• We present Deeply Supervised Object Detector (DSOD), a framework that can learn object detectors from scratch. State-of-the-art object objectors rely heavily on the off-the-shelf networks pre-trained on large-scale classification datasets like ImageNet, which incurs learning bias due to the difference on both the loss functions and the category distributions between classification and detection tasks. Model fine-tuning for the detection task could alleviate this bias to some extent but not fundamentally. Besides, transferring pre-trained models from classification to detection between discrepant domains is even more difficult (e.g. RGB to depth images). A better solution to tackle these two critical problems is to train object detectors from scratch, which motivates our proposed DSOD. Previous efforts in this direction mostly failed due to much more complicated loss functions and limited training data in object detection. In DSOD, we contribute a set of design principles for training object detectors from scratch. One of the key findings is that deep supervision, enabled by dense layer-wise connections, plays a critical role in learning a good detector. Combining with several other principles, we develop DSOD following the single-shot detection (SSD) framework. Experiments on PASCAL VOC 2007, 2012 and MS COCO datasets demonstrate that DSOD can achieve better results than the state-of-the-art solutions with much more compact models. For instance, DSOD outperforms SSD on all three benchmarks with real-time detection speed, while requires only 1/2 parameters to SSD and 1/10 parameters to Faster RCNN. Our code and models are available at: https://github.com/szq0214/DSOD .
  • A fundamental problem with few-shot learning is the scarcity of data in training. A natural solution to alleviate this scarcity is to augment the existing images for each training class. However, directly augmenting samples in image space may not necessarily, nor sufficiently, explore the intra-class variation. To this end, we propose to directly synthesize instance features by leveraging the semantics of each class. Essentially, a novel auto-encoder network dual TriNet, is proposed for feature augmentation. The encoder TriNet projects multi-layer visual features of deep CNNs into the semantic space. In this space, data augmentation is induced, and the augmented instance representation is projected back into the image feature spaces by the decoder TriNet. Two data argumentation strategies in the semantic space are explored; notably these seemingly simple augmentations in semantic space result in complex augmented feature distributions in the image feature space, resulting in substantially better performance. The code and models of our paper will be published on: https://github.com/tankche1/Semantic-Feature-Augmentation-in-Few-shot-Learning.
  • Person Re-identification (re-id) faces two major challenges: the lack of cross-view paired training data and learning discriminative identity-sensitive and view-invariant features in the presence of large pose variations. In this work, we address both problems by proposing a novel deep person image generation model for synthesizing realistic person images conditional on the pose. The model is based on a generative adversarial network (GAN) designed specifically for pose normalization in re-id, thus termed pose-normalization GAN (PN-GAN). With the synthesized images, we can learn a new type of deep re-id feature free of the influence of pose variations. We show that this feature is strong on its own and complementary to features learned with the original images. Importantly, under the transfer learning setting, we show that our model generalizes well to any new re-id dataset without the need for collecting any training data for model fine-tuning. The model thus has the potential to make re-id model truly scalable.
  • This paper targets at learning to score the figure skating sports videos. To address this task, we propose a deep architecture that includes two complementary components, i.e., Self-Attentive LSTM and Multi-scale Convolutional Skip LSTM. These two components can efficiently learn the local and global sequential information in each video. Furthermore, we present a large-scale figure skating sports video dataset -- FisV dataset. This dataset includes 500 figure skating videos with the average length of 2 minutes and 50 seconds. Each video is annotated by two scores of nine different referees, i.e., Total Element Score(TES) and Total Program Component Score (PCS). Our proposed model is validated on FisV and MIT-skate datasets. The experimental results show the effectiveness of our models in learning to score the figure skating videos.
  • Inspired by the recent neuroscience studies on the left-right asymmetry of the human brain in processing low and high spatial frequency information, this paper introduces a dual skipping network which carries out coarse-to-fine object categorization. Such a network has two branches to simultaneously deal with both coarse and fine-grained classification tasks. Specifically, we propose a layer-skipping mechanism that learns a gating network to predict which layers to skip in the testing stage. This layer-skipping mechanism endows the network with good flexibility and capability in practice. Evaluations are conducted on several widely used coarse-to-fine object categorization benchmarks, and promising results are achieved by our proposed network model.
