• Transitions metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) are direct semiconductors in the atomic monolayer (ML) limit with fascinating optical and spin-valley properties. The strong optical absorption of up to 20 % for a single ML is governed by excitons, electron-hole pairs bound by Coulomb attraction. Excited exciton states in MoSe$_2$ and MoTe$_2$ monolayers have so far been elusive due to their low oscillator strength and strong inhomogeneous broadening. Here we show that encapsulation in hexagonal boron nitride results in emission line width of the A:1$s$ exciton below 1.5 meV and 3 meV in our MoSe$_2$ and MoTe$_2$ monolayer samples, respectively. This allows us to investigate the excited exciton states by photoluminescence upconversion spectroscopy for both monolayer materials. The excitation laser is tuned into resonance with the A:1$s$ transition and we observe emission of excited exciton states up to 200 meV above the laser energy. We demonstrate bias control of the efficiency of this non-linear optical process. At the origin of upconversion our model calculations suggest an exciton-exciton (Auger) scattering mechanism specific to TMD MLs involving an excited conduction band thus generating high energy excitons with small wave-vectors. The optical transitions are further investigated by white light reflectivity, photoluminescence excitation and resonant Raman scattering confirming their origin as excited excitonic states in monolayer thin semiconductors.
  • Charged excitons, or X$^{\pm}$-trions, in monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides have binding energies of several tens of meV. Together with the neutral exciton X$^0$ they dominate the emission spectrum at low and elevated temperatures. We use charge tunable devices based on WSe$_2$ monolayers encapsulated in hexagonal boron nitride, to investigate the difference in binding energy between X$^+$ and X$^-$ and the X$^-$ fine structure. We find in the charge neutral regime, the X$^0$ emission accompanied at lower energy by a strong peak close to the longitudinal optical (LO) phonon energy. This peak is absent in reflectivity measurements, where only the X$^0$ and an excited state of the X$^0$ are visible. In the $n$-doped regime, we find a closer correspondence between emission and reflectivity as the trion transition with a well-resolved fine-structure splitting of 6~meV for X$^-$ is observed. We present a symmetry analysis of the different X$^+$ and X$^-$ trion states and results of the binding energy calculations. We compare the trion binding energy for the $n$-and $p$-doped regimes with our model calculations for low carrier concentrations. We demonstrate that the splitting between the X$^+$ and X$^-$ trions as well as the fine structure of the X$^-$ state can be related to the short-range Coulomb exchange interaction between the charge carriers.
  • The strong light-matter interaction in transition Metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) monolayers (MLs) is governed by robust excitons. Important progress has been made to control the dielectric environment surrounding the MLs, especially through hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) encapsulation, which drastically reduces the inhomogeneous contribution to the exciton linewidth. Most studies use exfoliated hBN from high quality flakes grown under high pressure. In this work, we show that hBN grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) over a large surface area substrate has a similarly positive impact on the optical emission from TMD MLs. We deposit MoS$_2$ and MoSe$_2$ MLs on ultrathin hBN films (few MLs thick) grown on Ni/MgO(111) by MBE. Then we cover them with exfoliated hBN to finally obtain an encapsulated sample : exfoliated hBN/TMD ML/MBE hBN. We observe an improved optical quality of our samples compared to TMD MLs exfoliated directly on SiO$_2$ substrates. Our results suggest that hBN grown by MBE could be used as a flat and charge free substrate for fabricating TMD-based heterostructures on a larger scale.
  • We study experimentally and theoretically the exciton-phonon interaction in MoSe2 monolayers encapsulated in hexagonal BN, which has an important impact on both optical absorption and emission processes. The exciton transition linewidth down to 1 meV at low temperatures makes it possible to observe high energy tails in absorption and emission extending over several meV, not masked by inhomogeneous broadening. We develop an analytical theory of the exciton-phonon interaction accounting for the deformation potential induced by the longitudinal acoustic phonons, which plays an important role in exciton formation. The theory allows fitting absorption and emission spectra and permits estimating the deformation potential in MoSe2 monolayers. We underline the reasons why exciton-phonon coupling is much stronger in two-dimensional transition metal dichalcodenides as compared to conventional quantum well structures. The importance of exciton-phonon interactions is further highlighted by the observation of a multitude of Raman features in the photoluminescence excitation experiments.
