• In this Letter, we investigate the long-duration quasi-static evolution of 12 pre-eruptive filaments (4 active region and 8 quiescent filaments), mainly focusing on the evolution of the filament height in three dimension (3D) and the decay index of the background magnetic field. The filament height in 3D is derived through two-perspective observations of \textit{Solar Dynamics Observatory} and \textit{Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory}. The coronal magnetic field is reconstructed using the potential field source surface model. A new finding is that the filaments we studied show two types of long-duration evolution: one type is comprised of a long-duration static phase and a short slow rise phase with a duration of less than 12 hours and a speed of 0.1--0.7 km s$^{-1}$, while the other one only presents a slow rise phase but with an extremely long duration of more than 60 hours and a smaller speed of 0.01--0.2 km s$^{-1}$. At the moment approaching the eruption, the decay index of the background magnetic field at the filament height is similar for both active region and quiescent filaments. The average value and upper limit are $\sim$0.9 and $\sim$1.4, close to the critical index of torus instability. Moreover, the filament height and background magnetic field strength are also found to be linearly and exponentially related with the filament length, respectively.
  • We investigate the three-dimensional (3D) magnetic structure of a blowout jet originated in the west edge of NOAA Active Region (AR) 11513 on 02 July 2012 by means of recently developed forced field extrapolation (FFE) model. The results show that the blowout jet was caused by the eruption of the magnetic flux rope (MFR) consisting of twisted field lines. We further calculate the twist number $\mathcal{T}_{w}$ and squashing factor Q of the reconstructed magnetic field and find that (1) the MFR corresponds well to the high $\mathcal{T}_{w}$ region (2) the MFR outer boundary corresponds well to the high Q region, probably interpreting the bright structure at the base of the jet. The twist number of the MFR is estimated to be $\mathcal{T}_{w}=-1.54\pm 0.67$. Thus, the kink instability is regarded as the initiation mechanism of the blowout jet as $\mathcal{T}_{w}$ reaching or even exceeding the threshold value of the kink instability. Our results also indicate that the bright point at the decaying phase is actually comprised of some small loops that are heated by the reconnection occurred above. In summary, the blowout jet is mostly consistent with the scenario proposed by \citet{mcs10} except that the kink instability is found to be a possible trigger.
  • The topology and dynamics of the three-dimensional magnetic field in the solar atmosphere govern various solar eruptive phenomena and activities, such as flares, coronal mass ejections, and filaments/prominences. We have to observe and model the vector magnetic field to understand the structures and physical mechanisms of these solar activities. Vector magnetic fields on the photosphere are routinely observed via the polarized light, and inferred with the inversion of Stokes profiles. To analyze these vector magnetic fields, we need first to remove the 180$^\circ$ ambiguity of the transverse components and correct the projection effect. Then, the vector magnetic field can be served as the boundary conditions for a force-free field modeling after a proper preprocessing. The photospheric velocity field can also be derived from a time sequence of vector magnetic fields. Three-dimensional magnetic field could be derived and studied with theoretical force-free field models, numerical nonlinear force-free field models, magnetohydrostatic models, and magnetohydrodynamic models. Magnetic energy can be computed with three-dimensional magnetic field models or a time series of vector magnetic field. The magnetic topology is analyzed by pinpointing the positions of magnetic null points, bald patches, and quasi-separatrix layers. As a well conserved physical quantity, magnetic helicity can be computed with various methods, such as the finite volume method, discrete flux tube method, and helicity flux integration method. This quantity serves as a promising parameter characterizing the activity level of solar active regions.