  • This paper introduces a novel rotation-based framework for arbitrary-oriented text detection in natural scene images. We present the Rotation Region Proposal Networks (RRPN), which are designed to generate inclined proposals with text orientation angle information. The angle information is then adapted for bounding box regression to make the proposals more accurately fit into the text region in terms of the orientation. The Rotation Region-of-Interest (RRoI) pooling layer is proposed to project arbitrary-oriented proposals to a feature map for a text region classifier. The whole framework is built upon a region-proposal-based architecture, which ensures the computational efficiency of the arbitrary-oriented text detection compared with previous text detection systems. We conduct experiments using the rotation-based framework on three real-world scene text detection datasets and demonstrate its superiority in terms of effectiveness and efficiency over previous approaches.
  • In this paper, we study the challenging problem of categorizing videos according to high-level semantics such as the existence of a particular human action or a complex event. Although extensive efforts have been devoted in recent years, most existing works combined multiple video features using simple fusion strategies and neglected the utilization of inter-class semantic relationships. This paper proposes a novel unified framework that jointly exploits the feature relationships and the class relationships for improved categorization performance. Specifically, these two types of relationships are estimated and utilized by rigorously imposing regularizations in the learning process of a deep neural network (DNN). Such a regularized DNN (rDNN) can be efficiently realized using a GPU-based implementation with an affordable training cost. Through arming the DNN with better capability of harnessing both the feature and the class relationships, the proposed rDNN is more suitable for modeling video semantics. With extensive experimental evaluations, we show that rDNN produces superior performance over several state-of-the-art approaches. On the well-known Hollywood2 and Columbia Consumer Video benchmarks, we obtain very competitive results: 66.9\% and 73.5\% respectively in terms of mean average precision. In addition, to substantially evaluate our rDNN and stimulate future research on large scale video categorization, we collect and release a new benchmark dataset, called FCVID, which contains 91,223 Internet videos and 239 manually annotated categories.
  • The novel unseen classes can be formulated as the extreme values of known classes. This inspired the recent works on open-set recognition \cite{Scheirer_2013_TPAMI,Scheirer_2014_TPAMIb,EVM}, which however can have no way of naming the novel unseen classes. To solve this problem, we propose the Extreme Value Learning (EVL) formulation to learn the mapping from visual feature to semantic space. To model the margin and coverage distributions of each class, the Vocabulary-informed Learning (ViL) is adopted by using vast open vocabulary in the semantic space. Essentially, by incorporating the EVL and ViL, we for the first time propose a novel semantic embedding paradigm -- Vocabulary-informed Extreme Value Learning (ViEVL), which embeds the visual features into semantic space in a probabilistic way. The learned embedding can be directly used to solve supervised learning, zero-shot and open set recognition simultaneously. Experiments on two benchmark datasets demonstrate the effectiveness of proposed frameworks.
  • With the recent renaissance of deep convolution neural networks, encouraging breakthroughs have been achieved on the supervised recognition tasks, where each class has sufficient training data and fully annotated training data. However, to scale the recognition to a large number of classes with few or now training samples for each class remains an unsolved problem. One approach to scaling up the recognition is to develop models capable of recognizing unseen categories without any training instances, or zero-shot recognition/ learning. This article provides a comprehensive review of existing zero-shot recognition techniques covering various aspects ranging from representations of models, and from datasets and evaluation settings. We also overview related recognition tasks including one-shot and open set recognition which can be used as natural extensions of zero-shot recognition when limited number of class samples become available or when zero-shot recognition is implemented in a real-world setting. Importantly, we highlight the limitations of existing approaches and point out future research directions in this existing new research area.
