• Recently, DeLaunay et al. (2016) discovered a gamma-ray transient, Swift J0644.5-5111, associated with the fast radio burst (FRB) 131104. They also reported follow-up broadband observations beginning two days after the FRB and provided upper limits on a putative afterglow of this transient. In this paper, we show that if such a transient drives a relativistic shock as in a cosmological gamma-ray burst (GRB), these upper limits are consistent with an environment of which density is much less than that of an interstellar medium but typical for the outskirts' density of a galaxy when the typical values of three microphysical parameters of the shock are taken. This appears to be inconsistent with the catastrophic event models in which the central engine of Swift J0644.5-5111 is surrounded by an interstellar medium, but together with the properties of the gamma-ray transient, favors the binary neutron star merger origin. We further constrain the physical parameters of the postmerger object by assuming that Swift J0644.5-5111 results from internal dissipation of a spinning-down pulsar wind, and we find that the postmerger object is an ultra-strongly magnetized, very rapidly rotating pulsar. This merger event should have given birth to a gravitational wave burst, an FRB, and a short GRB or an extended X-ray/gamma-ray emission if a relativistic jet of the GRB is missed. Such "triplets" would be testable in the near future with the advanced LIGO and Virgo gravitational-wave observatories.
  • Almost all superluminous supernovae (SLSNe) whose peak magnitudes are $\lesssim -21$ mag can be explained by the $^{56}$Ni-powered model, magnetar-powered (highly magnetized pulsar) model or ejecta-circumstellar medium (CSM) interaction model. Recently, iPTF13ehe challenges these energy-source models, because the spectral analysis shows that $\sim 2.5M_\odot$ of $^{56}$Ni have been synthesized but are inadequate to power the peak bolometric emission of iPTF13ehe, while the rebrightening of the late-time light-curve (LC) and the H$\alpha$ emission lines indicate that the ejecta-CSM interaction must play a key role in powering the late-time LC. Here we propose a triple-energy-source model, in which a magnetar together with some amount ($\lesssim 2.5M_\odot$) of $^{56}$Ni may power the early LC of iPTF13ehe while the late-time rebrightening can be quantitatively explained by an ejecta-CSM interaction. Furthermore, we suggest that iPTF13ehe is a genuine core-collapse supernova rather than a pulsational pair-instability supernova candidate. Further studies on similar SLSNe in the future would eventually shed light on their explosion and energy-source mechanisms.
  • Very recently Spitler et al. (2016) and Scholz et al. (2016) reported their detections of sixteen additional bright bursts from the direction of the fast radio burst (FRB) 121102. This repeating FRB is inconsistent with all the catastrophic event models put forward previously for hypothetically non-repeating FRBs. Here we propose a different model, in which highly magnetized pulsars travel through asteroid belts of other stars. We show that a repeating FRB could originate from such a pulsar encountering lots of asteroids in the belt. During each pulsar-asteroid impact, an electric field induced outside the asteroid has such a large component parallel to the stellar magnetic field that electrons are torn off the asteroidal surface and accelerated to ultra-relativistic energies instantaneously. Subsequent movement of these electrons along magnetic field lines will cause coherent curvature radiation, which can account for all the properties of an FRB. In addition, this model can self-consistently explain the typical duration, luminosity, and repetitive rate of the seventeen bursts of FRB 121102. The predicted occurrence rate of repeating FRB sources may imply that our model would be testable in the next few years.
  • Optical re-brightenings in the afterglows of some gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are unexpected within the framework of the simple external shock model. While it has been suggested that the central engines of some GRBs are newly born magnetars, we aim to relate the behaviors of magnetars to the optical re-brightenings. A newly born magnetar will lose its rotational energy in the form of Poynting-flux, which may be converted into a wind of electron-positron pairs through some magnetic dissipation processes. As proposed by Dai (2004), this wind will catch up with the GRB outflow and a long-lasting reverse shock would form. By applying this scenario to GRB afterglows, we find that the reverse shock propagating back into the electron-positron wind can lead to an observable optical re-brightening and a simultaneous X-ray plateau (or X-ray shallow decay). In our study, we select four GRBs, i.e., GRB 080413B, GRB 090426, GRB 091029, and GRB 100814A, of which the optical afterglows are well observed and show clear re-brightenings. We find that they can be well interpreted. In our scenario, the spin-down timescale of the magnetar should be slightly smaller than the peak time of the re-brightening, which can provide a clue to the characteristics of the magnetar.
