically nontrivial nature of the edge states. These results demonstrate that the top monolayer of ZrTe5 crystals is a large-gap 2D TI suitable for topotronic applications at high temperature.
  • We demonstrate an efficient core-shell GaAs/AlGaAs nanowire photodetector operating at room temperature. The design of this nanoscale detector is based on a type-I heterostructure combined with a metal-semiconductor-metal (MSM) radial architecture, in which built-in electric fields at the semiconductor heterointerface and at the metal/semiconductor Schottky contact promote photogenerated charge separation, enhancing photosensitivity. The spectral photoconductive response shows that the nanowire supports resonant optical modes in the near-infrared region, which lead to large photocurrent density in agreement with the predictions of electromagnetic and transport computational models. The single nanowire photodetector shows remarkable peak photoresponsivity of 0.57 A/W, comparable to large-area planar GaAs photodetectors on the market, and a high detectivity of 7.2 10^10 cm\sqrt{Hz}/W at {\lambda}=855 nm. This is promising for the design of a new generation of highly sensitive single nanowire photodetectors by controlling optical mode confinement, bandgap, density of states, and electrode engineering.
  • There is a long-standing confusion concerning the physical origin of the anomalous resistivity peak in transition metal pentatelluride HfTe5. Several mechanisms, like the formation of charge density wave or polaron, have been proposed, but so far no conclusive evidence has been presented. In this work, we investigate the unusual temperature dependence of magneto-transport properties in HfTe5. We find that a three dimensional topological Dirac semimetal state emerges only at around Tp (at which the resistivity shows a pronounced peak), as manifested by a large negative magnetoresistance. This accidental Dirac semimetal state mediates the topological quantum phase transition between the two distinct weak and strong topological insulator phases in HfTe5. Our work not only provides the first evidence of a temperature-induced critical topological phase transition in HfTe5, but also gives a reasonable explanation on the long-lasting question.
  • We present late-time Hubble and Spitzer Space Telescope imaging of SN 2008S and NGC 300 2008OT-1, the prototypes of a common class of stellar transients whose true nature is debated. Both objects are still fading and are now >15 times fainter than the progenitors in the mid-IR and are undetected in the optical and near-IR. Data from the Large Binocular Telescope and Magellan show that neither source has been variable in the optical since fading in 2010. We present models of surviving sources obscured by dusty shells or winds and find that extreme dust models are needed for surviving stars to be successfully hidden by dust. Explaining these transients as supernovae explosions, such as the electron capture supernovae believed to be associated with extreme AGB stars, seems an equally viable solution. Though SN 2008S is not detected in Chandra X-Ray Observatory data taken in 2012, the flux limits allow the fading IR source to be powered solely by the shock interaction of ejecta with the circumstellar medium if the shock velocity at the time of the observation was >20% slower than estimated from emission line widths while the transient was still optically bright. Continued SST monitoring and 10-20 micron observations with JWST can resolve any remaining ambiguities.
  • We have investigated the spin texture of surface Fermi arcs in the recently discovered Weyl semimetal TaAs using spin- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. The experimental results demonstrate that the Fermi arcs are spin-polarized. The measured spin texture fulfills the requirement of mirror and time reversal symmetries and is well reproduced by our first-principles calculations, which gives strong evidence for the topologically nontrivial Weyl semimetal state in TaAs. The consistency between the experimental and calculated results further confirms the distribution of chirality of the Weyl nodes determined by first-principles calculations.
  • In 1929, H. Weyl proposed that the massless solution of Dirac equation represents a pair of new type particles, the so-called Weyl fermions [1]. However the existence of them in particle physics remains elusive for more than eight decades. Recently, significant advances in both topological insulators and topological semimetals have provided an alternative way to realize Weyl fermions in condensed matter as an emergent phenomenon: when two non-degenerate bands in the three-dimensional momentum space cross in the vicinity of Fermi energy (called as Weyl nodes), the low energy excitation behaves exactly the same as Weyl fermions. Here, by performing soft x-ray angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy measurements which mainly probe bulk band structure, we directly observe the long-sought-after Weyl nodes for the first time in TaAs, whose projected locations on the (001) surface match well to the Fermi arcs, providing undisputable experimental evidence of existence of Weyl fermion quasiparticles in TaAs.
  • Weyl semimetals are a class of materials that can be regarded as three-dimensional analogs of graphene breaking time reversal or inversion symmetry. Electrons in a Weyl semimetal behave as Weyl fermions, which have many exotic properties, such as chiral anomaly and magnetic monopoles in the crystal momentum space. The surface state of a Weyl semimetal displays pairs of entangled Fermi arcs at two opposite surfaces. However, the existence of Weyl semimetals has not yet been proved experimentally. Here we report the experimental realization of a Weyl semimetal in TaAs by observing Fermi arcs formed by its surface states using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. Our first-principles calculations, matching remarkably well with the experimental results, further confirm that TaAs is a Weyl semimetal.