  • Person Re-identification (re-id) aims to match people across non-overlapping camera views in a public space. It is a challenging problem because many people captured in surveillance videos wear similar clothes. Consequently, the differences in their appearance are often subtle and only detectable at the right location and scales. Existing re-id models, particularly the recently proposed deep learning based ones match people at a single scale. In contrast, in this paper, a novel multi-scale deep learning model is proposed. Our model is able to learn deep discriminative feature representations at different scales and automatically determine the most suitable scales for matching. The importance of different spatial locations for extracting discriminative features is also learned explicitly. Experiments are carried out to demonstrate that the proposed model outperforms the state-of-the art on a number of benchmarks
  • In this paper, we study the task of 3D human pose estimation in the wild. This task is challenging due to lack of training data, as existing datasets are either in the wild images with 2D pose or in the lab images with 3D pose. We propose a weakly-supervised transfer learning method that uses mixed 2D and 3D labels in a unified deep neutral network that presents two-stage cascaded structure. Our network augments a state-of-the-art 2D pose estimation sub-network with a 3D depth regression sub-network. Unlike previous two stage approaches that train the two sub-networks sequentially and separately, our training is end-to-end and fully exploits the correlation between the 2D pose and depth estimation sub-tasks. The deep features are better learnt through shared representations. In doing so, the 3D pose labels in controlled lab environments are transferred to in the wild images. In addition, we introduce a 3D geometric constraint to regularize the 3D pose prediction, which is effective in the absence of ground truth depth labels. Our method achieves competitive results on both 2D and 3D benchmarks.
  • Facial attribute analysis in the real world scenario is very challenging mainly because of complex face variations. Existing works of analyzing face attributes are mostly based on the cropped and aligned face images. However, this result in the capability of attribute prediction heavily relies on the preprocessing of face detector. To address this problem, we present a novel jointly learned deep architecture for both facial attribute analysis and face detection. Our framework can process the natural images in the wild and our experiments on CelebA and LFWA datasets clearly show that the state-of-the-art performance is obtained.
  • Videos are inherently multimodal. This paper studies the problem of how to fully exploit the abundant multimodal clues for improved video categorization. We introduce a hybrid deep learning framework that integrates useful clues from multiple modalities, including static spatial appearance information, motion patterns within a short time window, audio information as well as long-range temporal dynamics. More specifically, we utilize three Convolutional Neural Networks (CNNs) operating on appearance, motion and audio signals to extract their corresponding features. We then employ a feature fusion network to derive a unified representation with an aim to capture the relationships among features. Furthermore, to exploit the long-range temporal dynamics in videos, we apply two Long Short Term Memory networks with extracted appearance and motion features as inputs. Finally, we also propose to refine the prediction scores by leveraging contextual relationships among video semantics. The hybrid deep learning framework is able to exploit a comprehensive set of multimodal features for video classification. Through an extensive set of experiments, we demonstrate that (1) LSTM networks which model sequences in an explicitly recurrent manner are highly complementary with CNN models; (2) the feature fusion network which produces a fused representation through modeling feature relationships outperforms alternative fusion strategies; (3) the semantic context of video classes can help further refine the predictions for improved performance. Experimental results on two challenging benchmarks, the UCF-101 and the Columbia Consumer Videos (CCV), provide strong quantitative evidence that our framework achieves promising results: $93.1\%$ on the UCF-101 and $84.5\%$ on the CCV, outperforming competing methods with clear margins.
  • Generating and manipulating human facial images using high-level attributal controls are important and interesting problems. The models proposed in previous work can solve one of these two problems (generation or manipulation), but not both coherently. This paper proposes a novel model that learns how to both generate and modify the facial image from high-level semantic attributes. Our key idea is to formulate a Semi-Latent Facial Attribute Space (SL-FAS) to systematically learn relationship between user-defined and latent attributes, as well as between those attributes and RGB imagery. As part of this newly formulated space, we propose a new model --- SL-GAN which is a specific form of Generative Adversarial Network. Finally, we present an iterative training algorithm for SL-GAN. The experiments on recent CelebA and CASIA-WebFace datasets validate the effectiveness of our proposed framework. We will also make data, pre-trained models and code available.
  • This paper focuses on a novel and challenging vision task, dense video captioning, which aims to automatically describe a video clip with multiple informative and diverse caption sentences. The proposed method is trained without explicit annotation of fine-grained sentence to video region-sequence correspondence, but is only based on weak video-level sentence annotations. It differs from existing video captioning systems in three technical aspects. First, we propose lexical fully convolutional neural networks (Lexical-FCN) with weakly supervised multi-instance multi-label learning to weakly link video regions with lexical labels. Second, we introduce a novel submodular maximization scheme to generate multiple informative and diverse region-sequences based on the Lexical-FCN outputs. A winner-takes-all scheme is adopted to weakly associate sentences to region-sequences in the training phase. Third, a sequence-to-sequence learning based language model is trained with the weakly supervised information obtained through the association process. We show that the proposed method can not only produce informative and diverse dense captions, but also outperform state-of-the-art single video captioning methods by a large margin.
