• Quantum entanglement is the key resource for quantum information processing. Device-independent certification of entangled states is a long standing open question, which arouses the concept of self-testing. The central aim of self-testing is to certify the state and measurements of quantum systems without any knowledge of their inner workings, even when the used devices cannot be trusted. Specifically, utilizing Bell's theorem, it is possible to place a boundary on the singlet fidelity of entangled qubits. Here, beyond this rough estimation, we experimentally demonstrate a complete self-testing process for various pure bipartite entangled states up to four dimensions, by simply inspecting the correlations of the measurement outcomes. We show that this self-testing process can certify the exact form of entangled states with fidelities higher than 99.9% for all the investigated scenarios, which indicates the superior completeness and robustness of this method. Our work promotes self-testing as a practical tool for developing quantum techniques.
  • Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) steering describes a quantum nonlocal phenomenon in which one party can nonlocally affect the other's state through local measurements. It reveals an additional concept of quantum nonlocality, which stands between quantum entanglement and Bell nonlocality. Recently, a quantum information task named as subchannel discrimination (SD) provides a necessary and sufficient characterization of EPR steering. The success probability of SD using steerable states is higher than using any unsteerable states, even when they are entangled. However, the detailed construction of such subchannels and the experimental realization of the corresponding task are still technologically challenging. In this work, we designed a feasible collection of subchannels for a quantum channel and experimentally demonstrated the corresponding SD task where the probabilities of correct discrimination are clearly enhanced by exploiting steerable states. Our results provide a concrete example to operationally demonstrate EPR steering and shine a new light on the potential application of EPR steering.
  • Standard weak measurement (SWM) has been proved to be a useful ingredient for measuring small longitudinal phase shifts. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 033604 (2013)]. In this letter, we show that with specfic pre-coupling and postselection, destructive interference can be observed for the two conjugated variables, i.e. time and frequency, of the meter state. Using a broad band source, this conjugated destructive interference (CDI) can be observed in a regime approximately 1 attosecond, while the related spectral shift reaches hundreds of THz. This extreme sensitivity can be used to detect tiny longitudinal phase perturbation. Combined with a frequency-domain analysis, conjugated destructive interference weak measurement (CDIWM) is proved to outperform SWM by two orders of magnitude.
  • Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) steering describes the ability of one observer to nonlocally "steer" the other observer's state through local measurements. It exhibits a unique asymmetric property, i.e., the steerability of one observer to steer the other's state could be different from each other, which can even lead to a one-way EPR steering, i.e., only one observer obtains the steerability in the two-observer case. This property is inherently different from the symmetric concepts of entanglement and Bell nonlocality and has been attracted increasing interests. Here, we experimentally demonstrate the asymmetric EPR steering for a class of two-qubit states in the case of two measurement settings. We propose a practical method to quantify the steerability. We then provide a necessary and sufficient condition for EPR steering and clearly show the case of one-way EPR steering. Our work provides a new insight on the fundamental asymmetry of quantum nonlocality and would find potential application in asymmetric quantum information processing.
  • We report results of a high precision phase estimation based on a weak measurements scheme using commercial light-emitting diode. The method is based on a measurement of the imaginary part of the weak value of a polarization operator. The imaginary part of the weak value appeared due to the measurement interaction itself. The sensitivity of our method is equivalent to resolving light pulses of order of attosecond and it is robust against chromatic dispersion.
  • An upper bound between the information gain and state reversibility of weak measurement was first developed by Y. K. Cheong and S. W. Lee [Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 150402 (2012)]. Their results are valid for arbitrary d-level quantum systems. In light of the commonly used qubit system in quantum information, a sharp tradeoff relation can be obtained. In this letter, this tradeoff relation is experimentally verified with polarization encoded single photons from a quantum dot. Furthermore, a complete traversal of weak measurement operators is realized, and the mapping to the least upper bound of this tradeoff relation is obtained. Our results complement the theoretical work and provide a universal ruler for the characterization of weak measurements.
  • We experimentally realized a new method for transmitting quantum information reliably through paired optical polarization-maintaining (PM) fibers. The physical setup extends the use of a Mach-Zehnder interferometer, where noises are canceled through interference. This method can be viewed as an improved version of the current decohernce-free subspace (DFS) approach in fiber optics. Furthermore, the setup can be applied bidirectionally, which means that robust quantum communication can be achieved from both ends. To rigorously quantify the amount of quantum information transferred, optical fibers are analyzed with the tools developed in quantum communication theory. These results not only suggests a practical means for protecting classical and quantum information through optical fibers, but also provides a new physical platform for enriching the structure of the quantum communication theory.
