• We employ an effective field theory (EFT) that exploits the separation of scales in the p-wave halo nucleus $^8\mathrm{B}$ to describe the process $^7\mathrm{Be}(p,\gamma)^8\mathrm{B}$ up to a center-of-mass energy of 500 keV. The calculation, for which we develop the lagrangian and power counting, is carried out up to next-to-leading order (NLO) in the EFT expansion. The power counting we adopt implies that Coulomb interactions must be included to all orders in $\alpha_{\rm em}$. We do this via EFT Feynman diagrams computed in time-ordered perturbation theory, and so recover existing quantum-mechanical technology such as the two-potential formalism for the treatment of the Coulomb-nuclear interference. Meanwhile the strong interactions and the E1 operator are dealt with via EFT expansions in powers of momenta, with a breakdown scale set by the size of the ${}^7$Be core, $\Lambda \approx 70$ MeV. Up to NLO the relevant physics in the different channels that enter the radiative capture reaction is encoded in ten different EFT couplings. The result is a model-independent parametrization for the reaction amplitude in the energy regime of interest. To show the connection to previous results we fix the EFT couplings using results from a number of potential model and microscopic calculations in the literature. Each of these models corresponds to a particular point in the space of EFTs. The EFT structure therefore provides a very general way to quantify the model uncertainty in calculations of $^7\mathrm{Be}(p,\gamma)^8\mathrm{B}$. We also demonstrate that the only N$^2$LO corrections in $^7\mathrm{Be}(p,\gamma)^8\mathrm{B}$ come from an inelasticity that is practically of N$^3$LO size in the energy range of interest, and so the truncation error in our calculation is effectively N$^3$LO. We also discuss the relation of our extrapolated $S(0)$ to the previous standard evaluation.
  • Marco Battaglieri, Alberto Belloni, Aaron Chou, Priscilla Cushman, Bertrand Echenard, Rouven Essig, Juan Estrada, Jonathan L. Feng, Brenna Flaugher, Patrick J. Fox, Peter Graham, Carter Hall, Roni Harnik, JoAnne Hewett, Joseph Incandela, Eder Izaguirre, Daniel McKinsey, Matthew Pyle, Natalie Roe, Gray Rybka, Pierre Sikivie, Tim M. P. Tait, Natalia Toro, Richard Van De Water, Neal Weiner, Kathryn Zurek, Eric Adelberger, Andrei Afanasev, Derbin Alexander, James Alexander, Vasile Cristian Antochi, David Mark Asner, Howard Baer, Dipanwita Banerjee, Elisabetta Baracchini, Phillip Barbeau, Joshua Barrow, Noemie Bastidon, James Battat, Stephen Benson, Asher Berlin, Mark Bird, Nikita Blinov, Kimberly K. Boddy, Mariangela Bondi, Walter M. Bonivento, Mark Boulay, James Boyce, Maxime Brodeur, Leah Broussard, Ranny Budnik, Philip Bunting, Marc Caffee, Sabato Stefano Caiazza, Sheldon Campbell, Tongtong Cao, Gianpaolo Carosi, Massimo Carpinelli, Gianluca Cavoto, Andrea Celentano, Jae Hyeok Chang, Swapan Chattopadhyay, Alvaro Chavarria, Chien-Yi Chen, Kenneth Clark, John Clarke, Owen Colegrove, Jonathon Coleman, David Cooke, Robert Cooper, Michael Crisler, Paolo