• We measured the optical conductivity of superconducting single crystals of Ba$_{1-x}$K$_{x}$Fe$_{2}$As$_{2}$ with $x$ ranging from 0.40 (optimal doping, $T_c = 39$ K) down to 0.20 (underdoped, $T_c = 16$ K), where a magnetic order coexists with superconductivity. In the normal state, the low-frequency optical conductivity can be described by an incoherent broad Drude component and a coherent narrow Drude component: the broad one is doping-independent, while the narrow one shows strong scattering in the heavily underdoped compound. In the superconducting state, the formation of the condensate leads to a low-frequency suppression of the optical conductivity spectral weight. In the heavily underdoped region, the superfluid density is significantly suppressed, and the weight of unpaired carriers rapidly increases. We attribute these results to changes in the superconducting gap across the phase diagram, which could show a nodal-to-nodeless transition due to the strong interplay between magnetism and superconductivity in underdoped Ba$_{1-x}$K$_{x}$Fe$_{2}$As$_{2}$.
  • Strong coupling between discrete phonon and continuous electron-hole pair excitations can give rise to a pronounced asymmetry in the phonon line shape, known as the Fano resonance. This effect has been observed in a variety of systems, such as stripe-phase nickelates, graphene and high-$T_{c}$ superconductors. Here, we reveal explicit evidence for strong coupling between an infrared-active $A_1$ phonon and electronic transitions near the Weyl points (Weyl fermions) through the observation of a Fano resonance in the recently discovered Weyl semimetal TaAs. The resultant asymmetry in the phonon line shape, conspicuous at low temperatures, diminishes continuously as the temperature increases. This anomalous behavior originates from the suppression of the electronic transitions near the Weyl points due to the decreasing occupation of electronic states below the Fermi level ($E_{F}$) with increasing temperature, as well as Pauli blocking caused by thermally excited electrons above $E_{F}$. Our findings not only elucidate the underlying mechanism governing the tunable Fano resonance, but also open a new route for exploring exotic physical phenomena through the properties of phonons in Weyl semimetals.
  • In iron-based superconductors, a spin-density-wave (SDW) magnetic order is suppressed with doping and unconventional superconductivity appears in close proximity to the SDW instability. The optical response of the SDW order shows clear gap features: substantial suppression in the low-frequency optical conductivity, alongside a spectral weight transfer from low to high frequencies. Here, we study the detailed temperature dependence of the optical response in three different series of the Ba122 system [Ba$_{1-x}$K$_{x}$Fe$_{2}$As$_{2}$, Ba(Fe$_{1-x}$Co$_{x}$)$_{2}$As$_{2}$ and BaFe$_{2}$(As$_{1-x}$P$_{x}$)$_{2}$]. Intriguingly, we found that the suppression of the low-frequency optical conductivity and spectral weight transfer appear at a temperature $T^{\ast}$ much higher than the SDW transition temperature $T_{SDW}$. Since this behavior has the same optical feature and energy scale as the SDW order, we attribute it to SDW fluctuations. Furthermore, $T^{\ast}$ is suppressed with doping, closely following the doping dependence of the nematic fluctuations detected by other techniques. These results suggest that the magnetic and nematic orders have an intimate relationship, in favor of the magnetic-fluctuation-driven nematicity scenario in iron-based superconductors.
  • The magnetic properties of CaCo$_{2}$As$_{2}$ single crystal was systematically studied by using dc magnetization and magnetic torque measurements. A paramagnetic to antiferromagnetic transition occurs at $T_N$ = 74 K with Co spins being aligned parallel to the c axis. For $H \parallel c$, a field-induced spin-flop transition was observed below $T_N$ and a magnetic transition from antiferromagnetic to paramagnetic was inferred from the detailed analysis of magnetization and magnetic torque. Finally, we summarize the magnetic phase diagram of CaCo$_{2}$As$_{2}$ based on our results in the \emph{H-T} plane.
