• Radiologists in their daily work routinely find and annotate significant abnormalities on a large number of radiology images. Such abnormalities, or lesions, have collected over years and stored in hospitals' picture archiving and communication systems. However, they are basically unsorted and lack semantic annotations like type and location. In this paper, we aim to organize and explore them by learning a deep feature representation for each lesion. A large-scale and comprehensive dataset, DeepLesion, is introduced for this task. DeepLesion contains bounding boxes and size measurements of over 32K lesions. To model their similarity relationship, we leverage multiple supervision information including types, self-supervised location coordinates and sizes. They require little manual annotation effort but describe useful attributes of the lesions. Then, a triplet network is utilized to learn lesion embeddings with a sequential sampling strategy to depict their hierarchical similarity structure. Experiments show promising qualitative and quantitative results on lesion retrieval, clustering, and classification. The learned embeddings can be further employed to build a lesion graph for various clinically useful applications. We propose algorithms for intra-patient lesion matching and missing annotation mining. Experimental results validate their effectiveness.
  • Chest X-rays are one of the most common radiological examinations in daily clinical routines. Reporting thorax diseases using chest X-rays is often an entry-level task for radiologist trainees. Yet, reading a chest X-ray image remains a challenging job for learning-oriented machine intelligence, due to (1) shortage of large-scale machine-learnable medical image datasets, and (2) lack of techniques that can mimic the high-level reasoning of human radiologists that requires years of knowledge accumulation and professional training. In this paper, we show the clinical free-text radiological reports can be utilized as a priori knowledge for tackling these two key problems. We propose a novel Text-Image Embedding network (TieNet) for extracting the distinctive image and text representations. Multi-level attention models are integrated into an end-to-end trainable CNN-RNN architecture for highlighting the meaningful text words and image regions. We first apply TieNet to classify the chest X-rays by using both image features and text embeddings extracted from associated reports. The proposed auto-annotation framework achieves high accuracy (over 0.9 on average in AUCs) in assigning disease labels for our hand-label evaluation dataset. Furthermore, we transform the TieNet into a chest X-ray reporting system. It simulates the reporting process and can output disease classification and a preliminary report together. The classification results are significantly improved (6% increase on average in AUCs) compared to the state-of-the-art baseline on an unseen and hand-labeled dataset (OpenI).
  • Negative and uncertain medical findings are frequent in radiology reports, but discriminating them from positive findings remains challenging for information extraction. Here, we propose a new algorithm, NegBio, to detect negative and uncertain findings in radiology reports. Unlike previous rule-based methods, NegBio utilizes patterns on universal dependencies to identify the scope of triggers that are indicative of negation or uncertainty. We evaluated NegBio on four datasets, including two public benchmarking corpora of radiology reports, a new radiology corpus that we annotated for this work, and a public corpus of general clinical texts. Evaluation on these datasets demonstrates that NegBio is highly accurate for detecting negative and uncertain findings and compares favorably to a widely-used state-of-the-art system NegEx (an average of 9.5% improvement in precision and 5.1% in F1-score).
  • The recent rapid and tremendous success of deep convolutional neural networks (CNN) on many challenging computer vision tasks largely derives from the accessibility of the well-annotated ImageNet and PASCAL VOC datasets. Nevertheless, unsupervised image categorization (i.e., without the ground-truth labeling) is much less investigated, yet critically important and difficult when annotations are extremely hard to obtain in the conventional way of "Google Search" and crowd sourcing. We address this problem by presenting a looped deep pseudo-task optimization (LDPO) framework for joint mining of deep CNN features and image labels. Our method is conceptually simple and rests upon the hypothesized "convergence" of better labels leading to better trained CNN models which in turn feed more discriminative image representations to facilitate more meaningful clusters/labels. Our proposed method is validated in tackling two important applications: 1) Large-scale medical image annotation has always been a prohibitively expensive and easily-biased task even for well-trained radiologists. Significantly better image categorization results are achieved via our proposed approach compared to the previous state-of-the-art method. 2) Unsupervised scene recognition on representative and publicly available datasets with our proposed technique is examined. The LDPO achieves excellent quantitative scene classification results. On the MIT indoor scene dataset, it attains a clustering accuracy of 75.3%, compared to the state-of-the-art supervised classification accuracy of 81.0% (when both are based on the VGG-VD model).