Crivelli, Francesco D'Eramo, Domenico D'Urso, Eric Dahl, William Dawson, Marzio De Napoli, Raffaella De Vita, Patrick DeNiverville, Stephen Derenzo, Antonia Di Crescenzo, Emanuele Di Marco, Keith R. Dienes, Milind Diwan, Dongwi Handiipondola Dongwi, Alex Drlica-Wagner, Sebastian Ellis, Anthony Chigbo Ezeribe, Glennys Farrar, Francesc Ferrer, Enectali Figueroa-Feliciano, Alessandra Filippi, Giuliana Fiorillo, Bartosz Fornal, Arne Freyberger, Claudia Frugiuele, Cristian Galbiati, Iftah Galon, Susan Gardner, Andrew Geraci, Gilles Gerbier, Mathew Graham, Edda Gschwendtner, Christopher Hearty, Jaret Heise, Reyco Henning, Richard J. Hill, David Hitlin, Yonit Hochberg, Jason Hogan, Maurik Holtrop, Ziqing Hong, Todd Hossbach, T. B. Humensky, Philip Ilten, Kent Irwin, John Jaros, Robert Johnson, Matthew Jones, Yonatan Kahn, Narbe Kalantarians, Manoj Kaplinghat, Rakshya Khatiwada, Simon Knapen, Michael Kohl, Chris Kouvaris, Jonathan Kozaczuk, Gordan Krnjaic, Valery Kubarovsky, Eric Kuflik, Alexander Kusenko, Rafael Lang, Kyle Leach, Tongyan Lin, Mariangela Lisanti, Jing Liu, Kun Liu, Ming Liu, Dinesh Loomba, Joseph Lykken, Katherine Mack, Jeremiah Mans, Humphrey Maris, Thomas Markiewicz, Luca Marsicano, C. J. Martoff, Giovanni Mazzitelli, Christopher McCabe, Samuel D. McDermott, Art McDonald, Bryan McKinnon, Dongming Mei, Tom Melia, Gerald A. Miller, Kentaro Miuchi, Sahara Mohammed Prem Nazeer, Omar Moreno, Vasiliy Morozov, Frederic Mouton, Holger Mueller, Alexander Murphy, Russell Neilson, Tim Nelson, Christopher Neu, Yuri Nosochkov, Ciaran O'Hare, Noah Oblath, John Orrell, Jonathan Ouellet, Saori Pastore, Sebouh Paul, Maxim Perelstein, Annika Peter, Nguyen Phan, Nan Phinney, Michael Pivovaroff, Andrea Pocar, Maxim Pospelov, Josef Pradler, Paolo Privitera, Stefano Profumo, Mauro Raggi, Surjeet Rajendran, Nunzio Randazzo, Tor Raubenheimer, Christian Regenfus, Andrew Renshaw, Adam Ritz, Thomas Rizzo, Leslie Rosenberg, Andre Rubbia, Ben Rybolt, Tarek Saab, Benjamin R. Safdi, Elena Santopinto, Andrew Scarff, Michael Schneider, Philip Schuster, George Seidel, Hiroyuki Sekiya, Ilsoo Seong, Gabriele Simi, Valeria Sipala, Tracy Slatyer, Oren Slone, Peter F Smith, Jordan Smolinsky, Daniel Snowden-Ifft, Matthew Solt, Andrew Sonnenschein, Peter Sorensen, Neil Spooner, Brijesh Srivastava, Ion Stancu, Louis Strigari, Jan Strube, Alexander O. Sushkov, Matthew Szydagis, Philip Tanedo, David Tanner, Rex Tayloe, William Terrano, Jesse Thaler, Brooks Thomas, Brianna Thorpe, Thomas Thorpe, Javier Tiffenberg, Nhan Tran, Marco Trovato, Christopher Tully, Tony Tyson, Tanmay Vachaspati, Sven Vahsen, Karl van Bibber, Justin Vandenbroucke, Anthony Villano, Tomer Volansky, Guojian Wang, Thomas Ward, William Wester, Andrew Whitbeck, David A. Williams, Matthew Wing, Lindley Winslow, Bogdan Wojtsekhowski, Hai-Bo Yu, Shin-Shan Yu, Tien-Tien Yu, Xilin Zhang, Yue Zhao, Yi-Ming Zhong
    July 14, 2017 hep-ph, hep-ex, astro-ph.CO
    This white paper summarizes the workshop "U.S. Cosmic Visions: New Ideas in Dark Matter" held at University of Maryland on March 23-25, 2017.