  • We present a systematic study of both the temperature and frequency dependence of the optical response in TaAs, a material that has recently been realized to host the Weyl semimetal state. Our study reveals that the optical conductivity of TaAs features a narrow Drude response alongside a conspicuous linear dependence on frequency. The width of the Drude peak decreases upon cooling, following a $T^{2}$ temperature dependence which is expected for Weyl semimetals. Two linear components with distinct slopes dominate the 5-K optical conductivity. A comparison between our experimental results and theoretical calculations suggests that the linear conductivity below $\sim$230~cm$^{-1}$ is a clear signature of the Weyl points lying in very close proximity to the Fermi energy.
  • A series of LiFe$_{1-x}$Co$_{x}$As compounds with different Co concentrations have been studied by transport, optical spectroscopy, angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and nuclear magnetic resonance. We observed a Fermi liquid to non-Fermi liquid to Fermi liquid (FL-NFL-FL) crossover alongside a monotonic suppression of the superconductivity with increasing Co content. In parallel to the FL-NFL-FL crossover, we found that both the low-energy spin fluctuations and Fermi surface nesting are enhanced and then diminished, strongly suggesting that the NFL behavior in LiFe$_{1-x}$Co$_{x}$As is induced by low-energy spin fluctuations which are very likely tuned by Fermi surface nesting. Our study reveals a unique phase diagram of LiFe$_{1-x}$Co$_{x}$As where the region of NFL is moved to the boundary of the superconducting phase, implying that they are probably governed by different mechanisms.
  • The effect of K, Co and P dopings on the lattice dynamics in the BaFe$_2$As$_2$ system is studied by infrared spectroscopy. We focus on the phonon at $\sim$ 253 cm$^{-1}$, the highest energy in-plane infrared-active Fe-As mode in BaFe$_2$As$_2$. Our studies show that the Co and P dopings lead to a blue shift of this phonon in frequency, which can be simply interpreted by the change of lattice parameters induced by doping. In sharp contrast, an unusual red shift of the same mode was observed in the K-doped compound, at odds with the above explanation. This anomalous behavior in K-doped BaFe$_2$As$_2$ is more likely associated with the coupling between lattice vibrations and other channels, such as charge or spin. This coupling scenario is also supported by the asymmetric line shape and intensity growth of the phonon in the K-doped compound.
  • We measured the in-plane optical conductivity of a nearly optimally doped (Ba,K)Fe2As2 single crystal with Tc = 39.1 K. Upon entering the superconducting state the optical conductivity below ~20 meV vanishes, strongly suggesting a fully gapped system. A BCS-like fit requires two different isotropic gaps to describe the optical response of this material. The temperature dependence of the gaps and the penetration depth suggest a strong interband coupling, but no impurity scattering induced pair breaking is present. This contrasts to the large residual conductivity observed in optimally doped Ba(Fe,Co)2As2 and strongly supports an s(+/-) gap symmetry for these compounds.
  • The optical properties of the superconducting single crystal Rb$_{0.8}$Fe$_{1.68}$Se$_2$ with $T_{c}$ $\simeq$ 31 K have been measured over a wide frequency range in the $ab$ plane. We found that the optical conductivity is dominated by a series of infrared-active phonon modes at low-frequency region as well as several other high-frequency bound excitations. The low-frequency optical conductivity has rather low value and shows quite small Drude-like response, indicating low carriers density in this material. Furthermore, the phonon modes increase continuously in frequency with decreasing temperature; specifically, the phonon mode around 200 cm$^{-1}$ shows an enhanced asymmetry effect at low temperatures, suggesting an increasing electron-phonon coupling in this system.