  • The shallow decay phase and flares in the afterglows of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) is widely believed to be associated with the later activation of central engine. Some models of energy injection involve with a continuous energy flow since the GRB trigger time, such as the magnetic dipole radiation from a magnetar. However, in the scenario involving with a black hole accretion system, the energy flow from the fall-back accretion may be delayed for a fall-back time $\sim t_{\rm fb}$. Thus we propose a delayed energy injection model, the delayed energy would cause a notable rise to the Lorentz factor of the external shock, which will "generate" a bump in the multiple band afterglows. If the delayed time is very short, our model degenerates to the previous models. Our model can well explain the significant re-brightening in the optical and infrared light curves of GRB 081029 and GRB 100621A. A considerable fall-back mass is needed to provide the later energy, this indicates GRBs accompanied with fall-back material may be associated with a low energy supernova so that fraction of the envelope can be survived during eruption. The fall-back time can give meaningful information of the properties of GRB progenitor stars.
  • Millisecond magnetars can be formed via several channels: core-collapse of massive stars, accretion-induced collapse of white dwarfs (WDs), double WD mergers, double neutron star (NS) mergers, and WD-NS mergers. Because the mass of ejecta from these channels could be quite different, their light curves are also expected to be diverse. We evaluate the dynamic evolution of optical transients powered by millisecond magnetars. We find that the magnetar with short spin-down timescale converts its rotational energy mostly into the kinetic energy of the transient, while the energy of a magnetar with long spin-down timescale goes into radiation of the transient. This leads us to speculate that hypernovae could be powered by magnetars with short spin-down timescales. At late times the optical transients will gradually evolve into a nebular phase because of the photospheric recession. We treat the photosphere and nebula separately because their radiation mechanisms are different. In some cases the ejecta could be light enough that the magnetar can accelerate it to a relativistic speed. It is well known that the peak luminosity of a supernova (SN) occurs when the luminosity is equal to the instantaneous energy input rate, as shown by Arnett (1979). We show that photospheric recession and relativistic motion can modify this law. The photospheric recession always leads to a delay of the peak time $t_{\mathrm{pk}}$ relative to the time $t_{\times }$ at which the SN luminosity equals the instantaneous energy input rate. Relativistic motion, however, may change this result significantly.
  • There is growing evidence that a stable magnetar could be formed from the coalescence of double neutron stars. In previous papers, we investigated the signature of formation of stable millisecond magnetars in radio and optical/ultraviolet bands by assuming that the central rapidly rotating magnetar deposits its rotational energy in the form of a relativistic leptonized wind. We found that the optical transient PTF11agg could be the first evidence for the formation of post-merger millisecond magnetars. To enhance the probability of finding more evidence for the post-merger magnetar formation, it is better to extend the observational channel to other photon energy bands. In this paper we propose to search the signature of post-merger magnetar formation in X-ray and especially gamma-ray bands. We calculate the SSC emission of the reverse shock powered by post-merger millisecond magnetars. We find that the SSC component peaks at $1\,{\rm GeV}$ in the spectral energy distribution and extends to $\gtrsim 10\,{\rm TeV}$ for typical parameters. These energy bands are quite suitable for Fermi/LAT and CTA, which, with their current observational sensitivities, can detect the SSC emission powered by post-merger magnetars up to $1\,{\rm Gpc}$. NuSTAR, sensible in X-ray bands, can detect the formation of post-merger millisecond magnetars at redshift $z\sim 1$. Future improvement in sensitivity of CTA can also probe the birth of post-merger millisecond magnetars at redshift $z\sim 1$. However, because of the $\gamma$-$\gamma$ collisions, strong high-energy emission is clearly predicted only for ejecta masses lower than $10^{-3}M_\odot$.
  • Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are short and intense flashes at the cosmological distances, which are the most luminous explosions in the Universe. The high luminosities of GRBs make them detectable out to the edge of the visible universe. So, they are unique tools to probe the properties of high-redshift universe: including the cosmic expansion and dark energy, star formation rate, the reionization epoch and the metal evolution of the Universe. First, they can be used to constrain the history of cosmic acceleration and the evolution of dark energy in a redshift range hardly achievable by other cosmological probes. Second, long GRBs are believed to be formed by collapse of massive stars. So they can be used to derive the high-redshift star formation rate, which can not be probed by current observations. Moreover, the use of GRBs as cosmological tools could unveil the reionization history and metal evolution of the Universe, the intergalactic medium (IGM) properties and the nature of first stars in the early universe. But beyond that, the GRB high-energy photons can be applied to constrain Lorentz invariance violation (LIV) and to test Einstein's Equivalence Principle (EEP). In this paper, we review the progress on the GRB cosmology and fundamental physics probed by GRBs.
  • Most type-Ic core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe) produce $^{56}$Ni and neutron stars (NSs) or black holes (BHs). The dipole radiation of nascent NSs has usually been neglected in explaining supernovae (SNe) with peak absolute magnitude $M_{\rm peak}$ in any band are $\gtrsim -19.5$~mag, while the $^{56}$Ni can be neglected in fitting most type-Ic superluminous supernovae (SLSNe Ic) whose $M_{\rm peak}$ in any band are $\lesssim -21$~mag, since the luminosity from a magnetar (highly magnetized NS) can outshine that from a moderate amount of $^{56}$Ni. For luminous SNe Ic with $-21 \lesssim M_{\rm peak}\lesssim -19.5$~mag, however, both contributions from $^{56}$Ni and NSs cannot be neglected without serious modeling, since they are not SLSNe and the $^{56}$Ni mass could be up to $\sim 0.5 M_{\odot}$. In this paper we propose a unified model that contain contributions from both $^{56}$Ni and a nascent NS. We select three luminous SNe Ic-BL, SN~2010ay, SN~2006nx, and SN~14475, and show that, if these SNe are powered by $^{56}$Ni, the ratio of $M_{\rm Ni}$ to $M_{\rm ej}$ are unrealistic. Alternatively, we invoke the magnetar model and the hybrid ($^{56}$Ni + NS) model and find that they can fit the observations, indicating that our models are valid and necessary for luminous SNe Ic. Owing to the lack of late-time photometric data, we cannot break the parameter degeneracy and thus distinguish among the model parameters, but we can expect that future multi-epoch observations of luminous SNe can provide stringent constraints on $^{56}$Ni yields and the parameters of putative magnetars.
  • In recent years, more and more gamma-ray bursts with late rebrightenings in multi-band afterglows unveil the late-time activities of the central engines. GRB 100814A is a special one among the well-sampled events, with complex temporal and spectral evolution. The single power-law shallow decay index of the optical light curve observed by GROND between 640 s and 10 ks is $\alpha_{\rm opt} = 0.57 \pm 0.02$, which apparently conflicts with the simple external shock model expectation. Especially, there is a remarkable rebrightening in the optical to near infrared bands at late time, challenging the external shock model with synchrotron emission coming from the interaction of the blast wave with the surrounding interstellar medium. In this paper, we invoke a magnetar with spin evolution to explain the complex multi-band afterglow emission of GRB 100814A. The initial shallow decay phase in optical bands and the plateau in X-ray can be explained as due to energy injection from a spin-down magnetar. At late time, with the falling of materials from the fall-back disk onto the central object of the burster, angular momentum of the accreted materials is transferred to the magnetar, which leads to a spin-up process. As a result, the magnetic dipole radiation luminosity will increase, resulting in the significant rebrightening of the optical afterglow. It is shown that the observed multi-band afterglow emission can be well reproduced by the model.