  • Recently the experimentalists in [PRL 116, 042501 (2016)] announced observing an unexpected enhancement of the electron-positron pair production signal in one of the Beryllium-8 nuclear transitions. The following studies have been focused on possible explanations based on introducing new types of particle. In this work, we improve the nuclear physics modeling of the reaction by studying the pair emission anisotropy and the interferences between different multipoles in an effective field theory inspired framework, and examine their possible relevance to the anomaly. The connection between the previously measured on-shell photon production and the pair production in the same nuclear transitions is established. These improvements, absent in the original experimental analysis, should be included in extracting new particle's properties from the experiment of this type. We then study the possibility of using the nuclear transition form factor to explain the anomaly. The reduction of the anomaly's significance by simply rescaling our predicted event count is also investigated.
  • In this study, we propose a novel method to measure bottom-up saliency maps of natural images. In order to eliminate the influence of top-down signals, backward masking is used to make stimuli (natural images) subjectively invisible to subjects, however, the bottom-up saliency can still orient the subjects attention. To measure this orientation/attention effect, we adopt the cueing effect paradigm by deploying discrimination tasks at each location of an image, and measure the discrimination performance variation across the image as the attentional effect of the bottom-up saliency. Such attentional effects are combined to construct a final bottomup saliency map. Based on the proposed method, we introduce a new bottom-up saliency map dataset of natural images to benchmark computational models. We compare several state-of-the-art saliency models on the dataset. Moreover, the proposed paradigm is applied to investigate the neural basis of the bottom-up visual saliency map by analyzing psychophysical and fMRI experimental results. Our findings suggest that the bottom-up saliency maps of natural images are constructed in V1. It provides a strong scientific evidence to resolve the long standing dispute in neuroscience about where the bottom-up saliency map is constructed in human brain.
  • Properties of hot and dense matter are calculated in the framework of quantum hadro-dynamics by including contributions from two-loop (TL) diagrams arising from the exchange of iso-scalar and iso-vector mesons between nucleons. Our extension of mean-field theory (MFT) employs the same five density-independent coupling strengths which are calibrated using the empirical properties at the equilibrium density of iso-spin symmetric matter. Results of calculations from the MFT and TL approximations are compared for conditions of density, temperature, and proton fraction encountered in astrophysics applications involving compact objects. The TL results for the equation of state (EOS) of cold pure neutron matter at sub- and near-nuclear densities agree well with those of modern quantum Monte Carlo and effective field-theoretical approaches. Although the high-density EOS in the TL approximation for neutron-star matter is substantially softer than its MFT counterpart, it is able to support a $2M_\odot$ neutron star required by recent precise determinations. In addition, radii of $1.4M_\odot$ stars are smaller by $\sim 1$ km than obtained in MFT. In contrast to MFT, the TL results also give a better account of the single-particle or optical potentials extracted from analyses of medium-energy proton-nucleus and heavy-ion experiments. In degenerate conditions, the thermal variables are well reproduced by results of Landau's Fermi-Liquid theory in which density-dependent effective masses feature prominently. The ratio of the thermal components of pressure and energy density expressed as $\Gamma_{th}=1+(P_{th}/\epsilon_{th})$, often used in astrophysical simulations, exhibits a stronger dependence on density than on proton fraction and temperature in both MFT and TL calculations. The prominent peak of $\Gamma_{th}$ at supra-nuclear density found in MFT is, however, suppressed in TL calculations.
