• GRAVITY Collaboration: R. Abuter, M. Accardo, A. Amorim, N. Anugu, G. Ávila, N. Azouaoui, M. Benisty, J.P. Berger, N. Blind, H. Bonnet, P. Bourget, W. Brandner, R. Brast, A. Buron, L. Burtscher, F. Cassaing, F. Chapron, É. Choquet, Y. Clénet, C. Collin, V. Coudé du Foresto, W. de Wit, P.T. de Zeeuw, C. Deen, F. Delplancke-Ströbele, R. Dembet, F. Derie, J. Dexter, G. Duvert, M. Ebert, A. Eckart, F. Eisenhauer, M. Esselborn, P. Fédou, G. Finger, P. Garcia, C.E. Garcia Dabo, R. Garcia Lopez, E. Gendron, R. Genzel, S. Gillessen, F. Gonte, P. Gordo, M. Grould, U. Grözinger, S. Guieu, P. Haguenauer, O. Hans, X. Haubois, M. Haug, F. Haussmann, Th. Henning, S. Hippler, M. Horrobin, A. Huber, Z. Hubert, N. Hubin, C.A. Hummel, G. Jakob, A. Janssen, L. Jochum, L. Jocou, A. Kaufer, S. Kellner, L. Kern, P. Kervella, M. Kiekebusch, R. Klein, Y. Kok, J. Kolb, M. Kulas, S. Lacour, V. Lapeyrère, B. Lazareff, J.-B. Le Bouquin, P. Lèna, R. Lenzen, S. Lévêque, M. Lippa, Y. Magnard, L. Mehrgan, M. Mellein, A. Mérand, J. Moreno-Ventas, T. Moulin, E. Müller, F. Müller, U. Neumann, S. Oberti, T. Ott, L. Pallanca, J. Panduro, L. Pasquini, T. Paumard, I. Percheron, K. Perraut, G. Perrin, A. Pflüger, O. Pfuhl, T. Phan Duc, P.M. Plewa, D. Popovic, S. Rabien, A. Ramírez, J. Ramos, C. Rau, M. Riquelme, R.-R. Rohloff, G. Rousset, J. Sanchez-Bermudez, S. Scheithauer, M. Schöller, N. Schuhler, J. Spyromilio, C. Straubmeier, E. Sturm, M. Suarez, K.R.W. Tristram, N. Ventura, F. Vincent, I. Waisberg, I. Wank, J. Weber, E. Wieprecht, M. Wiest, E. Wiezorrek, M. Wittkowski, J. Woillez, B. Wolff, S. Yazici, D. Ziegler, G. Zins
    May 5, 2017 astro-ph.IM
    GRAVITY is a new instrument to coherently combine the light of the European Southern Observatory Very Large Telescope Interferometer to form a telescope with an equivalent 130 m diameter angular resolution and a collecting area of 200 m$^2$. The instrument comprises fiber fed integrated optics beam combination, high resolution spectroscopy, built-in beam analysis and control, near-infrared wavefront sensing, phase-tracking, dual beam operation and laser metrology [...]. This article gives an overview of GRAVITY and reports on the performance and the first astronomical observations during commissioning in 2015/16. We demonstrate phase tracking on stars as faint as m$_K$ ~ 10 mag, phase-referenced interferometry of objects fainter than m$_K$ ~ 15 mag with a limiting magnitude of m$_K$ ~ 17 mag, minute long coherent integrations, a visibility accuracy of better than 0.25 %, and spectro-differential phase and closure phase accuracy better than 0.5{\deg}, corresponding to a differential astrometric precision of better than 10 microarcseconds ({\mu}as). The dual-beam astrometry, measuring the phase difference of two objects with laser metrology, is still under commissioning. First observations show residuals as low as 50 {\mu}as when following objects over several months. We illustrate the instrument performance with the observations of archetypical objects for the different instrument modes. Examples include the Galactic Center supermassive black hole and its fast orbiting star S2 for phase referenced dual beam observations and infrared wavefront sensing, the High Mass X-Ray Binary BP Cru and the Active Galactic Nucleus of PDS 456 for few {\mu}as spectro-differential astrometry, the T Tauri star S CrA for a spectro-differential visibility analysis, {\xi} Tel and 24 Cap for high accuracy visibility observations, and {\eta} Car for interferometric imaging with GRAVITY.