  • Recently, researches performed by two groups have revealed that the magnetar spin-down energy injection model with full energy trapping can explain the early-time light curves of SN 2010gx, SN 2013dg, LSQ12dlf, SSS120810 and CSS121015, but fails to fit the late-time light curves of these Superluminous Supernovae (SLSNe). These results imply that the original magnetar-powered model is challenged in explaining these SLSNe. Our paper aims to simultaneously explain both the early- and late-time data/upper limits by considering the leakage of hard emissions. We incorporate quantitatively the leakage effect into the original magnetar-powered model and derive a new semi-analytical equation. Comparing the light curves reproduced by our revised magnetar-powered model to the observed data and/or upper limits of these five SLSNe, we found that the late-time light curves reproduced by our semi-analytical equation are in good agreement with the late-time observed data and/or upper limits of SN 2010gx, CSS121015, SN 2013dg and LSQ12dlf and the late-time excess of SSS120810, indicating that the magnetar-powered model might be responsible for these SLSNe and that the gamma ray and X-ray leakage are unavoidable when the hard photons were down-Comptonized to softer photons. To determine the details of the leakage effect and unveil the nature of SLSNe, more high quality bolometric light curves and spectra of SLSNe are required.
  • We present the optical luminosity function (LF) of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) estimated from a uniform sample of 58 GRBs from observations with the Robotic Optical Transient Search Experiment III (ROTSE-III). Our GRB sample is divided into two sub-samples: detected afterglows (18 GRBs), and those with upper limits (40 GRBs). The $R$ band fluxes 100s after the onset of the burst for these two sub-samples are derived. The optical LFs at 100s are fitted by assuming that the co-moving GRB rate traces the star-formation rate. The detection function of ROTSE-III is taken into account during the fitting of the optical LFs by using Monte Carlo simulations. We find that the cumulative distribution of optical emission at 100s is well-described with an exponential rise and power-law decay (ERPLD), broken power-law (BPL), and Schechter LFs. A single power-law (SPL) LF, on the other hand, is ruled out with high confidence.
  • Re-brightening bumps are frequently observed in gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglows. Many scenarios have been proposed to interpret the origin of these bumps, of which a blast wave encountering a density-jump in the circumburst environment has been questioned by recent works. We develop a set of differential equations to calculate the relativistic outflow encountering the density-jump by extending the work of Huang et al. (1999). This approach is a semi-analytic method and is very convenient. Our results show that late high-amplitude bumps can not be produced under common conditions, only short plateau may emerge even when the encounter occurs at early time ($< 10^4$ s). In general, our results disfavor the density-jump origin for those observed bumps, which is consistent with the conclusion drawn from full hydrodynamics studies. The bumps thus should be due to other scenarios.
  • GRB 120326A is an unusual gamma-ray burst (GRB) which has a quite long plateau and a very late rebrightening both in X-ray and optical bands. The similar behavior of the optical and X-ray light curves suggests that they maybe have a common origin. The long plateau starts from several hundred seconds and ends at tens of thousands seconds. The peak time of the late rebrightening is about 30000 s. We analyze the energy injection model by means of numerical and analytical solutions, considering both the wind environment and ISM environment for GRB afterglows. We especially study the influence of the injection starting time, ending time, stellar wind density (or density of the circumburst environment), and injection luminosity on the shape of the afterglow light curves, respectively. We find that the light curve is largely affected by the parameters in the wind model. There is a "bump" at the late time only in the wind model too. In the wind case, it is interesting that the longer the energy injected, the more obvious the rebrightening will be. We also find the peak time of bump is determined by the stellar wind density. We use the late continuous injection model to interpret the unusual afterglow of GRB 120326A. The model can well fit the observational data, however, we find that the time scale of the injection must be larger than ten thousands seconds. This implies that the time scale of the central engine activity must be more than ten thousands seconds. This can give useful constraints on the central engine of GRBs. We consider a new born millisecond pulsar with strong magnetic field as the central engine. On the other hand, our results suggest that the circumburst environment of GRB 120326A is very likely a stellar wind.