  • We consider pion production in parity-violating electron scattering (PVES) in the presence of nucleon strangeness in the framework of partial wave analysis with unitarity. Using the experimental bounds on the strange form factors obtained in elastic PVES, we study the sensitivity of the parity-violating asymmetry to strange nucleon form factors. For forward kinematics and electron energies above 1 GeV, we observe that this sensitivity may reach about 20\% in the threshold region. With parity-violating asymmetries being as large as tens p.p.m., this study suggests that threshold pion production in PVES can be used as a promising way to better constrain strangeness contributions. Using this model for the neutral current pion production, we update the estimate for the dispersive $\gamma Z$-box correction to the weak charge of the proton. In the kinematics of the Qweak experiment, our new prediction reads Re$\,\Box_{\gamma Z}^V(E=1.165\,{\rm GeV}) = (5.58\pm1.41)\times10^{-3}$, an improvement over the previous uncertainty estimate of $\pm2.0\times10^{-3}$. Our new prediction in the kinematics of the upcoming MESA/P2 experiment reads Re$\,\Box_{\gamma Z}^V(E=0.155\,{\rm GeV}) = (1.1\pm0.2) \times 10^{-3}$.
  • We have studied the 7Be(p,photon)8B reaction in the Halo effective field theory (EFT) framework. The leading order (LO) results were published in Phys.Rev.C89,051602(2014) after the isospin mirror process, 7Li(n,photon)8Li, was addressed in Phys.Rev.C89,024613(2014). In both calculations, one key step was using the final shallow bound state asymptotic normalization coefficients (ANCs) computed by ab initio methods to fix the EFT couplings. Recently we have developed the next-to-LO (NLO) formalism (to appear soon), which could reproduce other model results by no worse than 1% when the 7Be-p energy was between 0 and 0.5 MeV. In our recent report (arXiv:1507.07239), a different approach from that in Phys.Rev.C89,051602(2014) was used. We applied Bayesian analysis to constrain all the NLO-EFT parameters based on measured S-factors, and found tight constraints on the S-factor at solar energies. Our S(E=0 MeV)= 21.3 + - 0.7 eV b. The uncertainty is half of that previously recommended. In this proceeding, we provide extra details of the Bayesian analysis, including the computed EFT parameters' probability distribution functions (PDFs) and how the choice of input data impacts final results.
  • We report an improved low-energy extrapolation of the cross section for the process Beryllium-7+proton -> Boron-8+photon, which determines the Boron-8 neutrino flux from the Sun. Our extrapolant is derived from Halo Effective Field Theory (EFT) at next-to-leading order. We apply Bayesian methods to determine the EFT parameters and the low-energy S-factor, using measured cross sections and scattering lengths as inputs. Asymptotic normalization coefficients of Boron-8 are tightly constrained by existing radiative capture data, and contributions to the cross section beyond external direct capture are detected in the data at E < 0.5 MeV. Most importantly, the S-factor at zero energy is constrained to be S(0)= 21.3 + - 0.7 eV b, which is an uncertainty smaller by a factor of two than previously recommended. That recommendation was based on the full range for S(0) obtained among a discrete set of models judged to be reasonable. In contrast, Halo EFT subsumes all models into a controlled low-energy approximant, where they are characterized by nine parameters at next-to-leading order. These are fit to data, and marginalized over via Monte Carlo integration to produce the improved prediction for S(E).
  • We study the charge-dependent azimuthal correlations in relativistic heavy ion collisions, as motivated by the search for the Chiral Magnetic Effect (CME) and the investigation of related background contributions. In particular we aim to understand how these correlations induced by various proposed effects evolve from collisions with AuAu system to that with UU system. To do that, we quantify the generation of magnetic field in UU collisions at RHIC energy and its azimuthal correlation to the matter geometry using event-by-event simulations. Taking the experimental data for charge-dependent azimuthal correlations from AuAu collisions and extrapolating to UU with reasonable assumptions, we examine the resulting correlations to be expected in UU collisions and compare them with recent STAR measurements. Based on such analysis we discuss the viability for explaining the data with a combination of the CME-like and flow-induced contributions.
  • We generalize forward real Compton amplitude to the case of the interference of the electromagnetic and weak neutral current, formulate a low-energy theorem, relate the new amplitudes to the interference structure functions and obtain a new set of sum rules. We address a possible new sum rule that relates the product of the axial charge and magnetic moment of the nucleon to the 0th moment of the structure function $g_5(\nu,0)$. We apply the GDH and the finite energy sum rule for constraining the dispersive $\gamma Z$-box correction to the proton's weak charge.
