• We study the transport of chiral Majorana edge modes (CMEMs) in a hybrid quantum anomalous Hall insulator-topological superconductor (QAHI-TSC) system in which the TSC region contains a Josephson junction and a cavity. The Josephson junction undergoes a topological transition when the magnetic flux through the cavity passes through half-integer multiples of magnetic flux quantum. For the trivial phase, the CMEMs transmit along the QAHI-TSC interface as without magnetic flux. However, for the nontrivial phase, a zero-energy Majorana state appears in the cavity, leading that a CMEM can resonantly tunnel through the Majorana state to a different CMEM. These findings may provide a feasible scheme to control the transport of CMEMs by using the magnetic flux and the transport pattern can be customized by setting the size of the TSC.
  • The surface states in three-dimensional (3D) topological insulators (TIs) can be described by a two-dimensional (2D) continuous Dirac Hamiltonian. However, there exists the Fermion doubling problem when putting the continuous 2D Dirac equation into a lattice model. In this letter, we introduce a Wilson term with a zero bare mass into the 2D lattice model to overcome the difficulty. By comparing with a 3D Hamiltonian, we show that the modified 2D lattice model can faithfully describe the low-energy electrical and transport properties of surface states of 3D TIs. So this 2D lattice model provides a simple and cheap way to numerically simulate the surface states of 3D TI nanostructures. Based on the 2D lattice model, we also establish the wormhole effect in a TI nanowire by a magnetic field along the wire and show the surface states being robust against disorder. The proposed 2D lattice model can be extensively applied to study the various properties and effects, such as the transport properties, Hall effect, universal conductance fluctuations, localization effect, etc.. So it paves a new way to study the surface states of the 3D topological insulators.
  • In the history of condensed matter physics, reinvestigation of a well-studied material with enhanced quality sometimes led to important scientific discoveries. A well-known example is the discovery of fractional quantum Hall effect in high quality GaAs/AlGaAs heterojunctions. Here we report the first single crystal growth and magnetoresistance (MR) measurements of the silver chalcogenide $\beta $-Ag$_2$Se (Naumannite), a compound has been known for the unusual, linear-field-dependent MR in its polycrystalline form for over a decade. With the quantum limit (QL) as low as 3 Tesla, a moderate field produced by a superconductor magnet available in many laboratories can easily drive the electrons in Ag$_2$Se to an unprecedented state. We observed significant negative longitudinal MR beyond the QL, which was understood as a `charge-pumping' effect between the novel fermions with opposite chiralities. Characterization of the single-crystalline Ag$_2$Se and the fabrication of electric devices working above the QL, will represent a new direction for the study of these exotic electrons.
  • Low energy excitation of surface states of a three-dimensional topological insulator (3DTI) can be described by Dirac fermions. By using a tight-binding model, the transport properties of the surface states in a uniform magnetic field is investigated. It is found that chiral surface states parallel to the magnetic field are responsible to the quantized Hall (QH) conductance $(2n+1)\frac{e^2}{h}$ multiplied by the number of Dirac cones. Due to the two-dimension (2D) nature of the surface states, the robustness of the QH conductance against impurity scattering is determined by the oddness and evenness of the Dirac cone number. An experimental setup for transport measurement is proposed.
  • We investigate the interplay between the strong correlation and the spin-orbital coupling in the Kane-Mele-Hubbard model and obtain the qualitative phase diagram via the variational cluster approach. We identify, through an increase of the Hubbard $U$, the transition from the topological band insulator to either the spin liquid phase or the easy-plane antiferromagnetic insulating phase, depending on the strength of the spin-orbit coupling. A nontrivial evolution of the bulk bands in the topological quantum phase transition is also demonstrated.
  • By using the full density matrix approach to spectral functions within the numerical renormalization group method, we present a detailed study of the magnetic field induced splittings in the spin-resolved and the total spectral densities of a Kondo correlated quantum dot described by the single level Anderson impurity model. The universal scaling of the splittings with magnetic field is examined by varying the Kondo scale either by a change of local level position at a fixed tunnel coupling or by a change of the tunnel coupling at a fixed level position. We find that the Kondo-peak splitting $\Delta/T_K$ in the spin-resolved spectral function always scales perfectly for magnetic fields $B<8T_K$ in either of the two $T_K$-adjusted paths. Scaling is destroyed for fields $B>10T_K$. On the other hand, the Kondo peak splitting $\delta/T_K$ in the total spectral function does slightly deviate from the conventional scaling theory in whole magnetic field window along the coupling-varying path. Furthermore, we show the scaling analysis suitable for all field windows within the Kondo regime and two specific fitting scaling curves are given from which certain detailed features at low field are derived. In addition, the scaling dimensionless quantity $\Delta/2B$ and $\delta/2B$ are also studied and they can reach and exceed 1 in the large magnetic field region, in agreement with a recent experiment [T.M. Liu, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 026803 (2009)].
