• Quantum key distribution (QKD) uses individual light quanta in quantum superposition states to guarantee unconditional communication security between distant parties. In practice, the achievable distance for QKD has been limited to a few hundred kilometers, due to the channel loss of fibers or terrestrial free space that exponentially reduced the photon rate. Satellite-based QKD promises to establish a global-scale quantum network by exploiting the negligible photon loss and decoherence in the empty out space. Here, we develop and launch a low-Earth-orbit satellite to implement decoy-state QKD with over kHz key rate from the satellite to ground over a distance up to 1200 km, which is up to 20 orders of magnitudes more efficient than that expected using an optical fiber (with 0.2 dB/km loss) of the same length. The establishment of a reliable and efficient space-to-ground link for faithful quantum state transmission constitutes a key milestone for global-scale quantum networks.
  • We present spectroscopic measurements on the night sky of Xinglong Observatory for a period of 12 years from 2004 to 2015. The spectra were obtained on moonless clear nights using the OMR spectrograph mounted on a 2.16-m reflector with a wavelength coverage of 4000-7000A. The night sky spectrum shows the presence of emission lines from Hg I and Na I due to local artificial sources, along with the atmospheric emission lines, i.e., O I and OH molecules, indicating the existence of light pollution. We have monitored the night sky brightness during the whole night and found some decrement in the sky brightness with time, but the change is not significant. Also, we monitored the light pollution level in different azimuthal directions and found that the influence of light pollution from the direction of Beijing is stronger compared with that from the direction of Tangshan and other areas. An analysis of night sky spectra for the entire data set suggested that the zenith sky brightness of Xinglong Observatory has brightened by about 0.5 mag arcsec -2 in the V and B bands from 2004 to 2015. We recommend consecutive spectroscopic measurements of the night sky brightness at Xinglong Observatory in the future, not only for monitoring but also for scientific reference.
  • Xinglong Observatory of the National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences (NAOC), is one of the major optical observatories in China, which hosts nine optical telescopes including the Large Sky Area Multi-Object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST) and the 2.16 m reflector. Scientific research from these telescopes is focused on stars, galaxies, and exoplanets using multicolor photometry and spectroscopic observations. Therefore, it is important to provide the observing conditions of the site, in detail, to the astronomers for an efficient use of these facilities. In this article, we present the characterization of observing conditions at Xinglong Observatory based on the monitoring of meteorology, seeing and sky brightness during the period from 2007 to 2014. Results suggest that Xinglong Observatory is still a good site for astronomical observations. Our analysis of the observing conditions at Xinglong Observatory can be used as a reference to the observers on targets selection, observing strategy, and telescope operation.
  • Tsinghua-NAOC (National Astronomical Observatories of China) Telescope (hereafter, TNT) is an 80-cm Cassegrain reflecting telescope located at Xinglong bservatory of NAOC, with main scientific goals of monitoring various transients in the universe such as supernovae, gamma-ray bursts, novae, variable stars, and active galactic nuclei. We present in this paper a systematic test and analysis of the photometric performance of this telescope. Based on the calibration observations on twelve photometric nights, spanning the period from year 2004 to year 2012, we derived an accurate transformation relationship between the instrumental $ubvri$ magnitudes and standard Johnson $UBV$ and Cousins $RI$ magnitudes. In particular, the color terms and the extinction coefficients of different passbands are well determined. With these data, we also obtained the limiting magnitudes and the photometric precision of TNT. It is worthwhile to point out that the sky background at Xinglong Observatory may become gradually worse over the period from year 2005 to year 2012 (e.g., $\sim$21.4 mag vs. $\sim$20.1 mag in the V band).