  • [Background:] A significant quenching of high energy jets was observed in the heavy ion collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) facility, and is now confirmed at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) facility. The RHIC plus LHC era provides a unique opportunity to study the jet-medium interaction that leads to the jet quenching, and the medium itself at different collision energies (medium temperatures). [Purpose:] We study the azimuthal anisotropy of jet quenching, to seek constraints on different models featuring distinct path-length and density dependences for jet energy loss, and to gain a better understanding of the medium. [Methods:] The models are fixed by using the RHIC data, and then applied to study the LHC case. A set of harmonic (Fourier) coefficients $v_{n}$ are extracted from the jet azimuthal anisotropy on a event-by-event basis. [Results:] The second harmonics $v_{2}$, mostly driven by the medium's geometry, can be used to differentiate jet quenching models. Other harmonics are also compared with the LHC (2.76 TeV) data. The predictions for future LHC (5.5 TeV) run are presented. [Conclusions:] We find that a too strong path-length dependence (e.g., cubic) is ruled out by the LHC $v_{2}$ data, while the model with a strong near-$T_c$ enhancement for the jet-medium interaction describes the data very well. It is worth pointing out that the latter model expects a less color-opaque medium at LHC.
  • We report a leading-order (LO) calculation of $^7\mathrm{Be}(p,\gamma)^8\mathrm{B}$ in a low-energy effective field theory. $^8\mathrm{B}$ is treated as a shallow proton$+^7\mathrm{Be}$ core and proton$+^7\mathrm{Be}^{*}$ (core excitation) $p$-wave bound state. The couplings are fixed using measured binding energies and proton-$^7\mathrm{Be}$ $s$-wave scattering lengths, together with $^8\mathrm{B}$ asymptotic normalization coefficients from ab initio calculations. We obtain a zero-energy $S$-factor of $18.2 \pm 1.2~({\rm ANC~only})$ eV b. Given that this is a LO result it is consistent with the recommended value $S(0)=20.8\pm1.6$ eV b. Our computed $S(E)$ compares favorably with experimental data on $^7\mathrm{Be}(p,\gamma)^8\mathrm{B}$ for $E <0.4$ MeV. We emphasize the important role of proton-$^7\mathrm{Be}$ scattering parameters in determining the energy dependence of $S(E)$, and demonstrate that their present uncertainties significantly limit attempts to extrapolate these data to stellar energies.
  • We report our calculation of jet quenching and its azimuthal anisotropy in the high energy AA and high multiplicity pA and dA collisions. The purpose of this study is twofold. First, we improve our previous event-by-event studies, by properly implementing $p_t$ dependence in the modeling. We show that, within the jet "monography" scenario featuring a strong near-Tc-enhancement of jet energy loss, the computed high-$p_t$ nuclear modification factor $R_{AA}$ and the harmonic coefficients in its azimuthal anisotropy $v_{2,\,3,\,4}$, agree well with the available data from both Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Second, in light of current discussions on possible final state collective behavior in the high-multiplicity pPb and dAu collisions, we examine the implication of final state jet attenuation in such collisions, by applying the same model used in AA collisions and quantifying the corresponding $R_{pA}$ and $R_{dA}$ and their azimuthal anisotropy. The high-$p_t$ $V_n$ provide a set of clean indicators of final state energy loss. In particular we find in the most central pPb (5.02 TeV) and dAu (200 GeV) collisions, $V_2$ is on the order of $0.01$ and $0.1$ respectively, measurable with current experimental accuracy. In addition, our high-$p_t$ $R_{dA}$ is around $0.6$ which is compatible with preliminary dAu results from RHIC.