  • Many long-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) were observed by {\it Swift}/XRT to have plateaus in their X-ray afterglow light curves. This plateau phase has been argued to be evidence for long-lasting activity of magnetar (ultra-strongly magnetized neutron stars) central engines. However, the emission efficiency of such magnetars in X-rays is still unknown. Here we collect 24 long GRB X-ray afterglows showing plateaus followed by steep decays. We extend the well-known relationship between the X-ray luminosity ${L_{\mathrm{X}}}$ and spin-down luminosity $L_{\mathrm{sd}}$ of pulsars to magnetar central engines, and find that the initial rotation period $P_{0}$ ranges from 1 ms to 10 ms and that the dipole magnetic field $B$ is centered around $10^{15}$ G. These constraints not only favor the suggestion that the central engines of some long GRBs are very likely to be rapidly rotating magnetars but also indicate that the magnetar plateau emission efficiency in X-rays is close to 100%.
  • We present a comprehensive analysis of a bright, long duration (T90 ~ 257 s) GRB 110205A at redshift z= 2.22. The optical prompt emission was detected by Swift/UVOT, ROTSE-IIIb and BOOTES telescopes when the GRB was still radiating in the gamma-ray band. Nearly 200 s of observations were obtained simultaneously from optical, X-ray to gamma-ray, which makes it one of the exceptional cases to study the broadband spectral energy distribution across 6 orders of magnitude in energy during the prompt emission phase. By fitting the time resolved prompt spectra, we clearly identify, for the first time, an interesting two-break energy spectrum, roughly consistent with the standard GRB synchrotron emission model in the fast cooling regime. Although the prompt optical emission is brighter than the extrapolation of the best fit X/gamma-ray spectra, it traces the gamma-ray light curve shape, suggesting a relation to the prompt high energy emission. The synchrotron + SSC scenario is disfavored by the data, but the models invoking a pair of internal shocks or having two emission regions can interpret the data well. Shortly after prompt emission (~ 1100 s), a bright (R = 14.0) optical emission hump with very steep rise (alpha ~ 5.5) was observed which we interpret as the emission from the reverse shock. It is the first time that the rising phase of a reverse shock component has been closely observed. The full optical and X-ray afterglow lightcurves can be interpreted within the standard reverse shock (RS) + forward shock (FS) model. In general, the high quality prompt emission and afterglow data allow us to apply the standard fireball shock model to extract valuable information about the GRB including the radiation mechanism, radius of prompt emission R, initial Lorentz factor of the outflow, the composition of the ejecta, as well as the collimation angle and the total energy budget.
  • Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) serve as powerful probes of the early Universe, with their luminous afterglows revealing the locations and physical properties of star forming galaxies at the highest redshifts, and potentially locating first generation (Population III) stars. Since GRB afterglows have intrinsically very simple spectra, they allow robust redshifts from low signal to noise spectroscopy, or photometry. Here we present a photometric redshift of z~9.4 for the Swift-detected GRB 090429B based on deep observations with Gemini-North, the Very Large Telescope, and the GRB Optical and Near-infrared Detector. Assuming a Small Magellanic Cloud dust law (which has been found in a majority of GRB sight-lines), the 90% likelihood range for the redshift is 9.06 < z < 9.52, although there is a low-probability tail to somewhat lower redshifts. Adopting Milky Way or Large Magellanic Cloud dust laws leads to very similar conclusions, while a Maiolino law does allow somewhat lower redshift solutions, but in all cases the most likely redshift is found to be z>7. The non-detection of the host galaxy to deep limits (Y_AB >~ 28 mag, which would correspond roughly to 0.001 L* at z=1) in our late time optical and infrared observations with the Hubble Space Telescope strongly supports the extreme redshift origin of GRB 090429B, since we would expect to have detected any low-z galaxy, even if it were highly dusty. Finally, the energetics of GRB 090429B are comparable to those of other GRBs, and suggest that its progenitor is not greatly different to those of lower redshift bursts.