  • We observe the HMXB BP Cru using interferometry in the near-infrared K band with VLTI/GRAVITY. Continuum visibilities are at most partially resolved, consistent with the predicted size of the hypergiant. Differential visibility amplitude ($\Delta |V| \sim 5\%$) and phase ($\Delta \phi \sim 2 \deg$) signatures are observed across the HeI $2.059 \mu$m and Br$\gamma$ lines, the latter seen strongly in emission, unusual for the donor star's spectral type. For a baseline $B \sim 100$m, the differential phase RMS $\sim 0.2 \deg$ corresponds to an astrometric precision of $\sim 2 \mu$as. A model-independent analysis in the marginally resolved limit of interferometry reveals asymmetric and extended emission with a strong wavelength dependence. We propose geometric models based on an extended and distorted wind and/or a high density gas stream, which has long been predicted to be present in this system. The observations show that optical interferometry is now able to resolve HMXBs at the spatial scale at which accretion takes place, and therefore probe the effects of the gravitational and radiation fields of the compact object on its environment.
  • We present the first optical observation at sub-milliarcsecond (mas) scale of the microquasar SS 433 obtained with the GRAVITY instrument on the VLT interferometer. The 3.5 hour exposure reveals a rich K-band spectrum dominated by hydrogen Br$\gamma\ $ and \ion{He}{i} lines, as well as (red-shifted) emission lines coming from the jets. The K-band continuum emitting region is dominated by a marginally resolved point source ($<$ 1 mas) embedded inside a diffuse background accounting for 10\% of the total flux. The jet line positions agree well with the ones expected from the jet kinematic model, an interpretation also supported by the consistent sign (i.e. negative/positive for the receding/approaching jet component) of the phase shifts observed in the lines. The significant visibility drop across the jet lines, together with the small and nearly identical phases for all baselines, point toward a jet that is offset by less than 0.5 mas from the continuum source and resolved in the direction of propagation, with a typical size of 2 mas. The jet position angle of $\sim$80$^{\circ}$ is consistent with the expected one at the observation date. Jet emission so close to the central binary system would suggest that line locking, if relevant to explain the amplitude and stability of the 0.26c jet velocity, operates on elements heavier than hydrogen. The Br$\gamma\ $ profile is broad and double peaked. It is better resolved than the continuum and the change of the phase signal sign across the line on all baselines suggests an East-West oriented geometry alike the jet direction and supporting a (polar) disk wind origin.
  • Context. The mass-loss mechanism of cool massive evolved stars is poorly understood. The proximity of Betelgeuse makes it an appealing target to study its atmosphere, map the shape of its envelope, and follow the structure of its wind from the photosphere out to the interstellar medium. Aims. A link is suspected between the powerful convective motions in Betelgeuse and its mass loss. We aim to constrain the spatial structure and temporal evolution of the convective pattern on the photosphere and to search for evidence of this link. Methods. We report new interferometric observations in the infrared H band using the VLTI/PIONIER instrument. We monitored the photosphere of Betelgeuse between 2012 January and 2014 November to look for evolutions that may trigger the outflow. Results. Our interferometric observations at low spatial frequencies are compatible with the presence of a hot spot on the photosphere that has a characteristic width of one stellar radius. It appears to be superposed on the smaller scale convective pattern. In the higher spatial frequency domain, we observe a significant difference between the observations and the predictions of 3D hydrodynamical simulations. Conclusions. We bring new evidence for the presence of a convective pattern in the photosphere of red supergiants. The inferred hot spot is probably the top of a giant convection cell although an asymmetric extension of the star cannot be excluded by these interferometric observations alone. The properties of the observed surface features show a stronger contrast and inhomogeneity as predicted by 3D radiative hydrodynamical simulations. We propose that the large observed feature is modifying the signature of the convective pattern at the surface of the star in a way that simulations cannot reproduce.