  • In III-V semiconductor nano-structures the electron and nuclear spin dynamics are strongly coupled. Both spin systems can be controlled optically. The nuclear spin dynamics is widely studied, but little is known about the initialization mechanisms. Here we investigate optical pumping of carrier and nuclear spins in charge tunable GaAs dots grown on 111A substrates. We demonstrate dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) at zero magnetic field in a single quantum dot for the positively charged exciton X$^+$ state transition. We tune the DNP in both amplitude and sign by variation of an applied bias voltage V$_g$. Variation of $\Delta$V$_g$ of the order of 100 mV changes the Overhauser splitting (nuclear spin polarization) from -30 $\mu$eV (-22 %) to +10 $\mu$eV (+7 %), although the X$^+$ photoluminescence polarization does not change sign over this voltage range. This indicates that absorption in the structure and energy relaxation towards the X$^+$ ground state might provide favourable scenarios for efficient electron-nuclear spin flip-flops, generating DNP during the first tens of ps of the X$^+$ lifetime which is of the order of hundreds of ps. Voltage control of DNP is further confirmed in Hanle experiments.
  • The emission of circularly polarized light from a single quantum dot relies on the injection of carriers with well-defined spin polarization. Here we demonstrate single dot electroluminescence (EL) with a circular polarization degree up to 35% at zero applied magnetic field. The injection of spin polarized electrons is achieved by combining ultrathin CoFeB electrodes on top of a spin-LED device with p-type InGaAs quantum dots in the active region. We measure an Overhauser shift of several $\mu$eV at zero magnetic field for the positively charged exciton (trion X$^+$) EL emission, which changes sign as we reverse the injected electron spin orientation. This is a signature of dynamic polarization of the nuclear spins in the quantum dot induced by the hyperfine interaction with the electrically injected electron spin. This study paves the way for electrical control of nuclear spin polarization in a single quantum dot without any external magnetic field.
  • We have combined spatially-resolved steady-state micro-photoluminescence ($\mu$PL) with time-resolved photoluminescence (TRPL) to investigate the exciton diffusion in a WSe$_2$ monolayer encapsulated with hexagonal boron nitride (hBN). At 300 K, we extract an exciton diffusion length $L_X= 0.36\pm 0.02 \; \mu$m and an exciton diffusion coefficient of $D_X=14.5 \pm 2\;\mbox{cm}^2$/s. This represents a nearly 10-fold increase in the effective mobility of excitons with respect to several previously reported values on nonencapsulated samples. At cryogenic temperatures, the high optical quality of these samples has allowed us to discriminate the diffusion of the different exciton species : bright and dark neutral excitons, as well as charged excitons. The longer lifetime of dark neutral excitons yields a larger diffusion length of $L_{X^D}=1.5\pm 0.02 \;\mu$m.
  • The optical properties of MoS2 monolayers are dominated by excitons, but for spectrally broad optical transitions in monolayers exfoliated directly onto SiO2 substrates detailed information on excited exciton states is inaccessible. Encapsulation in hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) allows approaching the homogenous exciton linewidth, but interferences in the van der Waals heterostructures make direct comparison between transitions in optical spectra with different oscillator strength more challenging. Here we reveal in reflectivity and in photoluminescence excitation spectroscopy the presence of excited states of the A-exciton in MoS2 monolayers encapsulated in hBN layers of calibrated thickness, allowing to extrapolate an exciton binding energy of about 220 meV. We theoretically reproduce the energy separations and oscillator strengths measured in reflectivity by combining the exciton resonances calculated for a screened two-dimensional Coulomb potential with transfer matrix calculations of the reflectivity for the van der Waals structure. Our analysis shows a very different evolution of the exciton oscillator strength with principal quantum number for the screened Coulomb potential as compared to the ideal two-dimensional hydrogen model.