  • The intrinsic spin-orbit coupling (ISOC) in bilayer graphene is investigated. We find that the largest ISOC between $\pi$ electrons origins from the following hopping processes: a $\pi$ electron hops to $\sigma$ orbits of the other layer and further to $\pi$ orbits with the opposite spin through the intra-atomic ISOC. The magnitude of this ISOC is about $0.46meV$, 100 times larger than that of the monolayer graphene. The Hamiltonians including this ISOC in both momentum and real spaces are derived. Due to this ISOC, the low-energy states around the Dirac point exhibit a special spin polarization, in which the electron spins are oppositely polarized in the upper and lower layers. This spin polarization state is robust, protected by the time-reversal symmetry. In addition, we provide a hybrid system to select a certain spin polarization state by an electric manipulation.
  • The recent theoretical prediction and experimental realization of topological insulators (TI) has generated intense interest in this new state of quantum matter. The surface states of a three-dimensional (3D) TI such as Bi_2Te_3, Bi_2Se_3 and Sb_2Te_3 consist of a single massless Dirac cones. Crossing of the two surface state branches with opposite spins in the materials is fully protected by the time reversal (TR) symmetry at the Dirac points, which cannot be destroyed by any TR invariant perturbation. Recent advances in thin-film growth have permitted this unique two-dimensional electron system (2DES) to be probed by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and spectroscopy (STS). The intriguing TR symmetry protected topological states were revealed in STM experiments where the backscattering induced by non-magnetic impurities was forbidden. Here we report the Landau quantization of the topological surface states in Bi_2Se_3 in magnetic field by using STM/STS. The direct observation of the discrete Landau levels (LLs) strongly supports the 2D nature of the topological states and gives direct proof of the nondegenerate structure of LLs in TI. We demonstrate the linear dispersion of the massless Dirac fermions by the square-root dependence of LLs on magnetic field. The formation of LLs implies the high mobility of the 2DES, which has been predicted to lead to topological magneto-electric effect of the TI.
  • We predict a quantum spin Hall effect (QSHE) in the ferromagnetic graphene under a magnetic field. Unlike the previous QSHE, this QSHE appears in the absence of any spin-orbit interaction, thus, arrived from a different physical origin. The previous QSHE is protected by the time-reversal (T) invariance. This new QSHE is protected by the CT invariance, where C is the charge conjugation operation. Due to this QSHE, the longitudinal resistance exhibits quantum plateaus. The plateau values are at 1/2, 1/6, 3/28, ..., (in the unit of $h/e^2$), depending on the filling factors of the spin-up and spin-down carriers. The spin Hall resistance is also investigated and is found to be robust against the disorder.
  • The electron transport through a three-terminal single-molecular transistor (SMT) is theoretically studied. We find that the differential conductance of the third and weakly coupled terminal versus its voltage matches well with the spectral function versus the energy when certain conditions are met. Particularly, this excellent matching is maintained even for complicated structure of the phonon-assisted side peaks. Thus, this device offers an experimental approach to explore the shape of the phonon-assisted spectral function in detail. In addition we discuss the conditions of a perfect matching. The results show that at low temperatures the matching survives regardless of the bias and the energy levels of the SMT. However, at high temperatures, the matching is destroyed.
  • We withdraw the paper because the results are wrong.
  • Following a previous work [Shen, Ma, Xie and Zhang, Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 256603 (2004)] on the resonant spin Hall effect, we present detailed calculations of the spin Hall conductance in two-dimensional quantum wells in a strong perpendicular magnetic field. The Rashba coupling, generated by spin-orbit interaction in wells lacking bulk inversion symmetry, introduces a degeneracy of Zeeman-split Landau levels at certain magnetic fields. This degeneracy, if occuring at the Fermi energy, will induce a resonance in the spin Hall conductance below a characteristic temperature of order of the Zeeman energy. At very low temperatures, the spin Hall current is highly non-ohmic. The Dresselhaus coupling due to the lack of structure inversion symmetry partially or completely suppresses the spin Hall resonance. The condition for the resonant spin Hall conductance in the presence of both Rashba and Dresselhaus couplings is derived using a perturbation method. In the presence of disorder, we argue that the resonant spin Hall conductance occurs when the two Zeeman split extended states near the Fermi level becomes degenerate due to the Rashba coupling and that the the quantized charge Hall conductance changes by 2e^2/h instead of e^2/h as the magnetic field changes through the resonant field.
  • We investigate the transmission of electrons through a quantum point contact by using a quasi-one-dimensional model with a local bound state below the band bottom. While the complete transmission in lower channels gives rise to plateaus of conductance at multiples of $2e^{2}/h$, the electrons in the lowest channel are scattered by the local bound state when it is singly occupied. This scattering produces a wide zero-transmittance (anti-resonance) for a singlet formed by tunneling and local electrons, and has no effect on triplets, leading to an exact $0.75(2e^{2}/h)$ shoulder prior to the first $2e^{2}/h$ plateau. Formation of a Kondo singlet from electrons in the Fermi sea screens the local moment and reduces the effects of anti-resonance, complementing the shoulder from 0.75 to 1 at low temperatures.
  • We propose a novel method for the creation of spatially-separated spin entanglement by means of adiabatic passage of an external gate voltage in a triple quantum dot system.