  • The bright southern star L2 Pup is a particularly prominent asymptotic giant branch (AGB) star, as its distance of 64 pc makes it the nearest of its type. We report new adaptive optics observations of L2 Pup at visible wavelengths with the SPHERE/ZIMPOL instrument of the VLT that confirm the presence of the circumstellar dust disk at high inclination discovered recently by Kervella et al. (2014b). The signature of the three-dimensional structure of the disk is clearly observed in the map of the degree of linear polarization pL. We identify the inner rim of the disk through its polarimetric signature at a radius of 6 AU from the AGB star. The ZIMPOL intensity images in the V and R bands also reveal a close-in secondary source at a projected separation of 2 AU from the primary. The identification of the spectral type of this companion is uncertain due to the strong reddening from the disk, but its photometry suggests that it is a late K giant, of comparable mass to the AGB star. We present refined physical parameters for the dust disk derived using the RADMC-3D radiative transfer code. We also interpret the pL map using a simple polarization model to infer the three-dimensional structure of the envelope. Interactions between the inner binary system and the disk apparently form spiral structures that propagate along the orthogonal axis to the disk to form streamers. Two dust plumes propagating orthogonally to the disk are also detected. They originate in the inner stellar system, and are possibly related to the interaction of the wind of the two stars with the material in the disk. Based on the morphology of the envelope of L2 Pup, we propose that this star is at an early stage of the formation of a bipolar planetary nebula.
  • The physical mechanism through which the outgoing material of massive red supergiants is accelerated above the escape velocity is unclear. Thanks to the transparency of its circumstellar envelope, the nearby red supergiant Betelgeuse gives the opportunity to probe the innermost layers of the envelope of a typical red supergiant down to the photosphere, i.e. where the acceleration of the wind is expected to occur. We took advantage of the SPHERE/ZIMPOL adaptive optics imaging polarimeter to resolve the visible photosphere and close envelope of Betelgeuse. We detect an asymmetric gaseous envelope inside a radius of 2 to 3 times the near-infrared photospheric radius of the star (R*), and a significant Halpha emission mostly contained within 3 R*. From the polarimetric signal, we also identify the signature of dust scattering in an asymmetric and incomplete dust shell located at a similar radius. The presence of dust so close to the star may have a significant impact on the wind acceleration through radiative pressure on the grains. The 3 R* radius emerges as a major interface between the hot gaseous and dusty envelopes. The detected asymmetries strengthen previous indications that the mass loss of Betelgeuse is likely tied to the vigorous convective motions in its atmosphere.
  • The mass-loss process in Mira stars probably occurs in an asymmetric way where dust can form in inhomogeneous circumstellar molecular clumps. Following asymmetries along the pulsation cycle can give us clues about these mass-loss processes. We imaged the Mira star X Hya and its environnement at different epochs to follow the evolution of the morphology in the continuum and in the molecular bands. We observed X Hya with AMBER in J-H-K at low resolution at two epochs. We modelled squared visibilities with geometrical and physical models. We also present imaging reconstruction results obtained with MiRA and based on the physical a priori images. We report on the angular scale change of X Hya between the two epochs. 1D CODEX profiles allowed us to understand and model the spectral variation of squared visibilities and constrain the stellar parameters. Reconstructed model-dependent images enabled us to reproduce closure phase signals and the azimuthal dependence of squared visibilities. They show evidence for material inhomogeneities located in the immediate environment of the star.
  • Optical interferometry is a powerful tool to investigate the close environment of AGB stars. With a spatial resolution of a few milli-arcseconds, it is even possible to image directly the surface of angularly large objects. This is of special interest forMira stars and red supergiants for which the dust-wind is initiated from or very close to the photosphere by an interplay between pulsation and convection. Based on two-epoch interferometric observations of the Mira star X Hya, we present how the variation of the angular size with wavelength challenges pulsation models and how reconstructed images can reveal the evolution of the object shape and of its asymmetric structures.
  • The idea behind FIRST (Fibered Imager foR a Single Telescope) is to use single-mode fibers to combine multiple apertures in a pupil plane as such as to synthesize a bigger aperture. The advantages with respect to a pure imager are i) relaxed tolerance on the pointing and cophasing, ii) higher accuracy in phase measurement, and iii) availability of compact, precise, and active single-mode optics like Lithium Niobate. The latter point being a huge asset in the context of a space mission. One of the problems of DARWIN or SIM-like projects was the difficulty to find low cost pathfinders missions. But the fact that Lithium Niobate optic is small and compact makes it easy to test through small nanosats missions. Moreover, they are commonly used in the telecom industry, and have already been tested on communication satellites. The idea of the FIRST-S demonstrator is to spatialize a 3U CubeSat with a Lithium Niobate nulling interferometer. The technical challenges of the project are: star tracking, beam combination, and nulling capabilities. The optical baseline of the interferometer would be 30 cm, giving a 2.2 AU spatial resolution at distance of 10 pc. The scientific objective of this mission would be to study the visible emission of exozodiacal light in the habitable zone around the closest stars.