  • The optical selection rules for inter-band transitions in WSe2, WS2 and MoSe2 transition metal dichalcogenide monolayers are investigated by polarization-resolved photoluminescence experiments with a signal collection from the sample edge. These measurements reveal a strong polarization-dependence of the emission lines. We see clear signatures of the emitted light with the electric field oriented perpendicular to the monolayer plane, corresponding to an inter-band optical transition forbidden at normal incidence used in standard optical spectroscopy measurements. The experimental results are in agreement with the optical selection rules deduced from group theory analysis, highlighting the key role played by the different symmetries of the conduction and valence bands split by the spin-orbit interaction. These studies yield a direct determination on the bright-dark exciton splitting, for which we measure 40 $\pm 1$ meV and 55 $\pm 2$ meV for WSe2 and WS2 monolayer, respectively.
  • Using time-resolved Kerr rotation, we measure the spin/valley dynamics of resident electrons and holes in single charge-tunable monolayers of the archetypal transition-metal dichalcogenide (TMD) semiconductor WSe2. In the n-type regime, we observe long (70 ns) polarization relaxation of electrons that is sensitive to in-plane magnetic fields $B_y$, indicating spin relaxation. In marked contrast, extraordinarily long (2 microsecond) polarization relaxation of holes is revealed in the p-type regime, that is unaffected by $B_y$, directly confirming long-standing expectations of strong spin-valley locking of holes in the valence band of monolayer TMDs. Supported by continuous-wave Kerr spectroscopy and Hanle measurements, these studies provide a unified picture of carrier polarization dynamics in monolayer TMDs, which can guide design principles for future valleytronic devices.
  • We demonstrate the detection of coherent electron-nuclear spin oscillations related to the hyperfine interaction and revealed by the band-to-band photoluminescence (PL) in zero external magnetic field. On the base of a pump-probe PL experiment we measure, directly in the temporal domain, the hyperfine constant of an electron coupled to a gallium defect in GaAsN by tracing the dynamical behavior of the conduction electron spin-dependent recombination to the defect site. The hyperfine constants and the relative abundance of the nuclei isotopes involved can be determined without the need of electron spin resonance technique and in the absence of any magnetic field. Information on the nuclear and electron spin relaxation damping parameters can also be estimated from the oscillations damping and the long delay behavior.
  • The strong light matter interaction and the valley selective optical selection rules make monolayer (ML) MoS2 an exciting 2D material for fundamental physics and optoelectronics applications. But so far optical transition linewidths even at low temperature are typically as large as a few tens of meV and contain homogenous and inhomogeneous contributions. This prevented in-depth studies, in contrast to the better-characterized ML materials MoSe2 and WSe2. In this work we show that encapsulation of ML MoS2 in hexagonal boron nitride can efficiently suppress the inhomogeneous contribution to the exciton linewidth, as we measure in photoluminescence and reflectivity a FWHM down to 2 meV at T = 4K. This indicates that surface protection and substrate flatness are key ingredients for obtaining stable, high quality samples. Among the new possibilities offered by the well-defined optical transitions we measure the homogeneous broadening induced by the interaction with phonons in temperature dependent experiments. We uncover new information on spin and valley physics and present the rotation of valley coherence in applied magnetic fields perpendicular to the ML.