  • Gamma-ray bursts have been proved to be detectable up to distances much larger than any other astrophysical object, providing the most effective way, complementary to ordinary surveys, to study the high redshift universe. To this end, we present here the results of an observational campaign devoted to the study of the high-z GRB 090205. We carried out optical/NIR spectroscopy and imaging of GRB 090205 with the ESO-VLT starting from hours after the event up to several days later to detect the host galaxy. We compared the results obtained from our optical/NIR observations with the available Swift high-energy data of this burst. Our observational campaign led to the detection of the optical afterglow and host galaxy of GRB 090205 and to the first measure of its redshift, z=4.65. Similar to other, recent high-z GRBs, GRB 090205 has a short duration in the rest-frame with T_{90,rf}=1.6 s, which suggests the possibility that it might belong to the short GRBs class. The X-ray afterglow of GRB 090205 shows a complex and interesting behaviour with a possible rebrightening at 500-1000s from the trigger time and late flaring activity. Photometric observations of the GRB 090205 host galaxy argue in favor of a starburst galaxy with a stellar population younger than ~ 150 Myr. Moreover, the metallicity of Z > 0.27 Z_Sun derived from the GRB afterglow spectrum is among the highest derived from GRB afterglow measurement at high-z, suggesting that the burst occurred in a rather enriched envirorment. Finally, a detailed analysis of the afterglow spectrum shows the existence of a line corresponding to Lyman-alpha emission at the redshift of the burst. GRB 090205 is thus hosted in a typical Lyman-alpha emitter (LAE) at z=4.65. This makes the GRB 090205 host the farthest GRB host galaxy, spectroscopically confirmed, detected to date.
  • Long duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) release copious amounts of energy across the entire electromagnetic spectrum, and so provide a window into the process of black hole formation from the collapse of a massive star. Over the last forty years, our understanding of the GRB phenomenon has progressed dramatically; nevertheless, fortuitous circumstances occasionally arise that provide access to a regime not yet probed. GRB 080319B presented such an opportunity, with extraordinarily bright prompt optical emission that peaked at a visual magnitude of 5.3, making it briefly visible with the naked eye. It was captured in exquisite detail by wide-field telescopes, imaging the burst location from before the time of the explosion. The combination of these unique optical data with simultaneous gamma-ray observations provides powerful diagnostics of the detailed physics of this explosion within seconds of its formation. Here we show that the prompt optical and gamma-ray emissions from this event likely arise from different spectral components within the same physical region located at a large distance from the source, implying an extremely relativistic outflow. The chromatic behaviour of the broadband afterglow is consistent with viewing the GRB down the very narrow inner core of a two-component jet that is expanding into a wind-like environment consistent with the massive star origin of long GRBs. These circumstances can explain the extreme properties of this GRB.
  • By neglecting sideways expansion of gamma-ray burst (GRB) jets and assuming their half-opening angle distribution, we estimate the detectability of orphan optical afterglows. This estimation is carried out by calculating the durations of off-axis optical afterglows whose flux density exceeds a certain observational limit. We show that the former assumption leads to more detectable orphans, while the latter suppresses the detectability strongly compared with the model with half-opening angle $\theta_j=0.1$. We also considered the effects of other parameters, and find that the effects of the ejecta energy $E_j$ and post-jet-break temporal index $-\alpha_2$ are important but that the effects of the electron-energy distribution index $p$, electron energy equipartition factor $\epsilon_e$, and environment density $n$ are insignificant. If $E_j$ and $\alpha_2$ are determined by other methods, one can constrain the half-opening angle distribution of jets by observing orphan afterglows. Adopting a set of "standard" parameters, the detectable rate of orphan afterglows is about $1.3\times 10^{-2} {deg}^{-2} {yr}^{-1}$, if the observed limiting magnitude is 20 in R-band.
  • Recent observations support the suggestion that short-duration gamma-ray bursts are produced by compact star mergers. The X-ray flares discovered in two short gamma-ray bursts last much longer than the previously proposed postmerger energy release time scales. Here we show that they can be produced by differentially rotating, millisecond pulsars after the mergers of binary neutron stars. The differential rotation leads to windup of interior poloidal magnetic fields and the resulting toroidal fields are strong enough to float up and break through the stellar surface. Magnetic reconnection--driven explosive events then occur, leading to multiple X-ray flares minutes after the original gamma-ray burst.