  • The stellar population in the central parsec of the Galaxy is dominated by an old (several Gyr) population, but young, massive stars dominate the luminosity function. We have studied the most luminous of these stars, GCIRS 7, in order to constrain the age of the recent star formation event in the Galactic Centre and to characterise it as an interferometric reference for observations of the Galactic Centre with the instrument GRAVITY, which will equip the Very Large Telescope Interferometer in the near future. We present the first H-band interferometric observations of GCIRS 7, obtained using the PIONIER visitor instrument on the VLTI using the four 8.2-m unit telescopes. In addition, we present unpublished K-band VLTI/AMBER data, build JHKL light-curves based on data spanning 4 decades, and measured the star's effective temperature using SINFONI spectroscopy. GCIRS 7 is marginally resolved at H-band (in 2013: uniform-disk diameter=1.076+/-0.093mas, R=960+/-92Rsun at 8.33+/-0.35kpc). We detect a significant circumstellar contribution at K-band. The star and its environment are variable in brightness and in size. The photospheric H-band variations are well modelled with two periods: P0~470+/-10 days (amplitude ~0.64mag) and long secondary period LSP~2700-2850 days (~1.1mag). As measured from CO equivalent width, <Teff>=3600+/-195K. The size, periods, luminosity (<Mbol>=-8.44+/-0.22) and effective temperature are consistent with an M1 supergiant with an initial mass of 22.5+/-2.5Msun and an age of 6.5-10Myr (depending on rotation). This age is in remarkable agreement with most estimates for the recent star formation event in the central parsec. Caution should be taken when using this star as an interferometric reference as it is variable in size, is surrounded by a variable circumstellar environment and large convection cells may form on its photosphere.
  • Recent improvements on the sensitivity and spectral resolution of X-ray observations have led to a better understanding of the properties of matter in the vicinity of High Mass X-ray Binaries hosting a supergiant star and a compact object. However the geometry and physical properties of their environment at larger scales are currently only predicted by simulations. We aim at exploring the environment of Vela X-1 at a few stellar radii of the supergiant using spatially resolved observations in the near-infrared and at studying its dynamical evolution along the 9-day orbital period of the system. We observed Vela X-1 in 2010 and 2012 using long baseline interferometry at VLTI, respectively with the AMBER instrument in the K band and the PIONIER instrument in the H band. The PIONIER observations span through one orbital period to monitor possible evolutions in the geometry of the system. We resolved a structure of $8\pm3~R_\star$ from the AMBER data and $2.0\,_{-1.2}^{+0.7}~R_\star$ from the PIONIER data. From the closure phase we found that the environment of Vela X-1 is symmetrical. We observed comparable measurements between the continuum and the spectral lines in the K band, meaning that both emissions originate from the same forming region. From the monitoring of the system over one period in 2012, we found the signal to be constant with the orbital phase within the error bars. We propose three scenarios for the discrepancy between the two measurements: either there is a strong temperature gradient in the supergiant wind leading to a hot component much more compact than the cool part of the wind observed in the K band, or we observed a diffuse shell in 2010 possibly triggered by an off-state in the accretion rate of the pulsar that was dissolved in the interstellar medium in 2012, or the structure observed in the H band was the stellar photosphere instead of the supergiant wind.
  • We present the first multiplicity-dedicated long baseline optical interferometric survey of the Scorpius-Centaurus-Lupus-Crux association. We used the Sydney University Stellar Interferometer to undertake a survey for new companions to 58 Sco-Cen B- type stars and have detected 24 companions at separations ranging from 7-130mas, 14 of which are new detections. Furthermore, we use a Bayesian analysis and all available information in the literature to determine the multiplicity distribution of the 58 stars in our sample, showing that the companion frequency is F = 1.35 and the mass ratio distribution is best described as a power law with exponent equal to -0.46, agreeing with previous Sco-Cen high mass work and differing significantly from lower-mass stars in Tau-Aur. Based on our analysis, we estimate that among young B-type stars in moving groups, up to 23% are apparently single stars. This has strong implications for the understanding of high-mass star formation, which requires angular momentum dispersal through some mechanism such as formation of multiple systems.