  • The Kibble-Zurek mechanism (KZM) captures the key physics in the non-equilibrium dynamics of second-order phase transitions, and accurately predict the density of the topological defects formed in this process. However, despite much effort, the veracity of the central prediction of KZM, i.e., the scaling of the density production and the transit rate, is still an open question. Here, we performed an experiment, based on a nine-stage optical interferometer with an overall fidelity up to 0.975$\pm$0.008, that directly supports the central prediction of KZM in quantum non-equilibrium dynamics. In addition, our work has significantly upgraded the number of stages of the optical interferometer to nine with a high fidelity, this technique can also help to push forward the linear optical quantum simulation and computation.
  • The simulation of low-temperature properties of many-body systems remains one of the major challenges in theoretical and experimental quantum information science. We present, and demonstrate experimentally, a universal cooling method which is applicable to any physical system that can be simulated by a quantum computer. This method allows us to distill and eliminate hot components of quantum states, i.e., a quantum Maxwell's demon. The experimental implementation is realized with a quantum-optical network, and the results are in full agreement with theoretical predictions (with fidelity higher than 0.978). These results open a new path for simulating low-temperature properties of physical and chemical systems that are intractable with classical methods.
  • The uncertainty principle, which bounds the uncertainties involved in obtaining precise outcomes for two complementary variables defining a quantum particle, is a crucial aspect in quantum mechanics. Recently, the uncertainty principle in terms of entropy has been extended to the case involving quantum entanglement. With previously obtained quantum information for the particle of interest, the outcomes of both non-commuting observables can be predicted precisely, which greatly generalises the uncertainty relation. Here, we experimentally investigated the entanglement-assisted entropic uncertainty principle for an entirely optical setup. The uncertainty is shown to be near zero in the presence of quasi-maximal entanglement. The new uncertainty relation is further used to witness entanglement. The verified entropic uncertainty relation provides an intriguing perspective in that it implies the uncertainty principle is not only observable-dependent but is also observer-dependent.
  • An improvement of the scheme by Brunner and Simon [Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 010405 (2010)] is proposed in order to show that quantum weak measurements can provide a method to detect ultrasmall longitudinal phase shifts, even with white light. By performing an analysis in the frequency domain, we find that the amplification effect will work as long as the spectrum is large enough, irrespective of the behavior in the time domain. As such, the previous scheme can be notably simplified for experimental implementations.
  • We experimentally demonstrate the nonlocal reversal of a partial-collapse quantum measurement on two-photon entangled state. Both the partial measurement and the reversal operation are implemented in linear optics with two displaced Sagnac interferometers, which are characterized by single qubit quantum process tomography. The recovered state is measured by quantum state tomography and its nonlocality is characterized by testing the Bell inequality. Our result will be helpful in quantum communication and quantum error correction.
  • By using photon pairs created in parametric down conversion, we report on an experiment, which demonstrates that measurement can recover the quantum entanglement of two qubit system in a pure dephasing environment. The concurrence of the final state with and without measurement are compared and analyzed. Furthermore, we verify that recovered states can still violate Bell's inequality, that is, to say, such recovered states exhibit nonlocality. In the context of quantum entanglement, sudden death and rebirth provide clear evidence, which verifies that entanglement dynamics of the system is sensitive not only to its environment, but also on its initial state.
  • We experimentally investigate the dynamics of classical and quantum correlations of a Bell diagonal state in a non-Markovian dephasing environment. The sudden transition from classical to quantum decoherence regime is observed during the dynamics of such kind of Bell diagonal state. Due to the refocusing effect of the overall relative phase, the quantum correlation revives from near zero and then decays again in the subsequent evolution. However, the non-Markovian effect is too weak to revive the classical correlation, which remains constant in the same evolution range. With the implementation of an optical $\sigma_{x}$ operation, the sudden transition from quantum to classical revival regime is obtained and correlation echoes are formed. Our method can be used to control the revival time of correlations, which would be important in quantum memory.
  • It is well known that many operations in quantum information processing depend largely on a special kind of quantum correlation, that is, entanglement. However, there are also quantum tasks that display the quantum advantage without entanglement. Distinguishing classical and quantum correlations in quantum systems is therefore of both fundamental and practical importance. In consideration of the unavoidable interaction between correlated systems and the environment, understanding the dynamics of correlations would stimulate great interest. In this study, we investigate the dynamics of different kinds of bipartite correlations in an all-optical experimental setup. The sudden change in behaviour in the decay rates of correlations and their immunity against certain decoherences are shown. Moreover, quantum correlation is observed to be larger than classical correlation, which disproves the early conjecture that classical correlation is always greater than quantum correlation. Our observations may be important for quantum information processing.
  • The dynamics of entanglement between two photons with one of them passing through noisy quantum channels is characterized. It is described by a simple factorization law which was first theoretically proposed by Konrad {\it et al.} [Nature Phys., 4, 99 (2008)]. Quantum state tomography process is employed to reconstruct the reduced density matrixes of the final states and the corresponding concurrences are calculated. Good fittings between experimental results and theoretical predictions are found, which imply the validity of the general factorization law in the characterization of entanglement dynamics.