  • We analyze the optical, UV, and X-ray microlensing variability of the lensed quasar SDSS J0924+0219 using six epochs of Chandra data in two energy bands (spanning 0.4-8.0 keV, or 1-20 keV in the quasar rest frame), 10 epochs of F275W (rest-frame 1089A) Hubble Space Telescope data, and high-cadence R-band (rest-frame 2770A) monitoring spanning eleven years. Our joint analysis provides robust constraints on the extent of the X-ray continuum emission region and the projected area of the accretion disk. The best-fit half-light radius of the soft X-ray continuum emission region is between 5x10^13 and 10^15 cm, and we find an upper limit of 10^15 cm for the hard X-rays. The best-fit soft-band size is about 13 times smaller than the optical size, and roughly 7 GM_BH/c^2 for a 2.8x10^8 M_sol black hole, similar to the results for other systems. We find that the UV emitting region falls in between the optical and X-ray emitting regions at 10^14 cm < r_1/2,UV < 3x10^15 cm. Finally, the optical size is significantly larger, by 1.5*sigma, than the theoretical thin-disk estimate based on the observed, magnification-corrected I-band flux, suggesting a shallower temperature profile than expected for a standard disk.
  • The concept of a topological Kondo insulator (TKI) has been brought forward as a new class of topological insulators in which non-trivial surface states reside in the bulk Kondo band gap at low temperature due to the strong spin-orbit coupling [1-3]. In contrast to other three-dimensional (3D) topological insulators (e.g. Bi2Se3), a TKI is truly insulating in the bulk [4]. Furthermore, strong electron correlations are present in the system, which may interact with the novel topological phase. Applying spin- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (SARPES) to the Kondo insulator SmB6, a promising TKI candidate, we reveal that the surface states of SmB6 are spin polarized, and the spin is locked to the crystal momentum. Counter-propagating states (i.e. at k and -k) have opposite spin polarizations protected by time-reversal symmetry. Together with the odd number of Fermi surfaces of surface states between the 4 time-reversal invariant momenta in the surface Brillouin zone [5], these findings prove, for the first time, that SmB6 can host non-trivial topological surface states in a full insulating gap in the bulk stemming from the Kondo effect. Hence our experimental results establish that SmB6 is the first realization of a 3D TKI. It can also serve as an ideal platform for the systematic study of the interplay between novel topological quantum states with emergent effects and competing order induced by strongly correlated electrons.
  • Comprehensive studies of the electronic states of Ir 5d and Te 5p have been performed to elucidate the origin of the structural phase transition in IrTe2 by combining angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and resonant inelastic X-ray scattering. While no considerable changes are observed in the configuration of the Ir 5d electronic states across the transition, indicating that the Ir 5d orbitals are not involved in the transition, we reveal a van Hove singularity at the Fermi level (EF) related to the Te px+py orbitals, which is removed from EF at low temperatures. The wavevector connecting the adjacent saddle points is consistent with the in-plane projection of the superstructure modulation wavevector. These results can be qualitatively understood with the Rice-Scott "saddle-point" mechanism, while effects of the lattice distortions need to be additionally involved.
  • Three-dimensional (3D) topological Dirac semimetals (TDSs) represent a novel state of quantum matter that can be viewed as '3D graphene'. In contrast to two-dimensional (2D) Dirac fermions in graphene or on the surface of 3D topological insulators, TDSs possess 3D Dirac fermions in the bulk. The TDS is also an important boundary state mediating numerous novel quantum states, such as topological insulators, Weyl semi-metals, Axion insulators and topological superconductors. By investigating the electronic structure of Na3Bi with angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy, we discovered 3D Dirac fermions with linear dispersions along all momentum directions for the first time. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the 3D Dirac fermions in Na3Bi were protected by the bulk crystal symmetry. Our results establish that Na3Bi is the first model system of 3D TDSs, which can also serve as an ideal platform for the systematic study of quantum phase transitions between rich novel topological quantum states.