  • Aims. We report on simultaneous observations and modeling of mid-infrared (MIR), near-infrared (NIR), and submillimeter (submm) emission of the source Sgr A* associated with the supermassive black hole at the center of our Galaxy. Our goal was to monitor the activity of Sgr A* at different wavelengths in order to constrain the emitting processes and gain insight into the nature of the close environment of Sgr A*. Methods. We used the MIR instrument VISIR in the BURST imaging mode, the adaptive optics assisted NIR camera NACO, and the sub-mm antenna APEX to monitor Sgr A* over several nights in July 2007. Results. The observations reveal remarkable variability in the NIR and sub-mm during the five nights of observation. No source was detected in the MIR, but we derived the lowest upper limit for a flare at 8.59 microns (22.4 mJy with A_8.59mu = 1.6+/- 0.5). This observational constraint makes us discard the observed NIR emission as coming from a thermal component emitting at sub-mm frequencies. Moreover, comparison of the sub-mm and NIR variability shows that the highest NIR fluxes (flares) are coincident with the lowest sub-mm levels of our five-night campaign involving three flares. We explain this behavior by a loss of electrons to the system and/or by a decrease in the magnetic field, as might conceivably occur in scenarios involving fast outflows and/or magnetic reconnection.
  • Be stars possess gaseous circumstellar disks that modify in many ways the spectrum of the central B star. Furthermore, they exhibit variability at several timescales and for a large number of observables. Putting the pieces together of this dynamical behavior is not an easy task and requires a detailed understanding of the physical processes that control the temporal evolution of the observables. There is an increasing body of evidence that suggests that Be disks are well described by standard $\alpha$-disk theory. This paper is the first of a series that aims at studying the possibility of inferring several disk and stellar parameters through the follow-up of various observables. Here we study the temporal evolution of the disk density for different dynamical scenarios, including the disk build-up as a result of a long and steady mass injection from the star, the disk dissipation that occurs after mass injection is turned off, as well as scenarios in which active periods are followed by periods of quiescence. For those scenarios, we investigate the temporal evolution of continuum photometric observables using a 3-D non-LTE radiative transfer code. We show that lightcurves for different wavelengths are specific of a mass loss history, inclination angle and $\alpha$ viscosity parameter. The diagnostic potential of those lightcurves is also discussed.
  • In the course of an imaging survey we have detected a visual companion to the intermediate-mass star HR 6037. In this letter, we present two epoch observations of the binary with NACO/VLT, and near-IR spectroscopy of the secondary with ISAAC/VLT. The NACO observations allow us to confirm HR 6037B as a co-moving companion. Its J and H band ISAAC spectra suggest the object has an spectral type of M9+-1, with a surface gravity intermediate between that of 10 Myr dwarfs and field dwarfs with identical spectral type. The comparison of its Ks-band photometry with evolutionary tracks allows us to derive a mass, effective temperature, and surface gravity of 62+-20 MJup, Teff = 2330+-200 K, and log g = 5.1+-0.2, respectively. The small mass ratio of the binary, -0.03, and its long orbital period, -5000 yr, makes HR 6037 a rare and uncommon binary system.
  • GRAVITY is an adaptive optics assisted Beam Combiner for the second generation VLTI instrumentation. The instrument will provide high-precision narrow-angle astrometry and phase-referenced interferometric imaging in the astronomical K-band for faint objects. We describe the wide range of science that will be tackled with this instrument, highlighting the unique capabilities of the VLTI in combination with GRAVITY. The most prominent goal is to observe highly relativistic motions of matter close to the event horizon of Sgr A*, the massive black hole at center of the Milky Way. We present the preliminary design that fulfils the requirements that follow from the key science drivers: It includes an integrated optics, 4-telescope, dual feed beam combiner operated in a cryogenic vessel; near-infrared wavefrontsensing adaptive optics; fringe-tracking on secondary sources within the field of view of the VLTI and a novel metrology concept. Simulations show that 10 {\mu}as astrometry within few minutes is feasible for a source with a magnitude of mK = 15 like Sgr A*, given the availability of suitable phase reference sources (mK = 10). Using the same setup, imaging of mK = 18 stellar sources in the interferometric field of view is possible, assuming a full night of observations and the corresponding UV coverage of the VLTI.