  • We report a leading-order calculation of radiative ${}^{7}\mathrm{Li}$ neutron captures to both the ground and first excited state of ${}^{8}\mathrm{Li}$ in the framework of a low-energy effective field theory (Halo-EFT). Each of the possible final states is treated as a shallow bound state composed of both $n+{}^{7}\mathrm{Li}$ and $n+{}^{7}\mathrm{Li}^{*}$ (core excitation) configurations. The {\it ab initio} variational Monte Carlo method is used to compute the asymptotic normalization coefficients of these bound states, which are then used to fix couplings in our EFT. We calculate the total and partial cross sections in the radiative capture process using this calibrated EFT. Fair agreement with measured total cross sections is achieved and excellent agreement with the measured branching ratio between the two final states is found. In contrast,a previous Halo-EFT calculation [G. Rupak and R. Higa, Phys. Rev. Lett {\bf 106}, 222501 (2011)] assumes that the $n$-${}^{7}\mathrm{Li}$ couplings in different spin channels are equal, fits the $P$-wave "effective-range" parameter to the threshold cross section for ${}^7{\rm Li} + n \rightarrow {}^8{\rm Li} + \gamma$, and assumes the core excitation is at high enough energy scale that it can be integrated out.
  • We carry out a series of studies on pion and photon productions in neutrino/electron/photon--nucleus scatterings. The low energy region is investigated by using a chiral effective field theory for nuclei. The results for the neutral current induced photon production ($\gamma$-NCP) are then extrapolated to neutrino energy $E_{\nu}\sim$ GeV region. By convoluting the cross sections with MiniBooNE's beam spectrum and detection efficiency, we estimate its $\gamma$-NCP, event number, and conclude that such photon production can not fully explain its low energy event excess in both neutrino and antineutrino runs.
  • In this paper we present with full details a systematic quantification, on an even-by-event basis, of the hard probe response to the geometry and fluctuations of the hot QCD matter created in heavy ion collisions at both the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The azimuthal anisotropy of jet quenching is extracted and decomposed as harmonic responses (for n=1,2,3,4,5,6) to the corresponding harmonics in the fluctuating initial condition. We show that such jet response harmonics are sensitive to the jet quenching models as well as to the bulk matter initial compositions. By studying these for all centralities at both RHIC and LHC energies we put a strong constraint on the path-length and medium-density dependence of jet energy loss. We also examine the hard-soft di-hadron correlation arising from the hard and soft sectors' responses to the common initial fluctuations. We demonstrate that the experimentally observed "hard-ridge" can be explained this way and that its dependence on the trigger-azimuthal-angle could also be qualitatively understood.
  • This report summarizes our study of Neutral Current (NC)-induced photon production in MiniBooNE, as motivated by the low energy excess in this experiment [A. A. Aquilar-Arevalo et al. (MiniBooNE Collaboration), Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 231801 (2007); 103, 111801 (2009)]. It was proposed that NC photon production with two anomalous photon-$Z$ boson-vector meson couplings might explain the excess. However, our computed event numbers in both neutrino and antineutrino runs are consistent with the previous MiniBooNE estimate that is based on their pion production measurement. Various nuclear effects discussed in our previous works, including nucleon Fermi motion, Pauli blocking, and the $\Delta$ resonance broadening in the nucleus, are taken into account. Uncertainty due to the two anomalous terms and nuclear effects are studied in a conservative way.
  • The heavy-ion collisions can produce extremely strong transient magnetic and electric fields. We study the azimuthal fluctuation of these fields and their correlations with the also fluctuating matter geometry (characterized by the participant plane harmonics) using event-by-event simulations. A sizable suppression of the angular correlations between the magnetic field and the 2nd and 4th harmonic participant planes is found in very central and very peripheral collisions, while the magnitudes of these correlations peak around impact parameter b~8-10 fm for RHIC collisions. This can lead to notable impacts on a number of observables related to various magnetic field induced effects, and our finding suggests that the optimal event class for measuring them should be that corresponding to b~8-10 fm.