  • Non-equilibrium spin transport through an interacting quantum dot is analyzed. The coherent spin oscillations in the dot provide a generating source for spin current. In the interacting regime, the Kondo effect is influenced in a significant way by the presence of the precessing magnetic field. In particular, when the precession frequency is tuned to resonance between spin up and spin down states of the dot, Kondo singularity for each spin splits into a superposition of two resonance peaks. The Kondo-type cotunneling contribution is manifested by a large enhancement of the pumped spin current in the strong coupling, low temperature regime.
  • We propose that the indirect adatom-adatom interaction mediated by the conduction electrons of a metallic surface is responsible for the $\sqrt{3}\times \sqrt{3}\Leftrightarrow 3\times 3$ structural phase transitions observed in Sn/Ge (111) and Pb/Ge (111). When the indirect interaction overwhelms the local stress field imposed by the substrate registry, the system suffers a phonon instability, resulting in a structural phase transition in the adlayer. Our theory is capable of explaining all the salient features of the $\sqrt{3}\times \sqrt{3}\Leftrightarrow 3\times 3$ transitions observed in Sn/Ge (111) and Pb/Ge (111), and is in principle applicable to a wide class of systems whose surfaces are metallic before the transition.
  • We demonstrate that the radiation induced "zero-resistance state" observed in a two-dimensional electron gas is a result of the non-trivial structure of the density of states of the systems and the photon assisted transport. A toy model of a structureless quantum tunneling junction where the system has oscillatory density of states catches most of the important features of the experiments. We present a generalized Kubo-Greenwood conductivity formula for the photon assisted transport in a general system, and show essentially the same nature of the transport anomaly in a uniform system.
  • We show that the comment by A.F. Volkov ignores a delicate issue in the conductance measurement for a hall bar system. In such system, $\rho _{xx}\approx \rho_{xy}^{2}\sigma_{xx}$ while $\sigma_{xy}\gg \sigma_{xx}$, as correctly pointed out in Ref.3. We clarify that the so called "zero resistance state" is actually a "zero conductance state". A discussion concerning the phase transition induced by the negative conductance is presented.
  • We investigate the dynamics of two interacting electrons in coupled quantum dots driven by an AC field. We find that the two electrons can be trapped in one of the dots by the AC field, in spite of the strong Coulomb repulsion. In particular, we find that the interaction may enhance the localization effect. We also demonstrate the field excitation procedure to generate the maximally entangled Bell states. The generation time is determined by both analytic and numerical solutions of the time dependent Schrodinger equation.
  • We study the nonequilibrium spin transport through a quantum dot containing two spin levels coupled to the magnetic electrodes. A formula for the spin-dependent current is obtained and is applied to discuss the linear conductance and magnetoresistance in the interacting regime, where the so-called Kondo effect arises. We show that the Kondo resonance and the correlation-induced spin splitting of the dot levels may be systematically controlled by internal magnetization in the electrodes. As a result, when the electrodes are in parallel magnetic configuration, the linear conductance is characterized by two spin-resolved peaks. Furthermore, the presence of the spin-flip process in the dot splits the Kondo resonance into three peaks.
  • This paper has been withdrawn by the authors, since the reference citation were not appropriately arranged.
  • We analyze dephasing in single and double quantum dot systems. The decoherence is introduced by the B\"{u}ttiker model with current conserving fictitious voltage leads connected to the dots. By using the non-equilibrium Green function method, we investigate the dephasing effect on the tunneling current. It is shown that a finite dephasing rate leads to observable effects. The result can be used to measure dephasing rates in quantum dots.
  • Recent experiments have shown that some colossal magnetoresistance (CMR) materials exhibit a percolation transition. The conductivity exponent varies substantially with or without an external magnetic field. This finding prompted us to carry out theoretical studies of percolation transition in CMR systems. We find that the percolation transition coincides with the magnetic transition and this causes a large effect of a magnetic field on the percolation transition. Using real-space-renormalization method and numerical calculations for two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) models, we obtain the conductivity exponent $t$ to be 5.3 (3D) and 3.3 (2D) without a magnetic field, and 1.7 (3D) and 1.4 (2D) with a magnetic field.
  • It is well known that the dielectric constant of two-dimensional (2D) electron system goes negative at low electron densities. A consequence of the negative dielectric constant could be the formation of the droplet state. The droplet state is a two-phase coexistence region of high density liquid and low density "gas". In this paper, we carry out energetic calculations to study the stability of the droplet ground state. The possible relevance of the droplet state to recently observed 2D metal-insulator transition is also discussed.
  • We study the localization properties in coupled double quantum wells with an in-plane magnetic field. The localization length is directly calculated using a transfer matrix technique and finite size scaling analysis. We show that the system maps into a 2D XY model and undergoes a disorder driven Kosterlitz-Thouless type metal-insulator transition depending on the coupling strength between the two-dimensional layers and the magnitude of the in-plane magnetic field. For a system with fixed disorder, the metallic regime appears to be a window in the magnetic field - coupling strength plane. Experimental implications of the transition will be discussed.