  • The aim of fine-grained recognition is to identify sub-ordinate categories in images like different species of birds. Existing works have confirmed that, in order to capture the subtle differences across the categories, automatic localization of objects and parts is critical. Most approaches for object and part localization relied on the bottom-up pipeline, where thousands of region proposals are generated and then filtered by pre-trained object/part models. This is computationally expensive and not scalable once the number of objects/parts becomes large. In this paper, we propose a nonparametric data-driven method for object and part localization. Given an unlabeled test image, our approach transfers annotations from a few similar images retrieved in the training set. In particular, we propose an iterative transfer strategy that gradually refine the predicted bounding boxes. Based on the located objects and parts, deep convolutional features are extracted for recognition. We evaluate our approach on the widely-used CUB200-2011 dataset and a new and large dataset called Birdsnap. On both datasets, we achieve better results than many state-of-the-art approaches, including a few using oracle (manually annotated) bounding boxes in the test images.
  • We perform fast vehicle detection from traffic surveillance cameras. A novel deep learning framework, namely Evolving Boxes, is developed that proposes and refines the object boxes under different feature representations. Specifically, our framework is embedded with a light-weight proposal network to generate initial anchor boxes as well as to early discard unlikely regions; a fine-turning network produces detailed features for these candidate boxes. We show intriguingly that by applying different feature fusion techniques, the initial boxes can be refined for both localization and recognition. We evaluate our network on the recent DETRAC benchmark and obtain a significant improvement over the state-of-the-art Faster RCNN by 9.5% mAP. Further, our network achieves 9-13 FPS detection speed on a moderate commercial GPU.
  • Previous learning based hand pose estimation methods does not fully exploit the prior information in hand model geometry. Instead, they usually rely a separate model fitting step to generate valid hand poses. Such a post processing is inconvenient and sub-optimal. In this work, we propose a model based deep learning approach that adopts a forward kinematics based layer to ensure the geometric validity of estimated poses. For the first time, we show that embedding such a non-linear generative process in deep learning is feasible for hand pose estimation. Our approach is verified on challenging public datasets and achieves state-of-the-art performance.
  • This paper proposes the problem of point-and-count as a test case to break the what-and-where deadlock. Different from the traditional detection problem, the goal is to discover key salient points as a way to localize and count the number of objects simultaneously. We propose two alternatives, one that counts first and then point, and another that works the other way around. Fundamentally, they pivot around whether we solve "what" or "where" first. We evaluate their performance on dataset that contains multiple instances of the same class, demonstrating the potentials and their synergies. The experiences derive a few important insights that explains why this is a much harder problem than classification, including strong data bias and the inability to deal with object scales robustly in state-of-art convolutional neural networks.
  • This paper studies deep network architectures to address the problem of video classification. A multi-stream framework is proposed to fully utilize the rich multimodal information in videos. Specifically, we first train three Convolutional Neural Networks to model spatial, short-term motion and audio clues respectively. Long Short Term Memory networks are then adopted to explore long-term temporal dynamics. With the outputs of the individual streams, we propose a simple and effective fusion method to generate the final predictions, where the optimal fusion weights are learned adaptively for each class, and the learning process is regularized by automatically estimated class relationships. Our contributions are two-fold. First, the proposed multi-stream framework is able to exploit multimodal features that are more comprehensive than those previously attempted. Second, we demonstrate that the adaptive fusion method using the class relationship as a regularizer outperforms traditional alternatives that estimate the weights in a "free" fashion. Our framework produces significantly better results than the state of the arts on two popular benchmarks, 92.2\% on UCF-101 (without using audio) and 84.9\% on Columbia Consumer Videos.
  • Videos contain very rich semantic information. Traditional hand-crafted features are known to be inadequate in analyzing complex video semantics. Inspired by the huge success of the deep learning methods in analyzing image, audio and text data, significant efforts are recently being devoted to the design of deep nets for video analytics. Among the many practical needs, classifying videos (or video clips) based on their major semantic categories (e.g., "skiing") is useful in many applications. In this paper, we conduct an in-depth study to investigate important implementation options that may affect the performance of deep nets on video classification. Our evaluations are conducted on top of a recent two-stream convolutional neural network (CNN) pipeline, which uses both static frames and motion optical flows, and has demonstrated competitive performance against the state-of-the-art methods. In order to gain insights and to arrive at a practical guideline, many important options are studied, including network architectures, model fusion, learning parameters and the final prediction methods. Based on the evaluations, very competitive results are attained on two popular video classification benchmarks. We hope that the discussions and conclusions from this work can help researchers in related fields to quickly set up a good basis for further investigations along this very promising direction.