  • In this paper we study coherent neutrinoproduction of photons [neutral current (NC)] and pions [charged current (CC) and NC] with $E_{\nu} \leqslant 0.5 $ GeV. The production from nucleons and incoherent production with $E_{\nu} \leqslant 0.5 \mathrm{GeV}$ have been studied in [B. D. Serot and X. Zhang, Phys. Rev. C 86, (2012) 015501; and X. Zhang and B. D. Serot, Phys. Rev. C 86, (2012) 035502]. These processes are relevant to the background analysis in neutrino-oscillation experiments, for example MiniBooNE [A. A. Aquilar-Arevalo et al. (MiniBooNE Collaboration), Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 032301 (2008)]. We work in the framework of a Lorentz-covariant effective field theory (EFT), which contains nucleons, pions, the Delta (1232) ($\Delta$s), isoscalar scalar ($\sigma$) and vector ($\omega$) fields, and isovector vector ($\rho$) fields. The Lagrangian exhibits a nonlinear realization of (approximate) $SU(2)_{L} \otimes SU(2)_{R}$ chiral symmetry and incorporates vector meson dominance. In the calculation, a revised version of the so-called "optimal approximation" is applied, in which one-nucleon interaction amplitude is factorized out and its medium-modifications are included. The distortion of final pion wave function is calculated using the Eikonal approximation. In addition, we briefly mention the ambiguity of off-shell interaction amplitude. To benchmark the approximation scheme, we study coherent pion photoproduction. Our scheme is then applied to study the neutrinoproductions. In the pion photoproduction and NC photon production, we are able to address the contributions of two contact terms that are partially related to the proposed anomalous interactions involving $\omega (\rho)$ $Z$ boson and photon. The calculation is focused on ${}^{12}C$ target, and can be applied to other medium-heavy nucleus.
  • We study the incoherent neutrinoproduction of photons and pions with neutrino energy E_{\nu} $\leqslant$ 0.5 GeV. These processes are relevant to the background analysis in neutrino-oscillation experiments, for example MiniBooNE [A. A. Aquilar-Arevalo \textit{et al.} (MiniBooNE Collaboration), Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 032301(2008)]. The calculations are carried out using a Lorentz-covariant effective field theory (EFT) which contains nucleons, pions, the Delta (1232) ($\Delta$ s), isoscalar scalar ($\sigma$) and vector ($\omega$) fields, and isovector vector ($\rho$) fields, and has SU(2)_{L} $\otimes$ SU(2)_{R} chiral symmetry realized nonlinearly. The contributions of one-body currents are studied in the local fermi gas approximation. The current form factors are generated by meson dominance in the EFT Lagrangian. The conservation of the vector current and the partial conservation of the axial current are satisfied automatically, which is crucial for photon production. The $\Delta$ dynamics in nuclei, as a key component in the study, are explored. Introduced $\Delta$-meson couplings explain the $\Delta$ spin-orbit (S-L) coupling in nuclei, and this leads to interesting constraints on the theory. Meanwhile a phenomenological approach is applied to parametrize the $\Delta$ width. To benchmark our approximations, we calculate the differential cross sections for quasi-elastic scattering and incoherent electroproduction of pions without a final state interaction (FSI). The FSI can be ignored for photon production.
  • Neutrino-induced productions (neutrinoproduction) of photons and pions from nucleons and nuclei are important for the interpretation of neutrino-oscillation experiments, as they are potential backgrounds in the MiniBooNE experiment [A. A. Aquilar-Arevalo et al. (MiniBooNE Collaboration), Phys. Rev. Lett. {\bf 100}, 032301 (2008)]. These processes are studied at intermediate energies, where the \Delta (1232) resonance becomes important. The Lorentz-covariant effective field theory, which is the framework used in this series of study, contains nucleons, pions, \Delta s, isoscalar scalar (\sigma) and vector (\omega) fields, and isovector vector (\rho) fields. The lagrangian exhibits a nonlinear realization of (approximate) $SU(2)_L \otimes SU(2)_R$ chiral symmetry and incorporates vector meson dominance. In this paper, we focus on setting up the framework. Power counting for vertices and Feynman diagrams is explained. Because of the built-in symmetries, the vector current is automatically conserved (CVC), and the axial-vector current is partially conserved (PCAC). To calibrate the axial-vector transition current (N $\leftrightarrow$ \Delta), pion production from the nucleon is used as a benchmark and compared to bubble-chamber data from Argonne and Brookhaven National Laboratories. At low energies, the convergence of our power-counting scheme is investigated, and next-to-leading-order tree-level corrections are found to be small.