  • Context. The red supergiant (RSG) Betelgeuse is an irregular variable star. Convection may play an important role in understanding this variability. Interferometric observations can be interpreted using sophisticated simulations of stellar convection. Aims. We compare the visibility curves and closure phases obtained from our 3D simulation of RSG convection with CO5BOLD to various interferometric observations of Betelgeuse from the optical to the H band in order to characterize and measure the convection pattern on this star. Methods. We use 3D radiative-hydrodynamics (RHD) simulation to compute intensity maps in different filters and we thus derive interferometric observables using the post-processing radiative transfer code OPTIM3D. The synthetic visibility curves and closure phases are compared to observations. Results. We provide a robust detection of the granulation pattern on the surface of Betelgeuse in the optical and in the H band based on excellent fits to the observed visibility points and closure phases. Moreover, we determine that the Betelgeuse surface in the H band is covered by small to medium scale (5-15 mas) convection-related surface structures and a large (30 mas) convective cell. In this spectral region, H2O molecules are the main absorbers and contribute to the small structures and to the position of the first null of the visibility curve (i.e. the apparent stellar radius).
  • Aims. We aim to explore the photosphere of the very cool late-type star VX Sgr and in particular the existence and characterization of molecular layers above the continuum forming photosphere. Methods. We obtained interferometric observations with the VLTI/AMBER interferometer using the fringe tracker FINITO in the spectral domain 1.45-2.50 micron with a spectral resolution of about 35 and baselines ranging from 15 to 88 meters.We perform independent image reconstruction for different wavelength bins and fit the interferometric data with a geometrical toy model.We also compare the data to 1D dynamical models of Miras atmosphere and to 3D hydrodynamical simulations of red supergiant (RSG) and asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars. Results. Reconstructed images and visibilities show a strong wavelength dependence. The H-band images display two bright spots whose positions are confirmed by the geometrical toy model. The inhomogeneities are qualitatively predicted by 3D simulations. At about 2,00 micron and in the region 2,35 - 2,50 micron, the photosphere appears extended and the radius is larger than in the H band. In this spectral region, the geometrical toy model locates a third bright spot outside the photosphere that can be a feature of the molecular layers. The wavelength dependence of the visibility can be qualitatively explained by 1D dynamical models of Mira atmospheres. The best-fitting photospheric models show a good match with the observed visibilities and give a photospheric diameter of theta = 8,82+-0,50 mas. The H2O molecule seems to be the dominant absorber in the molecular layers. Conclusions. We show that the atmosphere of VX Sgr rather resembles Mira/AGB star model atmospheres than RSG model atmospheres. In particular, we see molecular (water) layers that are typical for Mira stars.
  • This paper reports on H-band interferometric observations of Betelgeuse made at the three-telescope interferometer IOTA. We image Betelgeuse and its asymmetries to understand the spatial variation of the photosphere, including its diameter, limb darkening, effective temperature, surrounding brightness, and bright (or dark) star spots. We used different theoretical simulations of the photosphere and dusty environment to model the visibility data. We made images with parametric modeling and two image reconstruction algorithms: MIRA and WISARD. We measure an average limb-darkened diameter of 44.28 +/- 0.15 mas with linear and quadratic models and a Rosseland diameter of 45.03 +/- 0.12 mas with a MARCS model. These measurements lead us to derive an updated effective temperature of 3600 +/- 66 K. We detect a fully-resolved environment to which the silicate dust shell is likely to contribute. By using two imaging reconstruction algorithms, we unveiled two bright spots on the surface of Betelgeuse. One spot has a diameter of about 11 mas and accounts for about 8.5% of the total flux. The second one is unresolved (diameter < 9 mas) with 4.5% of the total flux. Resolved images of Betelgeuse in the H band are asymmetric at the level of a few percent. The MOLsphere is not detected in this wavelength range. The amount of measured limb-darkening is in good agreement with model predictions. The two spots imaged at the surface of the star are potential signatures of convective cells.
  • We present infrared interferometric imaging of the S-type Mira star Chi Cygni. The object was observed at four different epochs in 2005-2006 with the IOTA optical interferometer (H band). Images show up to 40% variation in the stellar diameter, as well as significant changes in the limb darkening and stellar inhomogeneities. Model fitting gave precise time-dependent values of the stellar diameter, and reveals presence and displacement of a warm molecular layer. The star radius, corrected for limb darkening, has a mean value of 12.1 mas and shows a 5.1mas amplitude pulsation. Minimum diameter was observed at phase 0.94+/-0.01. Maximum temperature was observed several days later at phase 1.02+/-0.02. We also show that combining the angular acceleration of the molecular layer with CO (Delta v = 3) radial velocity measurements yields a 5.9+/-1.5 mas parallax. The constant acceleration of the CO molecules -- during 80% of the pulsation cycle -- lead us to argument for a free-falling layer. The acceleration is compatible with a gravitational field produced by a 2.1(+1.5/-0.7) solar mass star. This last value is in agreement with fundamental mode pulsator models. We foresee increased development of techniques consisting in combining radial velocity with interferometric angular measurements, ultimately allowing total mapping of the speed, density, and position of the diverse species in pulsation driven atmospheres.