  • Solar filaments/prominences are one of the most common features in the corona, which may lead to energetic coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and flares when they erupt. Filaments are about one hundred times cooler and denser than the coronal material, and physical understanding of their material origin remains controversial. Two types of scenarios have been proposed: one argues that the filament plasma is brought into the corona from photosphere or chromosphere through a siphon or evaporation/injection process, while the other suggests that the material condenses from the surrounding coronal plasma due to thermal instability. The elemental abundance analysis is a reasonable clue to constrain the models, as the siphon or evaporation/injection model would predict that the filament material abundances are close to the photospheric or chromospheric ones, while the condensation model should have coronal abundances. In this letter, we analyze the elemental abundances of a magnetic cloud that contains the ejected filament material. The corresponding filament eruption occurred on 1998 April 29, accompanying an M6.8 class soft X-ray flare located at the heliographic coordinates S18E20 (NOAA 08210) and a fast halo CME with the linear velocity of 1374 km s$^{-1}$ near the Sun. We find that the abundance ratios of elements with low and high First Ionization Potential such as Fe/O, Mg/O, and Si/O are 0.150, 0.050, and 0.070, respectively, approaching their corresponding photospheric values 0.065, 0.081, and 0.066, which does not support the coronal origin of the filament plasma.
  • In this paper, we study the formation and early evolution of a limb coronal mass ejection (CME) and its associated shock wave that occurred on 2014 January 8. The extreme ultraviolet (EUV) images provided by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board \textit{Solar Dynamics Observatory} disclose that the CME first appears as a bubble-like structure. Subsequently, its expansion forms the CME and causes a quasi-circular EUV wave. Interestingly, both the CME and the wave front are clearly visible at all of the AIA EUV passbands. Through a detailed kinematical analysis, it is found that the expansion of the CME undergoes two phases: a first phase with a strong but transient lateral over-expansion followed by a second phase with a self-similar expansion. The temporal evolution of the expansion velocity coincides very well with the variation of the 25--50 keV hard X-ray flux of the associated flare, which indicates that magnetic reconnection most likely plays an important role in driving the expansion. Moreover, we find that, when the velocity of the CME reaches $\sim$600 km s$^{-1}$, the EUV wave starts to evolve into a shock wave, which is evidenced by the appearance of a type II radio burst. The shock's formation height is estimated to be $\sim$0.2$R_{sun}$, which is much lower than the height derived previously. Finally, we also study the thermal properties of the CME and the EUV wave. We find that the plasma in the CME leading front and the wave front has a temperature of $\sim$2 MK, while that in the CME core region and the flare region has a much higher temperature of $\ge$8 MK.
  • Magnetic clouds (MCs) are the interplanetary counterpart of coronal magnetic flux ropes. They can provide valuable information to reveal the flux rope characteristics at their eruption stage in the corona, which are unable to be explored in situ at present. In this paper, we make a comprehensive survey of the average iron charge state (<Q>Fe) distributions inside 96 MCs for solar cycle 23 using ACE (Advanced Composition Explorer) data. As the <Q>Fe in the solar wind are typically around 9+ to 11+, the Fe charge state is defined as high when the <Q>Fe is larger than 12+, which implies the existence of a considerable amount of Fe ions with high charge states (e.g., \geq 16+). The statistical results show that the <Q>Fe distributions of 92 (~ 96%) MCs can be classified into four groups with different characteristics. In group A (11 MCs), the <Q>Fe shows a bimodal distribution with both peaks higher than 12+. Group B (4 MCs) presents a unimodal distribution of <Q>Fe with its peak higher than 12+. In groups C (29 MCs) and D (48 MCs), the <Q>Fe remains higher and lower than 12+ throughout ACE passage through the MC, respectively. Possible explanations to these distributions are discussed.
  • Magnetic reconnection is a rapid energy release process that is believed to be responsible for flares on the Sun and stars. Nevertheless, such flare-related reconnection is mostly detected to occur in the corona, while there have been few studies concerning the reconnection in the chromosphere or photosphere. Here we present both spectroscopic and imaging observations of magnetic reconnection in the chromosphere leading to a microflare. During the flare peak time, chromospheric line profiles show significant blueshifted/redshifted components on the two sides of the flaring site, corresponding to upflows and downflows with velocities of $\pm$(70--80) km s$^{-1}$, comparable with the local Alfv\'{e}n speed as expected by the reconnection in the chromosphere. The three-dimensional nonlinear force-free field configuration further discloses twisted field lines (a flux rope) at a low altitude, cospatial with the dark threads in He I 10830 \r{A} images. The instability of the flux rope may initiate the flare-related reconnection. These observations provide clear evidence of magnetic reconnection in the chromosphere and show the similar mechanisms of a microflare to those of major flares.