  • In this paper we study the jet response (particularly azimuthal anisotropy) as a hard probe of the harmonic fluctuations in the initial condition of central heavy ion collisions. By implementing the fluctuations via cumulant expansion for various harmonics quantified by $\epsilon_n$ and using the geometric model for jet energy loss, we compute the response $\chi^h_n=v_n/\epsilon_n$. Combining these results with the known hydrodynamic response of the bulk matter expansion in the literature, we show that the hard-soft azimuthal correlation arising from their respective responses to the common geometric fluctuations reveals a robust and narrow near-side peak that may provide the dominant contribution to the "hard-ridge" observed in experimental data.
  • We have studied electroweak (EW) interactions in quantum hadrodynamics (QHD) effective field theory (EFT). The Lorentz-covariant EFT contains nucleon, pion, $\Delta$, isoscalar scalar ($\sigma$) and vector ($\omega$) fields, and isovector vector ($\rho$) fields. The lagrangian exhibits a nonlinear realization of (approximate) $SU(2)_L \otimes SU(2)_R$ chiral symmetry and incorporates vector meson dominance. First, we discuss the EW interactions at the quark level. Then we include EW interactions in QHD EFT by using the background-field technique. The completed QHD EFT has a nonlinear realization of $SU(2)_L \otimes SU(2)_R \otimes U(1)_B$ (chiral symmetry and baryon number conservation), as well as realizations of other symmetries including Lorentz-invariance, $C$, $P$, and $T$. Meanwhile, as we know, chiral symmetry is manifestly broken due to the nonzero quark masses; the $P$ and $C$ symmetries are also broken because of weak interactions. These breaking patterns are parameterized in a general way in the EFT. Moreover, we have included the $\Delta$ resonance as manifest degrees of freedom in our QHD EFT, with a discussion of the irrelevance of the well-known pathologies involving high-spin fields from the modern EFT perspective. This enables us to discuss physics at the kinematics where the resonance becomes important. As a result, the effective theory uses hadronic degrees of freedom, satisfies the constraints due to QCD (symmetries and their breaking pattern), and is calibrated to strong-interaction phenomena. Applications to (anti)neutrino scattering are briefly discussed.
  • Neutrino-induced pion and photon production from nucleons and nuclei are important for the interpretation of neutrino-oscillation experiments, and these processes are potential backgrounds in the MiniBooNE experiment [A. A. Aquilar-Arevalo \textit{et al.} (MiniBooNE Collaboration), Phys.\ Rev.\ Lett.\ {\bf 100}, 032301 (2008)]. Pion and photon production are investigated at intermediate energies, where the $\Delta$ resonance becomes important. The Lorentz-covariant effective field theory contains nucleons, pions, Deltas, isoscalar scalar ($\sigma$) and vector ($\omega$) fields, and isovector vector ($\rho$) fields. The lagrangian exhibits a nonlinear realization of (approximate) $SU(2)_L \otimes SU(2)_R$ chiral symmetry and incorporates vector meson dominance. Power counting for vertices and Feynman diagrams involving the $\Delta$ is explained. Because of the built-in symmetries, the vector currents are automatically conserved, and the axial-vector currents satisfy PCAC. The irrelevance of so-called off-shell $\Delta$ couplings and the structure of the dressed $\Delta$ propagator, which has a pole only in the spin-3/2 channel, are discussed. To calibrate the axial-vector transition current $(N\! \leftrightarrow \Delta)$, pion production from the nucleon is used as a benchmark and compared to bubble-chamber data from Argonne and Brookhaven National Laboratories. At low energies, the convergence of our power-counting scheme is investigated, and next-to-leading-order tree-level corrections are found to be very small.