• This work describes the first observations of the ionisation of neon in a metastable atomic state utilising a strong-field, few-cycle light pulse. We compare the observations to theoretical predictions based on the Ammosov-Delone-Krainov (ADK) theory and a solution to the time-dependent Schrodinger equation (TDSE). The TDSE provides better agreement with the experimental data than the ADK theory. We optically pump the target atomic species and demonstrate that the ionisation rate depends on the spin state of the target atoms and provide physically transparent interpretation of such a spin dependence in the frameworks of the spin-polarised Hartree-Fock and random-phase approximations.
  • We present accurate measurements of carrier-envelope phase effects on ionisation of the noble gases with few-cycle laser pulses. The experimental apparatus is calibrated by using atomic hydrogen data to remove any systematic offsets and thereby obtain accurate CEP data on other generally used noble gases such as Ar, Kr and Xe. Experimental results for H are well supported by exact TDSE theoretical simulations however significant differences are observed in case of noble gases.
  • We studied the recollision dynamics between the electrons and D$_2^+$ ions following the tunneling ionization of D$_2$ molecules in an intense short pulse laser field. The returning electron collisionally excites the D$_2^+$ ion to excited electronic states from there D$_2^+$ can dissociate or be further ionized by the laser field, resulting in D$^+$ + D or D$^+$ + D$^+$, respectively. We modeled the fragmentation dynamics and calculated the resulting kinetic energy spectrum of D$^+$ to compare with recent experiments. Since the recollision time is locked to the tunneling ionization time which occurs only within fraction of an optical cycle, the peaks in the D$^+$ kinetic energy spectra provides a measure of the time when the recollision occurs. This collision dynamics forms the basis of the molecular clock where the clock can be read with attosecond precision, as first proposed by Corkum and coworkers. By analyzing each of the elementary processes leading to the fragmentation quantitatively, we identified how the molecular clock is to be read from the measured kinetic energy spectra of D$^+$ and what laser parameters be used in order to measure the clock more accurately.
  • The kinetic energy distribution of D$^+$ ions resulting from the interaction of a femtosecond laser pulse with D$_2$ molecules is calculated based on the rescattering model. From analyzing the molecular dynamics, it is shown that the recollision time between the ionized electron and the D$_2^+$ ion can be read from the D$^+$ kinetic energy peaks to attosecond accuracy. We further suggest that more precise reading of the clock can be achieved by using shorter fs laser pulses (about 15fs).