  • Hot channels (HCs), high temperature erupting structures in the lower corona of the Sun, have been proposed as a proxy of magnetic flux ropes (MFRs) since their initial discovery. However, it is difficult to make definitive proof given the fact that there is no direct measurement of magnetic field in the corona. An alternative way is to use the magnetic field measurement in the solar wind from in-situ instruments. On 2012 July 12, an HC was observed prior to and during a coronal mass ejection (CME) by the AIA high-temperature images. The HC is invisible in the EUVI low-temperature images, which only show the cooler leading front (LF). However, both the LF and an ejecta can be observed in the coronagraphic images. These are consistent with the high temperature and high density of the HC and support that the ejecta is the erupted HC. In the meanwhile, the associated CME shock was identified ahead of the ejecta and the sheath through the COR2 images, and the corresponding ICME was detected by \textit{ACE}, showing the shock, sheath and magnetic cloud (MC) sequentially, which agrees with the coronagraphic observations. Further, the MC contained a low-ionization-state center and a high-ionization-state shell, consistent with the pre-existing HC observation and its growth through magnetic reconnection. All of these observations support that the MC detected near the Earth is the counterpart of the erupted HC in the corona for this event. Therefore, our study provides strong observational evidence of the HC as an MFR.
  • Accurately predicting the arrival of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) at the Earth based on remote images is of critical significance in the study of space weather. In this paper, we make a statistical study of 21 Earth directed CMEs, exploring in particular the relationship between CME initial speeds and transit times. The initial speed of a CME is obtained by fitting the CME with the Graduated Cylindrical Shell model and is thus free of projection effects. We then use the drag force model to fit results of the transit time versus the initial speed. By adopting different drag regimes, i.e., the viscous, aerodynamics, and hybrid regimes, we get similar results, with the least mean estimation error of the hybrid model of 12.9 hours. CMEs with a propagation angle (the angle between the propagation direction and the Sun-Earth line) larger than its half angular width arrive at the Earth with an angular deviation caused by factors other than the radial solar wind drag. The drag force model cannot be well applied to such events. If we exclude these events in the sample, the prediction accuracy can be improved, i.e., the estimation error reduces to 6.8 hours. This work suggests that it is viable to predict the arrival time of CMEs at the Earth based on the initial parameters with a fairly good accuracy. Thus, it provides a method of space weather forecast of 1--5 days following the occurrence of CMEs.
  • Filament eruptions often lead to coronal mass ejections (CMEs), which can affect critical technological systems in space and on the ground when they interact with the geo-magnetosphere in high speeds. Therefore, it is an important issue to investigate the acceleration mechanisms of CMEs in solar/space physics. Based on observations and simulations, the resistive magnetic reconnection and the ideal instability of magnetic flux rope have been proposed to accelerate CMEs. However, it remains elusive whether both of them play a comparable role during a particular eruption. It has been extremely difficult to separate their contributions as they often work in a close time sequence during one fast acceleration phase. Here we report an intriguing filament eruption event, which shows two apparently separated fast acceleration phases and provides us an excellent opportunity to address the issue. Through analyzing the correlations between velocity (acceleration) and soft (hard) X-ray profiles, we suggest that the instability and magnetic reconnection make a major contribution during the first and second fast acceleration phases, respectively. Further, we find that both processes have a comparable contribution to accelerate the filament in this event.