  • Excitons, Coulomb bound electron-hole pairs, are composite bosons and their interactions in traditional semiconductors lead to condensation and light amplification. The much stronger Coulomb interaction in transition metal dichalcogenides such as WSe$_2$ monolayers combined with the presence of the valley degree of freedom is expected to provide new opportunities for controlling excitonic effects. But so far the bosonic character of exciton scattering processes remains largely unexplored in these two-dimensional (2D) materials. Here we show that scattering between B-excitons and A-excitons preferably happens within the same valley in momentum space. This leads to power dependent, negative polarization of the hot B-exciton emission. We use a selective upconversion technique for efficient generation of B-excitons in the presence of resonantly excited A-excitons at lower energy, we also observe the excited A-excitons state $2s$. Detuning of the continuous wave, low power laser excitation outside the A-exciton resonance (with a full width at half maximum of 4 meV) results in vanishing upconversion signal.
  • Optical properties of transition metal dichalcogenides monolayers are controlled by the Wannier-Mott excitons forming a series of $1s$, $2s$, $2p$,... hydrogen-like states. We develop the theory of the excited excitonic states energy spectrum fine structure. We predict that $p$- and $s$-shell excitons are mixed due to the specific $D_{3h}$ point symmetry of the transition metal dichalcogenide monolayers. Hence, both $s$- and $p$-shell excitons are active in both single- and two-photon processes providing an efficient mechanism of second harmonic generation. The corresponding contribution to the nonlinear susceptibility is calculated.
  • Similar to nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond and impurity atoms in silicon, interstitial gallium deep paramagnetic centers in GaAsN have been proven to have useful characteristics for the development of spintronic devices. Among other interesting properties, under circularly polarized light, gallium centers in GaAsN act as spin filters that dynamically polarize free and bound electrons reaching record spin polarizations (100\%). Furthermore, the recent observation of the amplification of the spin filtering effect under a Faraday configuration magnetic field has suggested that the hyperfine interaction that couples bound electrons and nuclei permits the optical manipulation of its nuclear spin polarization. Even though the mechanisms behind the nuclear spin polarization in gallium centers are fairly well understood, the origin of nuclear spin relaxation and the formation of an Overhauser-like magnetic field remain elusive. In this work we develop a model based on the master equation approach to describe the evolution of electronic and nuclear spin polarizations of gallium centers interacting with free electrons and holes. Our results are in good agreement with existing experimental observations. In regard to the nuclear spin relaxation, the roles of nuclear dipolar and quadrupolar interactions are discussed. Our findings show that, besides the hyperfine interaction, the spin relaxation mechanisms are key to understand the amplification of the spin filtering effect and the appearance of the Overhauser-like magnetic field. Based on our model's results we propose an experimental protocol based on time resolved spectroscopy. It consists of a pump-probe photoluminescence scheme that would allow the detection and the tracing of the electron-nucleus flip-flops through time resolved PL measurements.
  • MoTe2 belongs to the semiconducting transition metal dichalcogenide family with some properties differing from the other well-studied members (Mo,W)(S,Se)2. The optical band gap is in the near infrared region and both monolayers and bilayers may have a direct optical band gap. We first simulate the band structure of both monolayer and bilayer MoTe2 with DFT-GW calculations. We find a direct (indirect) electronic band gap for the monolayer (bilayer). By solving the Bethe-Salpeter equation, we calculate similar energies for the direct excitonic states in monolayer and bilayer. We then study the optical properties by means of photoluminescence (PL) excitation, time-resolved PL and power dependent PL spectroscopy. We identify the same energy for the B exciton state in monolayer and bilayer. Following circularly polarized excitation, we do not find any exciton polarization for a large range of excitation energies. At low temperature (T=10 K), we measure similar PL decay times of the order of 4 ps for both monolayer and bilayer excitons with a slightly longer one for the bilayer. Finally, we observe a reduction of the exciton-exciton annihilation contribution to the non-radiative recombination in bilayer.
  • The direct gap interband transitions in transition metal dichalcogenides monolayers are governed by chiral optical selection rules. Determined by laser helicity, optical transitions in either the $K^+$ or $K^-$ valley in momentum space are induced. Linearly polarized laser excitation prepares a coherent superposition of valley states. Here we demonstrate the control of the exciton valley coherence in monolayer WSe2 by tuning the applied magnetic field perpendicular to the monolayer plane. We show rotation of this coherent superposition of valley states by angles as large as 30 degrees in applied fields up to 9 T. This exciton valley coherence control on ps time scale could be an important step towards complete control of qubits based on the valley degree of freedom.
