• Magnetoelectric coupling has been a trending research topic in both organic and inorganic materials and hybrids. The concept of controlling magnetism using an electric field is particularly appealing in energy efficient applications. In this spirit, ferroelectricity has been introduced to organic spin valves to manipulate the magneto transport, where the spin transport through the ferromagnet/organic spacer interfaces (spinterface) are under intensive study. The ferroelectric materials in the organic spin valves provide a knob to vary the interfacial energy alignment and the interfacial crystal structures, both are critical for the spin transport. In this review, we first go over the basic concepts of spin transport in organic spin valves. Then we introduce the recent efforts of controlling magnetoresistance of organic spin valves using ferroelectricity, where the ferroelectric material is either inserted as an interfacial layer or used as a spacer material. The realization of the ferroelectric control of magneto transport in organic spin valve, advances our understanding in the spin transport through the ferromagnet/organic interface and suggests more functionality of organic spintronic devices.
  • The magnetic interaction between rare-earth and Fe ions in hexagonal rare-earth ferrites (h-REFeO3), may amplify the weak ferromagnetic moment on Fe, making these materials more appealing as multiferroics. To elucidate the interaction strength between the rare-earth and Fe ions as well as the magnetic moment of the rare-earth ions, element specific magnetic characterization is needed. Using X-ray magnetic circular dichroism, we have studied the ferrimagnetism in h-YbFeO3 by measuring the magnetization of Fe and Yb separately. The results directly show anti-alignment of magnetization of Yb and Fe ions in h-YbFeO3 at low temperature, with an exchange field on Yb of about 17 kOe. The magnetic moment of Yb is about 1.6 \muB at low-temperature, significantly reduced compared with the 4.5 \muB moment of a free Yb3+. In addition, the saturation magnetization of Fe in h-YbFeO3 has a sizable enhancement compared with that in h-LuFeO3. These findings directly demonstrate that ferrimagnetic order exists in h-YbFeO3; they also account for the enhancement of magnetization and the reduction of coercivity in h-YbFeO3 compared with those in h-LuFeO3 at low temperature, suggesting an important role for the rare-earth ions in tuning the multiferroic properties of h-REFeO3.
  • We have carried out the growth of h-RFeO3 (001) (R=Lu, Yb) thin films on Fe3O4 (111)/Al2O3 (001) substrates, and studied the effect of the h-RFeO3 (001)/Fe3O4 (111) interfaces on the epitaxy and magnetism. The observed epitaxial relations between h-RFeO3 and Fe3O4 indicates an unusual matching of Fe sub-lattices rather than a matching of O sub-lattices. The out-of-plane direction was found to be the easy magnetic axis for h-YbFeO3 (001) but the hard axis for Fe3O4 (111) in the h-YbFeO3 (001)/Fe3O4 (111)/Al2O3 (001) films, suggesting a perpendicular magnetic alignment at the h-YbFeO3 (001)/Fe3O4 (111) interface. These results indicate that Fe3O4 (111)/Al2O3 (001) could be a promising substrate for epitaxial growth of h-RFeO3 films of well-defined interface and for exploiting their spintronic properties.
  • Elastic strain is potentially an important approach in tuning the properties of the improperly multiferroic hexagonal ferrites, the details of which have however been elusive due to the experimental difficulties. Employing the method of restrained thermal expansion, we have studied the effect of isothermal biaxial strain in the basal plane of h-LuFeO3 (001) films. The results indicate that a compressive biaxial strain significantly enhances the ferrodistortion, and the effect is larger at higher temperatures. The compressive biaxial strain and the enhanced ferrodistortion together, cause an increase in the electric polarization and a reduction in the canting of the weak ferromagnetic moments in h-LuFeO3, according to our first principle calculations. These findings are important for understanding the strain effect as well as the coupling between the lattice and the improper multiferroicity in h-LuFeO3. The experimental elucidation of the strain effect in h-LuFeO3 films also suggests that the restrained thermal expansion can be a viable method to unravel the strain effect in many other epitaxial thin film materials.
  • Ferroelectricity at room temperature has been demonstrated in nanometer-thin quasi 2D croconic acid thin films, by the polarization hysteresis loop measurements in macroscopic capacitor geometry, along with observation and manipulation of the nanoscale domain structure by piezoresponse force microscopy. The fabrication of continuous thin films of the hydrogen-bonded croconic acid was achieved by the suppression of the thermal decomposition using low evaporation temperatures in high vacuum, combined with growth conditions far from thermal equilibrium. For nominal coverages >=20 nm, quasi 2D and polycrystalline films, with an average grain size of 50-100 nm and 3.5 nm roughness, can be obtained. Spontaneous ferroelectric domain structures of the thin films have been observed and appear to correlate with the grain patterns. The application of this solvent-free growth protocol may be a key to the development of flexible organic ferroelectric thin films for electronic applications.