  • Solar flares typically have an impulsive phase that followed by a gradual phase as best seen in soft X-ray emissions. A recent discovery based on the EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) observations onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) reveals that some flares exhibit a second large peak separated from the first main phase peak by tens of minutes to hours, which is coined as the flare's EUV late phase. In this paper, we address the origin of the EUV late phase by analyzing in detail two late phase flares, an M2.9 flare on 2010 October 16 and an M1.4 flare on 2011 February 18, using multi-passband imaging observations from the Atmospheric Imaing Assembly (AIA) onboard SDO. We find that: (1) the late phase emission originates from a different magnetic loop system, which is much larger and higher than the main phase loop system. (2) The two loop systems have different thermal evolution. While the late phase loop arcade reaches its peak brightness progressively at a later time spanning for more than one hour from high to low temperatures, the main phase loop arcade reaches its peak brightness at almost the same time (within several minutes) in all temperatures. (3) Nevertheless, the two loop systems seem to be connected magnetically, forming an asymmetric magnetic quadruple configuration. (4) Further, the footpoint brightenings in UV wavelengths show a systematic delay of about one minute from the main flare region to the remote footpoint of the late phase arcade system. We argue that the EUV late phase is the result of a long-lasting cooling process in the larger magnetic arcade system.
  • The second peak in the Fe XVI 33.5 nm line irradiance observed during solar flares by Extreme ultraviolet Variability Experiment (EVE) is known as Extreme UltraViolet (EUV) late phase. Our previous paper (Liu et al. 2013) found that the main emissions in the late phase are originated from large-scale loop arcades that are closely connected to but different from the post flare loops (PFLs), and we also proposed that a long cooling process without additional heating could explain the late phase. In this paper, we define the extremely large late phase because it not only has a bigger peak in the warm 33.5 irradiance profile, but also releases more EUV radiative energy than the main phase. Through detailedly inspecting the EUV images from three point-of-view, it is found that, besides the later phase loop arcades, the more contribution of the extremely large late phase is from a hot structure that fails to erupt. This hot structure is identified as a flux rope, which is quickly energized by the flare reconnection and later on continuously produces the thermal energy during the gradual phase. Together with the late-phase loop arcades, the fail to erupt flux rope with the additional heating create the extremely large EUV late phase.
  • Hot channel (HC) is a high temperature ($\sim$10 MK) structure in the inner corona revealed first by Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board \textit{Solar Dynamics Observatory}. Eruption of HC is often associated with flare and coronal mass ejection. Previous studies suggest that HC is a good proxy of magnetic flux rope (MFR) in the inner corona, in addition to another well-known MFR candidate, the prominence-cavity structure that is with a normal coronal temperature ($\sim$1-2 MK). In this paper, we report a high temperature structure (HTS, $\sim$1.5 MK) contained in an interplanetary coronal mass ejection induced by an HC eruption. According to the observations of bidirectional electrons, high temperature and density, strong magnetic field, and its association with the shock, sheath, and plasma pile-up region, we suggest that the HTS is the interplanetary counterpart of the HC. The scale of the measured HTS is around 14 R$_\odot$, and it maintained a much higher temperature than the background solar wind even at 1 AU. It is significantly different from the typical magnetic clouds (MCs), which usually have a much lower temperature. Our study suggests that the existence of a corotating interaction region ahead of the HC formed a magnetic container to inhibit the HC expansion and cooling down to a low temperature.
  • Using the multi-wavelength data from Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board the Solar Dynamic Observatory, we investigated two successive solar flares, a C5.1 confined flare and an X4.9 ejective flare with a halo coronal mass ejection,in NOAA AR 11990 from 2014 Feb 24 to 25. Before the confined are onset, EUV brightening beneath the filament was detected. As the are began, a twisted helical flux rope (FR) wrapping around the filament moved upward and then stopped, and in the meantime an obvious X-ray source below it was observed. Prior to the ejective X4.9 flare, some pre-existing loop structures in the active region interacted with each other, which produced a brightening region beneath the filament. Meanwhile, a small flaring loop appeared below the interaction region and some new helical lines connecting the far ends of the loop structures was gradually formed and continually added into the former twisted FR. Then, due to the resulting imbalance between the magnetic pressure and tension, the new FR together with the filament erupted outward. Our observations coincide well with tether-cutting model, suggesting that the two flares probably have the same triggering mechanism, i.e., tether-cutting reconnection. To our knowledge, this is the first direct observation of tether-cutting reconnection occurring between the pre-existing loops in active region. In the ejective flare case, the erupting filament exhibited an omega-like kinked structure and underwent an exponential rise after a slow-rise phase, indicating the kink instability might be also responsible for the eruption initiation.
  • Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are the most spectacular eruptive phenomena in the solar atmosphere. It is generally accepted that CMEs are results of eruptions of magnetic flux ropes (MFRs). However, a heated debate is on whether MFRs pre-exist before the eruptions or they are formed during the eruptions. Several coronal signatures, \textit{e.g.}, filaments, coronal cavities, sigmoid structures and hot channels (or hot blobs), are proposed as MFRs and observed before the eruption, which support the pre-existing MFR scenario. There is almost no reported observation about MFR formation during the eruption. In this letter, we present an intriguing observation of a solar eruptive event occurred on 2013 November 21 with the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board the \textit{Solar Dynamic Observatory}, which shows a detailed formation process of the MFR during the eruption. The process started with the expansion of a low-lying coronal arcade, possibly caused by the flare magnetic reconnection underneath. The newly-formed ascending loops from below further pushed the arcade upward, stretching the surrounding magnetic field. The arcade and stretched magnetic field lines then curved-in just below the arcade vertex, forming an X-point. The field lines near the X-point continued to approach each other and a second magnetic reconnection was induced. It is this high-lying magnetic reconnection that led to the formation and eruption of a hot blob ($\sim$ 10 MK), presumably a MFR, producing a CME. We suggest that two spatially-separated magnetic reconnections occurred in this event, responsible for producing the flare and the hot blob (CME), respectively.
  • In this presentation, we report for the first time the detailed temperature evolution process of the magnetic flux rope in a failed solar eruption. Occurred on January 05, 2013, the flux rope was impulsively accelerated to a speed of ~ 400 km/s in the first minute, then decelerated and came to a complete stop in two minutes. The failed eruption resulted in a large-size high-lying (~ 100 Mm above the surface) high-temperature "fire ball" sitting in the corona for more than two hours. The time evolution of the thermal structure of the flux rope was revealed through the differential emission measure analysis technique, which produced temperature maps using observations of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board Solar Dynamic Observatory. The average temperature of the flux rope steadily increased from ~ 5 MK to ~ 10 MK during the first nine minutes of the evolution, which was much longer than the rise time (about three minutes) of the associated soft X-ray flare. We suggest that the flux rope be heated by the energy release of the continuing magnetic reconnection, different from the heating of the low-lying flare loops, which is mainly produced by the chromospheric plasma evaporation. The loop arcade overlying the flux rope was pushed up by ~ 10 Mm during the attempted eruption. The pattern of the velocity variation of the loop arcade strongly suggests that the failure of the eruption be caused by the strapping effect of the overlying loop arcade.
  • For the first time, the kinematic evolution of a coronal wave over the entire solar surface is studied. Full Sun maps can be made by combining images from the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory satellites, Ahead and Behind, and the Solar Dynamics Observatory, thanks to the wide angular separation between them. We study the propagation of a coronal wave, also known as "EIT" wave, and its interaction with a coronal hole resulting in secondary waves and/or reflection and transmission. We explore the possibility of the wave obeying the law of reflection of waves. In a detailed example we find that a loop arcade at the coronal hole boundary cascades and oscillates as a result of the EUV wave passage and triggers a wave directed eastwards that appears to have reflected. We find that the speed of this wave decelerates to an asymptotic value, which is less than half of the primary EUV wave speed. Thanks to the full Sun coverage we are able to determine that part of the primary wave is transmitted through the coronal hole. This is the first observation of its kind. The kinematic measurements of the reflected and transmitted wave tracks are consistent with a fast-mode MHD wave interpretation. Eventually, all wave tracks decelerate and disappear at a distance. A possible scenario of the whole process is that the wave is initially driven by the expanding coronal mass ejection and subsequently decouples from the driver and then propagates at the local fast-mode speed.