• The optical observations of Ic-4 supernova (SN) 2016coi/ASASSN-16fp, from $\sim 2$ to $\sim450$ days after explosion, are presented along with analysis of its physical properties. The SN shows the broad lines associated with SNe Ic-3/4 but with a key difference. The early spectra display a strong absorption feature at $\sim 5400$ \AA\ which is not seen in other SNe~Ic-3/4 at this epoch. This feature has been attributed to He I in the literature. Spectral modelling of the SN in the early photospheric phase suggests the presence of residual He in a C/O dominated shell. However, the behaviour of the He I lines are unusual when compared with He-rich SNe, showing relatively low velocities and weakening rather than strengthening over time. The SN is found to rise to peak $\sim 16$ d after core-collapse reaching a bolometric luminosity of Lp $\sim 3\times10^{42}$ \ergs. Spectral models, including the nebular epoch, show that the SN ejected $2.5-4$ \msun\ of material, with $\sim 1.5$ \msun\ below 5000 \kms, and with a kinetic energy of $(4.5-7)\times10^{51}$ erg. The explosion synthesised $\sim 0.14$ \msun\ of 56Ni. There are significant uncertainties in E(B-V)host and the distance however, which will affect Lp and MNi. SN 2016coi exploded in a host similar to the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) and away from star-forming regions. The properties of the SN and the host-galaxy suggest that the progenitor had $M_\mathrm{ZAMS}$ of $23-28$ \msun\ and was stripped almost entirely down to its C/O core at explosion.
  • We present extensive ultraviolet (UV) and optical photometry, as well as dense optical spectroscopy for type II Plateau (IIP) supernova SN 2016X that exploded in the nearby ($\sim$ 15 Mpc) spiral galaxy UGC 08041. The observations span the period from 2 to 180 days after the explosion; in particular, the Swift UV data probably captured the signature of shock breakout associated with the explosion of SN 2016X. It shows very strong UV emission during the first week after explosion, with contribution of $\sim$ 20 -- 30% to the bolometric luminosity (versus $\lesssim$ 15% for normal SNe IIP). Moreover, we found that this supernova has an unusually long rise time of about 12.6 $\pm$ 0.5 days in the $R$ band (versus $\sim$ 7.0 days for typical SNe IIP). The optical light curves and spectral evolution are quite similar to the fast-declining type IIP object SN 2013ej, except that SN 2016X has a relatively brighter tail. Based on the evolution of photospheric temperature as inferred from the $Swift$ data in the early phase, we derive that the progenitor of SN 2016X has a radius of about 930 $\pm$ 70 R$_{\odot}$. This large-size star is expected to be a red supergiant star with an initial mass of $\gtrsim$ 19 -- 20 M$_{\odot}$ based on the mass $--$ radius relation of the Galactic red supergiants, and it represents one of the most largest and massive progenitors found for SNe IIP.
  • We present spectroscopic and photometric data of the Type Ibn supernova (SN) 2014av, discovered by the Xingming Observatory Sky Survey. Stringent pre-discovery detection limits indicate that the object was detected for the first time about 4 days after the explosion. A prompt follow-up campaign arranged by amateur astronomers allowed us to monitor the rising phase (lasting 10.6 days) and to accurately estimate the epoch of the maximum light, on 2014 April 23 (JD = 2456771.1 +/- 1.2). The absolute magnitude of the SN at the maximum light is M(R) = -19.76 +/- 0.16. The post-peak light curve shows an initial fast decline lasting about 3 weeks, and is followed by a slower decline in all bands until the end of the monitoring campaign. The spectra are initially characterized by a hot continuum. Later on, the temperature declines and a number of lines become prominent mostly in emission. In particular, later spectra are dominated by strong and narrow emission features of He I typical of Type Ibn supernovae (SNe), although there is a clear signature of lines from heavier elements (in particular O I, Mg II and Ca II). A forest of relatively narrow Fe II lines is also detected showing P-Cygni profiles, with the absorption component blue-shifted by about 1200 km/s. Another spectral feature often observed in interacting SNe, a strong blue pseudo-continuum, is seen in our latest spectra of SN 2014av. We discuss in this paper the physical parameters of SN 2014av in the context of the Type Ibn supernova variety.