  • We report the observation of a pseudogap in the \emph{ab}-plane optical conductivity of underdoped Ba$_{1-x}$K$_{x}$Fe$_{2}$As$_{2}$ ($x = 0.2$ and 0.12) single crystals. Both samples show prominent gaps opened by a spin density wave (SDW) order and superconductivity at the transition temperatures $T_{\it SDW}$ and $T_c$, respectively. In addition, we observe an evident pseudogap below $T^{\ast} \sim$ 75 K, a temperature much lower than $T_{\it SDW}$ but much higher than $T_{c}$. A spectral weight analysis shows that the pseudogap is closely connected to the superconducting gap, indicating the possibility of its being a precursor of superconductivity. The doping dependence of the gaps is also supportive of such a scenario.
  • We show magnetotransport results on Ba(Fe$_{1-x}$Co$_x$)$_2$As$_2$ ($0.0 \leq x \leq 0.13$) single crystals. We identify the low temperature resistance step at 23 K in the parent compound with the onset of filamentary superconductivity (FLSC), which is suppressed by an applied magnetic field in a similar manner to the suppression of bulk superconductivity (SC) in doped samples. FLSC is found to persist across the phase diagram until the long range antiferromagnetic order is completely suppressed. A significant suppression of FLSC occurs for $0.02<x<0.04$, the doping concentration where bulk SC emerges. Based on these results and the recent report of an electronic anisotropy maximum for 0.02 $\leq x \leq$ 0.04 [Science 329, 824 (2010)], we speculate that, besides spin fluctuations, orbital fluctuations may also play an important role in the emergence of SC in iron-based superconductors.
  • Superconducting triangular Nb wire networks with high normal-state resistance are fabricated by using a negative tone hydrogen silsesquioxane (HSQ) resist. Robust magnetoresistance oscillations are observed up to high magnetic fields and maintained at low temperatures, due to the eective reduction of wire dimensions. Well-defined dips appear at integral and rational values (1/2, 1/3, 1/4) of the reduced flux f = Phi/Phi_0, which is the first observation in the triangular wire networks. These results are well consistent with theoretical calculations for the reduced critical temperature as a function of f.
  • Superconducting Nb thin films with rectangular arrays of submicron antidots have been systemically investigated by transport measurements. In low fields, the magnetoresistance curves demonstrate well-defined dips at integral and rational numbers of flux quanta per unit cell, which corresponds to a superconducting wire network-like regime. When the magnetic field is higher than a saturation field, interstitial vortices interrupt the collective oscillation in low fields and form vortex sublattice, where a larger magnetic field interval is observed. In higher fields, a crossover behavior from the interstitial sublattice state to a single-loop-like state is observed, characterized by oscillations with a period of $\Phi_0/\pi r_{eff}^2$, originating from the existence of edge superconducting states with a size $r_{eff}$ around the antidots.
  • We present transport measurement results on superconducting Nb films with diluted triangular arrays (honeycomb and kagom\'{e}) of holes. The patterned films have large disk-shaped interstitial regions even when the edge-to-edge separations between nearest neighboring holes are comparable to the coherence length. Changes in the field interval of two consecutive minima in the field dependent resistance $R(H)$ curves are observed. In the low field region, fine structures in the $R(H)$ and $T_c(H)$ curves are identified in both arrays. Comparison of experimental data with calculation results shows that these structures observed in honeycomb and kagom\'{e} hole arrays resemble those in wire networks with triangular and $T_3$ symmetries, respectively. Our findings suggest that even in these specified periodic hole arrays with very large interstitial regions, the low field fine structures are determined by the connectivity of the arrays
  • Abnormal magnetoresistance behavior is found in superconducting Nb films perforated with rectangular arrays of antidots (holes). Generally magnetoresistance were always found to increase with increasing magnetic field. Here we observed a reversal of this behavior for particular in low temperature or current density. This phenomenon is due to a strong 'caging effect' which interstitial vortices are strongly trapped among pinned multivortices.
