• A zero-temperature magnetic-field-driven superconductor to insulator transition (SIT) in quasi-two-dimensional superconductors is expected to occur when the applied magnetic-field crosses a certain critical value. A fundamental question is whether this transition is due to the localization of Cooper pairs or due to the destruction of them. Here we address this question by studying the SIT in amorphous WSi. Transport measurements reveal the localization of Cooper pairs at a quantum critical field B_c^1 (Bose-insulator), with a product of the correlation length and dynamical exponents zv~4/3 near the quantum critical point (QCP). Beyond B_c^1, superconducting fluctuations still persist at finite temperatures. Above a second critical field B_c^2>B_c^1, the Cooper pairs are destroyed and the film becomes a Fermi-insulator. The different phases all merge at a tricritical point at finite temperatures with zv=2/3. Our results suggest a sequential superconductor to Bose insulator to Fermi insulator phase transition, which differs from the conventional scenario involving a single quantum critical point.
  • We study magnitudes and temperature dependences of the electron-electron and electron-phonon interaction times which play the dominant role in the formation and relaxation of photon induced hotspot in two dimensional amorphous WSi films. The time constants are obtained through magnetoconductance measurements in perpendicular magnetic field in the superconducting fluctuation regime and through time-resolved photoresponse to optical pulses. The excess magnetoconductivity is interpreted in terms of the weak-localization effect and superconducting fluctuations. Aslamazov-Larkin, and Maki-Thompson superconducting fluctuation alone fail to reproduce the magnetic field dependence in the relatively high magnetic field range when the temperature is rather close to Tc because the suppression of the electronic density of states due to the formation of short lifetime Cooper pairs needs to be considered. The time scale {\tau}_i of inelastic scattering is ascribed to a combination of electron-electron ({\tau}_(e-e)) and electron-phonon ({\tau}_(e-ph)) interaction times, and a characteristic electron-fluctuation time ({\tau}_(e-fl)), which makes it possible to extract their magnitudes and temperature dependences from the measured {\tau}_i. The ratio of phonon-electron ({\tau}_(ph-e)) and electron-phonon interaction times is obtained via measurements of the optical photoresponse of WSi microbridges. Relatively large {\tau}_(e-ph)/{\tau}_(ph-e) and {\tau}_(e-ph)/{\tau}_(e-e) ratios ensure that in WSi the photon energy is more efficiently confined in the electron subsystem than in other materials commonly used in the technology of superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors (SNSPDs). We discuss the impact of interaction times on the hotspot dynamics and compare relevant metrics of SNSPDs from different materials.
  • In a recent publication we have proposed a numerical model that describes the detection process of optical photons in superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors (SNSPD). Here, we review this model and present a significant improvement that allows us to calculate more accurate current distributions for the inhomogeneous quasi-particle densities occurring after photon absorption. With this new algorithm we explore the detector response in standard NbN SNSPD for photons absorbed off-center and for 2-photon processes. We also discuss the outstanding performance of SNSPD based on WSi. Our numerical results indicate a different detection mechanism in WSi than in NbN or similar materials.