  • The chest X-ray is one of the most commonly accessible radiological examinations for screening and diagnosis of many lung diseases. A tremendous number of X-ray imaging studies accompanied by radiological reports are accumulated and stored in many modern hospitals' Picture Archiving and Communication Systems (PACS). On the other side, it is still an open question how this type of hospital-size knowledge database containing invaluable imaging informatics (i.e., loosely labeled) can be used to facilitate the data-hungry deep learning paradigms in building truly large-scale high precision computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) systems. In this paper, we present a new chest X-ray database, namely "ChestX-ray8", which comprises 108,948 frontal-view X-ray images of 32,717 unique patients with the text-mined eight disease image labels (where each image can have multi-labels), from the associated radiological reports using natural language processing. Importantly, we demonstrate that these commonly occurring thoracic diseases can be detected and even spatially-located via a unified weakly-supervised multi-label image classification and disease localization framework, which is validated using our proposed dataset. Although the initial quantitative results are promising as reported, deep convolutional neural network based "reading chest X-rays" (i.e., recognizing and locating the common disease patterns trained with only image-level labels) remains a strenuous task for fully-automated high precision CAD systems. Data download link: https://nihcc.app.box.com/v/ChestXray-NIHCC
  • Extracting, harvesting and building large-scale annotated radiological image datasets is a greatly important yet challenging problem. It is also the bottleneck to designing more effective data-hungry computing paradigms (e.g., deep learning) for medical image analysis. Yet, vast amounts of clinical annotations (usually associated with disease image findings and marked using arrows, lines, lesion diameters, segmentation, etc.) have been collected over several decades and stored in hospitals' Picture Archiving and Communication Systems. In this paper, we mine and harvest one major type of clinical annotation data - lesion diameters annotated on bookmarked images - to learn an effective multi-class lesion detector via unsupervised and supervised deep Convolutional Neural Networks (CNN). Our dataset is composed of 33,688 bookmarked radiology images from 10,825 studies of 4,477 unique patients. For every bookmarked image, a bounding box is created to cover the target lesion based on its measured diameters. We categorize the collection of lesions using an unsupervised deep mining scheme to generate clustered pseudo lesion labels. Next, we adopt a regional-CNN method to detect lesions of multiple categories, regardless of missing annotations (normally only one lesion is annotated, despite the presence of multiple co-existing findings). Our integrated mining, categorization and detection framework is validated with promising empirical results, as a scalable, universal or multi-purpose CAD paradigm built upon abundant retrospective medical data. Furthermore, we demonstrate that detection accuracy can be significantly improved by incorporating pseudo lesion labels (e.g., Liver lesion/tumor, Lung nodule/tumor, Abdomen lesions, Chest lymph node and others). This dataset will be made publicly available (under the open science initiative).
  • Obtaining semantic labels on a large scale radiology image database (215,786 key images from 61,845 unique patients) is a prerequisite yet bottleneck to train highly effective deep convolutional neural network (CNN) models for image recognition. Nevertheless, conventional methods for collecting image labels (e.g., Google search followed by crowd-sourcing) are not applicable due to the formidable difficulties of medical annotation tasks for those who are not clinically trained. This type of image labeling task remains non-trivial even for radiologists due to uncertainty and possible drastic inter-observer variation or inconsistency. In this paper, we present a looped deep pseudo-task optimization procedure for automatic category discovery of visually coherent and clinically semantic (concept) clusters. Our system can be initialized by domain-specific (CNN trained on radiology images and text report derived labels) or generic (ImageNet based) CNN models. Afterwards, a sequence of pseudo-tasks are exploited by the looped deep image feature clustering (to refine image labels) and deep CNN training/classification using new labels (to obtain more task representative deep features). Our method is conceptually simple and based on the hypothesized "convergence" of better labels leading to better trained CNN models which in turn feed more effective deep image features to facilitate more meaningful clustering/labels. We have empirically validated the convergence and demonstrated promising quantitative and qualitative results. Category labels of significantly higher quality than those in previous work are discovered. This allows for further investigation of the hierarchical semantic nature of the given large-scale radiology image database.