  • We analyze several recently detected gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with late X-ray flares in the context of late internal shock and late external shock models. We find that the X-ray flares in GRB 050421 and GRB 050502B originate from late internal shocks, while the main X-ray flares in GRB 050406 and GRB 050607 may arise from late external shocks. Under the assumption that the central engine has two periods of activities, we get four basic types of X-ray light curves. The classification of these types depends on which period of activities produces the prompt gamma-ray emission (Type 1 and Type 2: the earlier period; Type 3 and Type 4: the late period), and on whether the late ejecta catching up with the early ejecta happens earlier than the deceleration of the early ejecta (Type 1 and Type 3) or not (Type 2 and Type 4). We find that the X-ray flare caused by a late external shock is a special case of Type 1. Our analysis reveals that the X-ray light curves of GRBs 050406, 050421, and 050607 can be classified as Type 1, while the X-ray light curve of GRB 050502B is classified as Type 2. However, the X-ray light curve of GRB 050406 is also likely to be Type 2. We also predict a long-lag short-lived X-ray flare caused by the inner external shock, which forms when a low baryon-loading long-lag late ejecta decelerates in the non-relativistic tail of an outer external shock driven by an early ejecta.
  • When a cold shell sweeps up the ambient medium, a forward shock and a reverse shock will form. We analyze the reverse-forward shocks in a wind environment, including their dynamics and emission. An early afterglow is emitted from the shocked shell, e.g., an optical flash may emerge. The reverse shock behaves differently in two approximations: relativistic and Newtonian cases, which depend on the parameters, e.g., the initial Lorentz factor of the ejecta. If the initial Lorentz factor is much less than $114 E_{53}^{1/4} \Delta_{0,12}^{-1/4} A_{*,-1}^{-1/4}$, the early reverse shock is Newtonian. This may take place for the wider of a two-component jet, an orphan afterglow caused by a low initial Lorentz factor, and so on. The synchrotron self absorption effect is significant especially for the Newtonian reverse shock case, since the absorption frequency $\nu_a$ is larger than the cooling frequency $\nu_c$ and the minimum synchrotron frequency $\nu_m$ for typical parameters. For the optical to X-ray band, the flux is nearly unchanged with time during the early period, which may be a diagnostic for the low initial Lorentz factor of the ejecta in a wind environment. We also investigate the early light curves with different wind densities, and compare them with these in the ISM model.
  • We present a general method for testing gamma-ray burst (GRB) jet structure and carry out a comprehensive analysis about the prevalent jet structure models. According to the jet angular energy distribution, we can not only derive the expected distribution of the GRB isotropic-equivalent energy release for any possible jet structure, but also obtain a two-dimensional distribution including redshift z. By using the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test we compare the predicted distribution with the observed sample, and find that the power-law structured jet model is most consistent with the current sample and that the uniform jet model is also plausible. However, this conclusion is tentative because of the small size and the inhomogeneity of this sample. Future observations (e.g., Swift) will provide a larger and less biased sample for us to make a robust conclusion by using the procedure proposed in this paper.
  • The brightest giant flare from the soft $\gamma$-ray repeater (SGR) 1806-20 was detected on 2004 December 27. The isotropic-equivalent energy release of this burst is at least one order of magnitude more energetic than those of the two other SGR giant flares. Starting from about one week after the burst, a very bright ($\sim 80$ mJy), fading radio afterglow was detected. Follow-up observations revealed the multi-frequency light curves of the afterglow and the temporal evolution of the source size. Here we show that these observations can be understood in a two-component explosion model. In this model, one component is a relativistic collimated outflow responsible for the initial giant flare and the early afterglow, and another component is a subrelativistic wider outflow responsible for the late afterglow. We also discuss triggering mechanisms of these two components within the framework of the magnetar model.