• Bell nonlocality plays a fundamental role in quantum theory. Numerous tests of the Bell inequality have been reported since the ground-breaking discovery of the Bell theorem.Up to now, however, most discussions of the Bell scenario have focused on a single pair of entangled particles distributed to only two separated observers. Recently, it has been shown surprisingly that multiple observers can share the nonlocality present in a single particle from an entangled pair using the method of weak measurements [Phys. Rev. Lett. {\bf 114}, 250401 (2015)]. Here we report an observation of double CHSH-Bell inequality violations for a single pair of entangled photons with strength continuous-tunable optimal weak measurements in photonic system for the first time. Our results not only shed new light on the interplay between nonlocality and quantum measurements but may also be significant for important applications such as unbounded randomness certification and quantum steering.
  • Sequential weak measurements of non-commuting observables is not only fundamentally interesting in quantum measurement but also shown potential in various applications. The previous reported methods, however, can only realize limited sequential weak measurements experimentally. In this Letter, we propose the realization of sequential measurements of arbitrary observables and experimentally demonstrate for the first time the measurement of sequential weak values of three non-commuting Pauli observables by using genuine single photons. The results presented here will not only improve our understanding of quantum measurement, e.g. testing quantum contextuality, macroscopic realism, and uncertainty relation, but also have many applications such as realizing counterfactual computation, direct process tomography, direct measurement of the density matrix and unbounded randomness certification.
  • We present the first experimental confirmation of the quantum-mechanical prediction of stronger-than-binary correlations. These are correlations that cannot be explained under the assumption that the occurrence of a particular outcome of an $n \ge 3$-outcome measurement is due to a two-step process in which, in the first step, some classical mechanism precludes $n-2$ of the outcomes and, in the second step, a binary measurement generates the outcome. Our experiment uses pairs of photonic qutrits distributed between two laboratories, where randomly chosen three-outcome measurements are performed. We report a violation by {9.3} standard deviations of the optimal inequality for nonsignaling binary correlations.
  • Quantum entanglement is the key resource for quantum information processing. Device-independent certification of entangled states is a long standing open question, which arouses the concept of self-testing. The central aim of self-testing is to certify the state and measurements of quantum systems without any knowledge of their inner workings, even when the used devices cannot be trusted. Specifically, utilizing Bell's theorem, it is possible to place a boundary on the singlet fidelity of entangled qubits. Here, beyond this rough estimation, we experimentally demonstrate a complete self-testing process for various pure bipartite entangled states up to four dimensions, by simply inspecting the correlations of the measurement outcomes. We show that this self-testing process can certify the exact form of entangled states with fidelities higher than 99.9% for all the investigated scenarios, which indicates the superior completeness and robustness of this method. Our work promotes self-testing as a practical tool for developing quantum techniques.
  • Weak value amplification has been applied to various small physical quantities estimation, however there still lacks a practical feasible protocol to amplify ultra-small longitudinal phase, which is of importance in high precision measurement. Very recently, a different amplification protocol within the framework of weak measurements is proposed to solve this problem, which is capable of measuring any ultra-small longitudinal phase signal that conventional interferometry tries to do. Here we experimentally demonstrate this weak measurements amplification protocol of ultra-small longitudinal phase and realize one order of magnitude amplification in the same technical condition, which verifies the validity of the protocol and show higher precision and sensitivity than conventional interferometry. Our results significantly broaden the area of applications of weak measurements and may play an important role in high precision measurements.
  • We investigate both theoretically and experimentally the dynamics of entanglement and non-locality for two qubits immersed in a global pure dephasing environment. We demonstrate the existence of a class of states for which entanglement is forever frozen during the dynamics, even if the state of the system does evolve. At the same time non-local correlations, quantified by the violation of the Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt (CHSH) inequality, either undergo sudden death or are trapped during the dynamics.
  • We experimentally show that nonlocality can be produced from single-particle contextuality by using two-particle correlations which do not violate any Bell inequality by themselves. This demonstrates that nonlocality can come from an {\em a priori} different simpler phenomenon, and connects contextuality and nonlocality, the two critical resources for, respectively, quantum computation and secure communication. From the perspective of quantum information, our experiment constitutes a proof of principle that quantum systems can be used simultaneously for both quantum computation and secure communication.
  • As one of the most intriguing intrinsic properties of quantum world, quantum superposition provokes great interests in its own generation. Oszmaniec [Phys. Rev. Lett. 116, 110403 (2016)] have proven that though a universal quantum machine that creates superposition of arbitrary two unknown states is physically impossible, a probabilistic protocol exists in the case of two input states have nonzero overlaps with the referential state. Here we report a heralded quantum machine realizing superposition of arbitrary two unknown photonic qubits as long as they have nonzero overlaps with the horizontal polarization state $|H\rangle$. A total of 11 different qubit pairs are chosen to test this protocol by comparing the reconstructed output state with theoretical expected superposition of input states. We obtain the average fidelity as high as 0.99, which shows the excellent reliability of our realization. This realization not only deepens our understanding of quantum superposition but also has significant applications in quantum information and quantum computation, e.g., generating non-classical states in the context of quantum optics and realizing information compression by coherent superposition of results of independent runs of subroutines in a quantum computation.
  • Many quantum information tasks rely on entanglement, which is used as a resource, for example, to enable efficient and secure communication. Typically, noise, accompanied by loss of entanglement, reduces the efficiency of quantum protocols. We develop and demonstrate experimentally a superdense coding scheme with noise, where the decrease of entanglement in Alice's encoding state does not reduce the efficiency of the information transmission. Having almost fully dephased classical two-photon polarization state at the time of encoding with concurrence $0.163\pm0.007$, we reach values of mutual information close to $1.52\pm 0.02$ ($1.89\pm 0.05$) with 3-state (4-state) encoding. This high efficiency relies both on non-Markovian features, that Bob exploits just before his Bell-state measurement, and on very high visibility ($99.6\%\pm0.1\%$) of the Hong-Ou-Mandel interference within the experimental set-up. Our proof-of-principle results with measurements on mutual information pave the way for exploiting non-Markovianity to improve the efficiency and security of quantum information processing tasks.
  • Observables are believed that they must be Hermitian in quantum theory. Based on the obviously physical fact that only eigenstates of observable and its corresponding probabilities, i.e., spectrum distribution of observable are actually observed, we argue that observables need not necessarily to be Hermitian. More generally, observables should be reformulated as normal operators including Hermitian operators as a subclass. This reformulation is consistent with the quantum theory currently used and does not change any physical results. The Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt (CHSH) inequality is taken as an example to show that our opinion does not conflict with conventional quantum theory and gives the same physical results. Reformulation of observables as normal operators not only coincides with the physical facts but also will deepen our understanding of measurement in quantum theory.