  • In self assembled III-V semiconductor quantum dots, valence holes have longer spin coherence times than the conduction electrons, due to their weaker coupling to nuclear spin bath fluctuations. Prolonging hole spin stability relies on a better understanding of the hole to nuclear spin hyperfine coupling which we address both in experiment and theory in the symmetric (111) GaAs/AlGaAs droplet dots. In magnetic fields applied along the growth axis, we create a strong nuclear spin polarization detected through the positively charged trion X$^+$ Zeeman and Overhauser splittings. The observation of four clearly resolved photoluminescence lines - a unique property of the (111) nanosystems - allows us to measure separately the electron and hole contribution to the Overhauser shift. The hyperfine interaction for holes is found to be about five times weaker than that for electrons. Our theory shows that this ratio depends not only on intrinsic material properties but also on the dot shape and carrier confinement through the heavy-hole mixing, an opportunity for engineering the hole-nuclear spin interaction by tuning dot size and shape.
  • We have investigated the exciton dynamics in transition metal dichalcogenide mono-layers using time-resolved photoluminescence experiments performed with optimized time-resolution. For MoSe2 monolayers, we measure $\tau_{rad}=1.8\pm0.2$ ps that we interpret as the intrinsic radiative recombination time. Similar values are found for WSe2 mono-layers. Our detailed analysis suggests the following scenario: at low temperature (T $\leq$ 50 K), the exciton oscillator strength is so large that the entire light can be emitted before the time required for the establishment of a thermalized exciton distribution. For higher lattice temperatures, the photoluminescence dynamics is characterized by two regimes with very different characteristic times. First the PL intensity drops drastically with a decay time in the range of the picosecond driven by the escape of excitons from the radiative window due to exciton- phonon interactions. Following this first non-thermal regime, a thermalized exciton population is established gradually yielding longer photoluminescence decay times in the nanosecond range. Both the exciton effective radiative recombination and non-radiative recombination channels including exciton-exciton annihilation control the latter. Finally the temperature dependence of the measured exciton and trion dynamics indicates that the two populations are not in thermodynamical equilibrium.
  • The optical properties of transition metal dichalcogenide monolayers such as the two-dimensional semiconductors MoS$_2$ and WSe$_2$ are dominated by excitons, Coulomb bound electron-hole pairs. The light emission yield depends on whether the electron-hole transitions are optically allowed (bright) or forbidden (dark). By solving the Bethe Salpeter Equation on top of $GW$ wave functions in density functional theory calculations, we determine the sign and amplitude of the splitting between bright and dark exciton states. We evaluate the influence of the spin-orbit coupling on the optical spectra and clearly demonstrate the strong impact of the intra-valley Coulomb exchange term on the dark-bright exciton fine structure splitting.
  • Molybdenum disulfide has recently emerged as a promising two-dimensional semiconducting material for nano-electronic, opto-electronic and spintronic applications. However, demonstrating spin-transport through a semiconducting MoS2 channel is challenging. Here we demonstrate the electrical spin injection and detection in a multilayer MoS2 semiconducting channel. A magnetoresistance (MR) around 1% has been observed at low temperature through a 450nm long, 6 monolayer thick channel with a Co/MgO spin injector and detector. From a systematic study of the bias voltage, temperature and back-gate voltage dependence of MR, it is found that the hopping via localized states in the contact depletion region plays a key role for the observation of the two-terminal MR. Moreover, the electron spin-relaxation is found to be greatly suppressed in the multilayer MoS2 channel for in-plan spin injection. The underestimated long spin diffusion length (~235nm) and large spin lifetime (~46ns) open a new avenue for spintronic applications using multilayer transition metal dichalcogenides.