  • The structural transition at about 1000 {\deg}C, from the hexagonal to the orthorhombic phase of LuFeO3, has been investigated in thin films of LuFeO3. Separation of the two structural phases of LuFeO3 occurs on a length scale of micrometer, as visualized in real space using X-ray photoemission electron microscopy (X-PEEM). The results are consistent with X-ray diffraction and atomic force microscopy obtained from LuFeO3 thin films undergoing the irreversible structural transition from the hexagonal to the orthorhombic phase of LuFeO3, at elevated temperatures. The sharp phase boundaries between the structural phases are observed to align with the crystal planes of the hexagonal LuFeO3 phase. The coexistence of different structural domains indicates that the irreversible structural transition, from the hexagonal to the orthorhombic phase in LuFeO3, is a first order transition, for epitaxial hexagonal LuFeO3 films grown on Al2O3.
  • Electronic structures for the conduction bands of both hexagonal and orthorhombic LuFeO3 thin films have been measured using x-ray absorption spectroscopy at oxygen K (O K) edge. Dramatic differences in both the spectra shape and the linear dichroism are observed. These differences in the spectra can be explained using the differences in crystal field splitting of the metal (Fe and Lu) electronic states and the differences in O 2p-Fe 3d and O 2p-Lu 5d hybridizations. While the oxidation states has not changed, the spectra are sensitive to the changes in the local environments of the Fe3+ and Lu3+ sites in the hexagonal and orthorhombic structures. Using the crystal-field splitting and the hybridizations that are extracted from the measured electronic structures and the structural distortion information, we derived the occupancies of the spin minority states in Fe3+, which are non-zero and uneven. The single ion anisotropy on Fe3+ sites is found to originate from these uneven occupancies of the spin minority states via spin-orbit coupling in LuFeO3.
  • We have studied the growth of Fe3O4 (111) epitaxial films on Al2O3 (001) substrates using a pulsed laser deposition / thermal reduction cycle using an {\alpha}-Fe2O3 target. While direct deposition onto the Al2O3 (001) substrates results in an {\alpha}-Fe2O3 epilayer, deposition on the Fe3O4 (111) surface results in a {\gamma}-Fe2O3 epilayer. The kinetics of the transitions between Fe2O3 and Fe3O4 were studied by measuring the time constants of the transitions. The transition from {\alpha}-Fe2O3 to Fe3O4 via thermal reduction turns out to be very slow, due to the high activation energy. Despite the significant grain boundaries due to the mismatch between the unit cells of the film and the substrate, the Fe3O4 (111) films grown from deposition/thermal reduction show high crystallinity.
  • Using combined theoretical and experimental approaches, we studied the structural and electronic origin of the magnetic structure in hexagonal LuFeO$_3$. Besides showing the strong exchange coupling that is consistent with the high magnetic ordering temperature, the previously observed spin reorientation transition is explained by the theoretically calculated magnetic phase diagram. The structural origin of this spin reorientation that is responsible for the appearance of spontaneous magnetization, is identified by theory and verified by x-ray diffraction and absorption experiments.
  • Hexagonal ferrites (h-RFeO$_3$, R=Y, Dy-Lu) have recently been identified as a new family of multiferroic complex oxides. The coexisting spontaneous electric and magnetic polarizations make h-RFeO$_3$ rare-case ferroelectric ferromagnets at low temperature. Plus the room-temperature multiferroicity and predicted magnetoelectric effect, h-RFeO$_3$ are promising materials for multiferroic applications. Here we review the structural, ferroelectric, magnetic, and magnetoelectric properties of h-RFeO$_3$. The thin film growth is also discussed because it is critical in making high quality single crystalline materials for studying intrinsic properties.