  • This paper reports measurements of Sgr A* made with NACO in L' -band (3.80 um), Ks-band (2.12 um) and H-band (1.66 um) and with VISIR in N-band (11.88 um) at the ESO VLT, as well as with XMM-Newton at X-ray (2-10 keV) wavelengths. On 4 April, 2007, a very bright flare was observed from Sgr A* simultaneously at L'-band and X-ray wavelengths. No emission was detected using VISIR. The resulting SED has a blue slope (beta > 0 for nuL_nu ~ nu^beta, consistent with nuL_nu ~ nu^0.4) between 12 micron and 3.8 micron. For the first time our high quality data allow a detailed comparison of infrared and X-ray light curves with a resolution of a few minutes. The IR and X-ray flares are simultaneous to within 3 minutes. However the IR flare lasts significantly longer than the X-ray flare (both before and after the X-ray peak) and prominent substructures in the 3.8 micron light curve are clearly not seen in the X-ray data. From the shortest timescale variations in the L'-band lightcurve we find that the flaring region must be no more than 1.2 R_S in size. The high X-ray to infrared flux ratio, blue nuL_nu slope MIR to L' -band, and the soft nuL_nu spectral index of the X-ray flare together place strong constraints on possible flare emission mechanisms. We find that it is quantitatively difficult to explain this bright X-ray flare with inverse Compton processes. A synchrotron emission scenario from an electron distribution with a cooling break is a more viable scenario.
  • Two of the three instruments proposed to ESO for the second generation instrumentation of the VLTI would use integrated optics for beam combination. Several design are studied, including co-axial and multi-axial recombination. An extensive quantity of combiners are therefore under test in our laboratories. We will present the various components, and the method used to validate and compare the different combiners. Finally, we will discuss the performances and their implication for both VSI and Gravity VLTI instruments.
  • We present the second-generation VLTI instrument GRAVITY, which currently is in the preliminary design phase. GRAVITY is specifically designed to observe highly relativistic motions of matter close to the event horizon of Sgr A*, the massive black hole at center of the Milky Way. We have identified the key design features needed to achieve this goal and present the resulting instrument concept. It includes an integrated optics, 4-telescope, dual feed beam combiner operated in a cryogenic vessel; near infrared wavefront sensing adaptive optics; fringe tracking on secondary sources within the field of view of the VLTI and a novel metrology concept. Simulations show that the planned design matches the scientific needs; in particular that 10 microarcsecond astrometry is feasible for a source with a magnitude of K=15 like Sgr A*, given the availability of suitable phase reference sources.
  • This paper is an H band interferometric examination of Arcturus, a star frequently used as a spatial and spectral calibrator. Using the IOTA 3 telescope interferometer, we performed spectro-interferometric observation (R~35) of Arcturus. Atmospheric models and prescriptions were fitted to the data to derive the brightness distribution of the photosphere. Image reconstruction was also obtained using two software algorithms: Wisard and Mira. An achromatic power law proved to be a good model of the brightness distribution, with a limb darkening compatible with the one derived from atmospheric model simulations using our Marcs model. A Rosseland diameter of 21.05+/-0.21 was derived, corresponding to an effective temperature of T_eff=4295+/-26 K. No companion was detected from the closure phases, with an upper limit on the brightness ratio of 8e-4 at 1AU. Dynamic range at such distance from the photosphere was established at 1.5e-4 (1sigma rms). An upper limit of 1.7e-3 was also derived for the level of brightness asymmetries present on the photosphere.
  • The multiplicity of early-type stars is still not well established. The studies of individual star forming regions suggest a connection with the age and the environment. To fill in this gap, we started the first detailed adaptive-optic-assisted imaging survey of 308 BA-type field stars within 300 pc from the Sun, to derive their multiplicity in a homogeneous way. Our first epoch observations yield 195 companion candidates around 117 sample targets. The second epoch observations are underway.