  • Classifying videos according to content semantics is an important problem with a wide range of applications. In this paper, we propose a hybrid deep learning framework for video classification, which is able to model static spatial information, short-term motion, as well as long-term temporal clues in the videos. Specifically, the spatial and the short-term motion features are extracted separately by two Convolutional Neural Networks (CNN). These two types of CNN-based features are then combined in a regularized feature fusion network for classification, which is able to learn and utilize feature relationships for improved performance. In addition, Long Short Term Memory (LSTM) networks are applied on top of the two features to further model longer-term temporal clues. The main contribution of this work is the hybrid learning framework that can model several important aspects of the video data. We also show that (1) combining the spatial and the short-term motion features in the regularized fusion network is better than direct classification and fusion using the CNN with a softmax layer, and (2) the sequence-based LSTM is highly complementary to the traditional classification strategy without considering the temporal frame orders. Extensive experiments are conducted on two popular and challenging benchmarks, the UCF-101 Human Actions and the Columbia Consumer Videos (CCV). On both benchmarks, our framework achieves to-date the best reported performance: $91.3\%$ on the UCF-101 and $83.5\%$ on the CCV.
  • Deep Convolutional Neural Networks (CNNs) have gained great success in image classification and object detection. In these fields, the outputs of all layers of CNNs are usually considered as a high dimensional feature vector extracted from an input image and the correspondence between finer level feature vectors and concepts that the input image contains is all-important. However, fewer studies focus on this deserving issue. On considering the correspondence, we propose a novel approach which generates an edited version for each original CNN feature vector by applying the maximum entropy principle to abandon particular vectors. These selected vectors correspond to the unfriendly concepts in each image category. The classifier trained from merged feature sets can significantly improve model generalization of individual categories when training data is limited. The experimental results for classification-based object detection on canonical datasets including VOC 2007 (60.1%), 2010 (56.4%) and 2012 (56.3%) show obvious improvement in mean average precision (mAP) with simple linear support vector machines.
  • Network Coding encourages information coding across a communication network. While the necessity, benefit and complexity of network coding are sensitive to the underlying graph structure of a network, existing theory on network coding often treats the network topology as a black box, focusing on algebraic or information theoretic aspects of the problem. This work aims at an in-depth examination of the relation between algebraic coding and network topologies. We mathematically establish a series of results along the direction of: if network coding is necessary/beneficial, or if a particular finite field is required for coding, then the network must have a corresponding hidden structure embedded in its underlying topology, and such embedding is computationally efficient to verify. Specifically, we first formulate a meta-conjecture, the NC-Minor Conjecture, that articulates such a connection between graph theory and network coding, in the language of graph minors. We next prove that the NC-Minor Conjecture is almost equivalent to the Hadwiger Conjecture, which connects graph minors with graph coloring. Such equivalence implies the existence of $K_4$, $K_5$, $K_6$, and $K_{O(q/\log{q})}$ minors, for networks requiring $\mathbb{F}_3$, $\mathbb{F}_4$, $\mathbb{F}_5$ and $\mathbb{F}_q$, respectively. We finally prove that network coding can make a difference from routing only if the network contains a $K_4$ minor, and this minor containment result is tight. Practical implications of the above results are discussed.
  • Reconstruction based subspace clustering methods compute a self reconstruction matrix over the samples and use it for spectral clustering to obtain the final clustering result. Their success largely relies on the assumption that the underlying subspaces are independent, which, however, does not always hold in the applications with increasing number of subspaces. In this paper, we propose a novel reconstruction based subspace clustering model without making the subspace independence assumption. In our model, certain properties of the reconstruction matrix are explicitly characterized using the latent cluster indicators, and the affinity matrix used for spectral clustering can be directly built from the posterior of the latent cluster indicators instead of the reconstruction matrix. Experimental results on both synthetic and real-world datasets show that the proposed model can outperform the state-of-the-art methods.