  • Organic spintronic devices have been appealing because of the long spin life time of the charge carriers in the organic materials and their low cost, flexibility and chemical diversity. In previous studies, the control of resistance of organic spin valves is generally achieved by the alignment of the magnetization directions of the two ferromagnetic electrodes, generating magnetoresistance.1 Here we employ a new knob to tune the resistance of organic spin valves by adding a thin ferroelectric interfacial layer between the ferromagnetic electrode and the organic spacer. We show that the resistance can be controlled by not only the spin alignment of the two ferromagnetic electrodes, but also by the electric polarization of the interfacial ferroelectric layer: the MR of the spin valve depends strongly on the history of the bias voltage which is correlated with the polarization of the ferroelectric layer; the MR even changes sign when the electric polarization of the ferroelectric layer is reversed. This new tunability can be understood in terms of the change of relative energy level alignment between ferromagnetic electrode and the organic spacer caused by the electric dipole moment of the ferroelectric layer. These findings enable active control of resistance using both electric and magnetic fields, opening up possibility for multi-state organic spin valves and shed light on the mechanism of the spin transport in organic spin valves.
  • Electronically phase separated manganite wires are found to exhibit controllable metal-insulator transitions under local electric fields. The switching characteristics are shown to be fully reversible, polarity independent, and highly resistant to thermal breakdown caused by repeated cycling. It is further demonstrated that multiple discrete resistive states can be accessed in a single wire. The results conform to a phenomenological model in which the inherent nanoscale insulating and metallic domains are rearranged through electrophoretic-like processes to open and close percolation channels.
  • An experimental study was conducted on controlling the growth mode of La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 thin films on SrTiO3 substrates using pulsed laser deposition (PLD) by tuning growth temperature, pressure and laser fluence. Different thin film morphology, crystallinity and stoichiometry have been observed depending on growth parameters. To understand the microscopic origin, the adatom nucleation, step advance processes and their relationship to film growth were theoretically analyzed and a growth diagram was constructed. Three boundaries between highly and poorly crystallized growth, 2D and 3D growth, stoichiometric and non-stoichiometric growth were identified in the growth diagram. A good fit of our experimental observation with the growth diagram was found. This case study demonstrates that a more comprehensive understanding of the growth mode in PLD is possible.
  • The crystal and magnetic structures of single-crystalline hexagonal LuFeO$_3$ films have been studied using x-ray, electron and neutron diffraction methods. The polar structure of these films are found to persist up to 1050 K; and the switchability of the polar behavior is observed at room temperature, indicating ferroelectricity. An antiferromagnetic order was shown to occur below 440 K, followed by a spin reorientation resulting in a weak ferromagnetic order below 130 K. This observation of coexisting multiple ferroic orders demonstrates that hexagonal LuFeO$_3$ films are room-temperature multiferroics.
  • Hexagonal LuFeO$_3$ films have been studied using x-ray absorption and optical spectroscopy. The crystal splittings of Fe$^{3+}$ are extracted as $E_{e'}-E_{e"}$=0.7 eV and $E_{a_1'}-E_{e'}$=0.9 eV and a 2.0 eV optical band gap is determined assuming a direct gap. First-principles calculations confirm the experiments that the relative energies of crystal field splitting states do follow $E_{a_1'}>E_{e'}>E_{e"}$ with slightly underestimated values and a band gap of 1.35 eV.
  • A growth diagram of Lu-Fe-O compounds on MgO (111) substrates using pulsed laser deposition is constructed based on extensive growth experiments. The LuFe$_2$O$_4$ phase can only be grown in a small range of temperature and O$_2$ pressure conditions. An understanding of the growth mechanism of Lu-Fe-O compound films is offered in terms of the thermochemistry at the surface. Superparamagnetism is observed in LuFe$_2$O$_4$ film and is explained in terms of the effect of the impurity h-LuFeO$_3$ phase and structural defects .
  • The cobalt and iron clusters CoN, FeN (20 < N < 150) measured in a cryogenic molecular beam are found to be bistable with magnetic moments per atom both {\mu}N/N 2{\mu}B in the ground states and {\mu}N */N {\mu}B in the metastable excited states (for iron clusters, {\mu}N ~3N{\mu}B and {\mu}N* N{\mu}B). This energy gap between the two states vanish for large clusters, which explains the rapid convergence of the magnetic moments to the bulk value and suggests that ground state for the bulk involves a superposition of the two, in line with the fluctuating local orders in the bulk itinerant ferromagnetism.
  • Electric deflections of niobium clusters in molecular beams show that they have permanent electric dipole moments at cryogenic temperatures but not higher temperatures, indicating that they are ferroelectric. Detailed analysis shows that the deflections cannot be explained in terms of a rotating classical dipole, as claimed by Anderson et al. The shapes of the deflected beam profiles and their field and temperature dependences indicates that the clusters can exist in two states, one with a dipole and the other without. Cluster with dipoles occupy lower energy states. Excitations from the lower states to the higher states can be induced by low fluence laser excitation. This causes the dipole to vanish.