  • We present a combined experimental and theoretical study of highly charged and excited electron-hole complexes in strain-free (111) GaAs/AlGaAs quantum dots grown by droplet epitaxy. We address the complexes with one of the charge carriers residing in the excited state, namely, the ``hot'' trions X$^{-*}$ and X$^{+*}$, and the doubly negatively charged exciton X$^{2-}$. Our magneto-photoluminescence experiments performed on single quantum dots in the Faraday geometry uncover characteristic emission patterns for each excited electron-hole complex, which are very different from the photoluminescence spectra observed in (001)-grown quantum dots. We present a detailed theory of the fine structure and magneto-photoluminescence spectra of X$^{-*}$, X$^{+*}$ and X$^{2-}$ complexes, governed by the interplay between the electron-hole Coulomb exchange interaction and the heavy-hole mixing, characteristic for these quantum dots with a trigonal symmetry. Comparison between experiment and theory of the magneto-photoluminescence allows for precise charge state identification, as well as extraction of electron-hole exchange interaction constants and $g$-factors for the charge carriers occupying excited states.
  • Monolayers of transition metal dichalcogenides, namely, molybdenum and tungsten disulfides and diselenides demonstrate unusual optical properties related to the spin-valley locking effect. Particularly, excitation of monolayers by circularly polarized light selectively creates electron-hole pairs or excitons in non-equivalent valleys in momentum space, depending on the light helicity. This allows studying the inter-valley dynamics of charge carriers and Coulomb complexes by means of optical spectroscopy. Here we present a concise review of the neutral exciton fine structure and its spin and valley dynamics in monolayers of transition metal dichalcogenides. It is demonstrated that the long-range exchange interaction between an electron and a hole in the exciton is an efficient mechanism for rapid mixing between bright excitons made of electron-hole pairs in different valleys. We discuss the physical origin of the long-range exchange interaction and outline its derivation in both the electrodynamical and $\mathbf k \cdot \mathbf p$ approaches. We further present a model of bright exciton spin dynamics driven by an interplay between the long-range exchange interaction and scattering. Finally, we discuss the application of the model to describe recent experimental data obtained by time-resolved photoluminescence and Kerr rotation techniques.
  • The electronic states at the direct band gap of monolayer WSe2 at the $K^+$ and $K^-$ valleys are related by time reversal and may be viewed as pseudo-spins. The corresponding optical interband transitions are governed by robust excitons. In double resonant Raman spectroscopy, we uncover that the 2s exciton state energy differs from the 1s state energy by exactly the energy of the combination of several prominent phonons. Superimposed on the exciton photoluminescence (PL) we observe the double resonant Raman signal. This spectrally narrow peak shifts with the excitation laser energy as incoming photons match the 2s and outgoing photons the 1s exciton transition. The multi-phonon resonance has important consequences: Following linearly polarized excitation of the 2s exciton a superposition of valley states is generated which can relax fast via phonon emission and with minimal loss of coherence from the 2s to 1s state. This explains the high degree of valley coherence measured for the 1s exciton PL.
  • We combine linear and non-linear optical spectroscopy at 4K with ab initio calculations to study the electronic bandstructure of MoSe2 monolayers. In 1-photon photoluminescence excitation (PLE) and reflectivity we measure a separation between the A- and B-exciton emission of 220 meV. In 2-photon PLE we detect for the A- and B-exciton the 2p state 180meV above the respective 1s state. In second harmonic generation (SHG) spectroscopy we record an enhancement by more than 2 orders of magnitude of the SHG signal at resonances of the charged exciton and the 1s and 2p neutral A- and B-exciton. Our post-Density Functional Theory calculations show in the conduction band along the $K-\Gamma$ direction a local minimum that is energetically and in k-space close to the global minimum at the K-point. This has a potentially strong impact on the polarization and energy of the excitonic states that govern the interband transitions and marks an important difference to MoS2 and WSe2 monolayers.