  • B. Aharmim, S. N. Ahmed, A. E. Anthony, N. Barros, E. W. Beier, A. Bellerive, B. Beltran, M. Bergevin, S. D. Biller, K. Boudjemline, M. G. Boulay, B. Cai, Y. D. Chan, D. Chauhan, M. Chen, B. T. Cleveland, G. A. Cox, X. Dai, H. Deng, J. A. Detwiler, M. DiMarco, M. D. Diamond, P. J. Doe, G. Doucas, P.-L. Drouin, F. A. Duncan, M. Dunford, E. D. Earle, S. R. Elliott, H. C. Evans, G. T. Ewan, J. Farine, H. Fergani, F. Fleurot, R. J. Ford, J. A. Formaggio, N. Gagnon, J. TM. Goon, K. Graham, E. Guillian, S. Habib, R. L. Hahn, A. L. Hallin, E. D. Hallman, P. J. Harvey, R. Hazama, W. J. Heintzelman, J. Heise, R. L. Helmer, A. Hime, C. Howard, M. Huang, P. Jagam, B. Jamieson, N. A. Jelley, M. Jerkins, K. J. Keeter, J. R. Klein, L. L. Kormos, M. Kos, C. Kraus, C. B. Krauss, A. Krueger, T. Kutter, C. C. M. Kyba, R. Lange, J. Law, I. T. Lawson, K. T. Lesko, J. R. Leslie, I. Levine, J. C. Loach, R. MacLellan, S. Majerus, H. B. Mak, J. Maneira, R. Martin, N. McCauley, A. B. McDonald, S. R. McGee, M. L. Miller, B. Monreal, J. Monroe, B. G. Nickel, A. J. Noble, H. M. O'Keeffe, N. S. Oblath, R. W. Ollerhead, G. D. Orebi Gann, S. M. Oser, R. A. Ott, S. J. M. Peeters, A. W. P. Poon, G. Prior, S. D. Reitzner, K. Rielage, B. C. Robertson, R. G. H. Robertson, M. H. Schwendener, J. A. Secrest, S. R. Seibert, O. Simard, J. J. Simpson, D. Sinclair, P. Skensved, T. J. Sonley, L. C. Stonehill, G. Tesic, N. Tolich, T. Tsui, R. Van Berg, B. A. VanDevender, C. J. Virtue, B. L. Wall, D. Waller, H. Wan Chan Tseung, D. L. Wark, P. J. S. Watson, J. Wendland, N. West, J. F. Wilkerson, J. R. Wilson, J. M. Wouters, A. Wright, M. Yeh, F. Zhang, K. Zuber
    Sept. 4, 2013 nucl-ex, astro-ph.SR
    The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) has confirmed the standard solar model and neutrino oscillations through the observation of neutrinos from the solar core. In this paper we present a search for neutrinos associated with sources other than the solar core, such as gamma-ray bursters and solar flares. We present a new method for looking for temporal coincidences between neutrino events and astrophysical bursts of widely varying intensity. No correlations were found between neutrinos detected in SNO and such astrophysical sources.
  • We report that the finite thickness of three-dimensional topological insulator (TI) thin films produces an observable magnetoresistance (MR) in phase coherent transport in parallel magnetic fields. The MR data of Bi2Se3 and (Bi,Sb)2Te3 thin films are compared with existing theoretical models of parallel field magnetotransport. We conclude that the TI thin films bring parallel field transport into a unique regime in which the coupling of surface states to bulk and to opposite surfaces is indispensable for understanding the observed MR. The {\beta} parameter extracted from parallel field MR can in principle provide a figure of merit for searching TI compounds with more insulating bulk than existing materials.
  • Topological superconductivity is one of most fascinating properties of topological quantum matters that was theoretically proposed and can support Majorana Fermions at the edge state. Superconductivity was previously realized in a Cu-intercalated Bi2Se3 topological compound or a Bi2Te3 topological compound at high pressure. Here we report the discovery of superconductivity in the topological compound Sb2Te3 when pressure was applied. The crystal structure analysis results reveal that superconductivity at a low-pressure range occurs at the ambient phase. The Hall coefficient measurements indicate the change of p-type carriers at a low-pressure range within the ambient phase, into n-type at higher pressures, showing intimate relation to superconducting transition temperature. The first principle calculations based on experimental measurements of the crystal lattice show that Sb2Te3 retains its Dirac surface states within the low-pressure ambient phase where superconductivity was observed, which indicates a strong relationship between superconductivity and topology nature.
  • We use gravitational microlensing to determine the size of the X-ray and optical emission regions of the quadruple lens system Q 2237+0305. The optical half-light radius, log(R_{1/2,V}/cm)=16.41\pm0.18 (at lambda_{rest}=2018 \AA), is significantly larger than the observed soft, log(R_{1/2,soft}/cm)=15.76^{+0.41}_{-0.34} (1.1-3.5 keV in the rest frame), and hard, log(R_{1/2,hard}/cm)=15.46^{+0.34}_{-0.29} (3.5-21.5 keV in the rest frame), band X-ray emission. There is a weak evidence that the hard component is more compact than the soft, with log(R_{1/2,soft}/R_{1/2,hard}) \sim 0.30^{+0.53}_{-0.45}. This wavelength-dependent structure agrees with recent results found in other lens systems using microlensing techniques, and favors geometries in which the corona is concentrated near the inner edge of the accretion disk. While the available measurements are limited, the size of the X-ray emission region appears to be roughly proportional to the mass of the central black hole.