  • We determined the optical conductivity of Bi(2)Sr(2-x)La(x)CuO(6) at dopings covering the phase diagram from the underdoped to the overdoped regimes. The frequency dependent scattering rate shows a pseudogap extending into the overdoped regime. We found that the effective mass enhancement calculated from the optical conductivity is constant throughout the phase diagram. Conversely, the effective optical charge density varies almost linearly with doping. Our results suggest that the low frequency electrodynamics of Bi(2)Sr(2-x)La(x)CuO(6) is not strongly affected by the long range Mott transition.
  • Similar to silicon that is the basis of conventional electronics, strontium titanate (SrTiO3) is the bedrock of the emerging field of oxide electronics. SrTiO3 is the preferred template to create exotic two-dimensional (2D) phases of electron matter at oxide interfaces, exhibiting metal-insulator transitions, superconductivity, or large negative magnetoresistance. However, the physical nature of the electronic structure underlying these 2D electron gases (2DEGs) remains elusive, although its determination is crucial to understand their remarkable properties. Here we show, using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES), that there is a highly metallic universal 2DEG at the vacuum-cleaved surface of SrTiO3, independent of bulk carrier densities over more than seven decades, including the undoped insulating material. This 2DEG is confined within a region of ~5 unit cells with a sheet carrier density of ~0.35 electrons per a^2 (a is the cubic lattice parameter). We unveil a remarkable electronic structure consisting on multiple subbands of heavy and light electrons. The similarity of this 2DEG with those reported in SrTiO3-based heterostructures and field-effect transistors suggests that different forms of electron confinement at the surface of SrTiO3 lead to essentially the same 2DEG. Our discovery provides a model system for the study of the electronic structure of 2DEGs in SrTiO3-based devices, and a novel route to generate 2DEGs at surfaces of transition-metal oxides.
  • We report the first formation of the metallic $p$-$n$ junctions, the ferroelectric (Ba,Sr)TiO$_3$ (BST) switched optimally electron-doped ($n$-type) metallic T'-phase superconductor, (La,Ce)$_2$CuO$_4$ (LCCO), and hole-doped ($p$-type) metallic CMR manganite (La,Sr)MnO$_3$ (LSMO) junctions. In contrast with the previous semiconductor $p$-$n$ ($p$-$I$-$n$) junctions which are switched by the built-in field $V_0$, the present metallic oxides $p$-$I$-$n$ junctions are switched by double barrier fields, the built-in field $V_0$, and the ferroelectric reversed polarized field $V_{rp}$, both take together to lead the junctions to possess definite parameters, such as definite negligible reversed current ($10^{-9}$ A), large breakdown voltage ($>$7 V), and ultrahigh rectification ($>2\times10^4$) in the bias voltage 1.2 V to 2.0 V and temperature range from 5 to over 300 K. The related transport feature, barrier size effect, and temperature effect are also observed and defined.
  • Magnetic and transport properties of $Co Sr_2 Y_{1-x} Ca_x Cu_2 O_7$ ($x=0 \sim 0.4$) system have been investigated. A broad maximum in M(T) curve, indicative of low-dimensional antiferromagnetic ordering originated from $CoO_{1+\delta}$ layers, is observed in Ca-free sample. With increasing Ca doping level up to 0.2, the M(T) curve remains almost unchanged, while resistivity is reduced by three orders. Higher Ca doping level leads to a drastic change of magnetic properties. In comparison with the samples with $x=0.0 \sim 0.2$, the temperature corresponding to the maximum of M(T) is much lowered for the sample $x$=0.3. The sample $x$=0.4 shows a small kink instead of a broad maximum and a weak ferromagnetic feature. The electrical transport behavior is found to be closely related to magnetic properties for the sample $x$=0.2, 0.25, 0.3, 0.4. It suggests that $CoO_{1+\delta}$ layers are involved in charge transport in addition to conducting $CuO_2$ planes to interpret the correlation between magnetism and charge transport. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies give an additional evidence of the the transfer of the holes into the $CoO_{1+\delta}$ charge reservoir.