• Multimodal machine translation is one of the applications that integrates computer vision and language processing. It is a unique task given that in the field of machine translation, many state-of-the-arts algorithms still only employ textual information. In this work, we explore the effectiveness of reinforcement learning in multimodal machine translation. We present a novel algorithm based on the Advantage Actor-Critic (A2C) algorithm that specifically cater to the multimodal machine translation task of the EMNLP 2018 Third Conference on Machine Translation (WMT18). We experiment our proposed algorithm on the Multi30K multilingual English-German image description dataset and the Flickr30K image entity dataset. Our model takes two channels of inputs, image and text, uses translation evaluation metrics as training rewards, and achieves better results than supervised learning MLE baseline models. Furthermore, we discuss the prospects and limitations of using reinforcement learning for machine translation. Our experiment results suggest a promising reinforcement learning solution to the general task of multimodal sequence to sequence learning.
  • Hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) has received great interest in recent years as a wide bandgap analog of graphene-derived systems. However, the thermal transport properties of h-BN, which can be critical for device reliability and functionality, are little studied both experimentally and theoretically. The primary challenge in the experimental measurements of the anisotropic thermal conductivity of h-BN is that typically sample size of h-BN single crystals is too small for conventional measurement techniques, as state-of-the-art technologies synthesize h-BN single crystals with lateral sizes only up to 2.5 mm and thickness up to 200 {\mu}m. Recently developed time-domain thermoreflectance (TDTR) techniques are suitable to measure the anisotropic thermal conductivity of such small samples, as it only requires a small area of 50x50 {\mu}m2 for the measurements. Accurate atomistic modeling of thermal transport in bulk h-BN is also challenging due to the highly anisotropic layered structure. Here we conduct an integrated experimental and theoretical study on the anisotropic thermal conductivity of bulk h-BN single crystals over the temperature range of 100 K to 500 K, using TDTR measurements with multiple modulation frequencies and a full-scale numerical calculation of the phonon Boltzmann transport equation starting from the first principles. Our experimental and numerical results compare favorably for both the in-plane and through-plane thermal conductivities. We observe unusual temperature-dependence and phonon-isotope scattering in the through-plane thermal conductivity of h-BN and elucidate their origins. This work not only provides an important benchmark of the anisotropic thermal conductivity of h-BN but also develops fundamental insights into the nature of phonon transport in this highly anisotropic layered material.
  • To better understand the energy response of the Antineutrino Detector (AD), the Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment installed a full Flash ADC readout system on one AD that allowed for simultaneous data taking with the current readout system. This paper presents the design, data acquisition, and simulation of the Flash ADC system, and focuses on the PMT waveform reconstruction algorithms. For liquid scintillator calorimetry, the most critical requirement to waveform reconstruction is linearity. Several common reconstruction methods were tested but the linearity performance was not satisfactory. A new method based on the deconvolution technique was developed with 1% residual non-linearity, which fulfills the requirement. The performance was validated with both data and Monte Carlo (MC) simulations, and 1% consistency between them has been achieved.
  • Materials lacking in-plane symmetry are ubiquitous in a wide range of applications such as electronics, thermoelectrics, and high-temperature superconductors, in all of which the thermal properties of the materials play a critical part. However, very few experimental techniques can be used to measure in-plane anisotropic thermal conductivity. A beam-offset method based on time-domain thermoreflectance (TDTR) was previously proposed to measure in-plane anisotropic thermal conductivity. However, a detailed analysis of the beam-offset method is still lacking. Our analysis shows that uncertainties can be large if the laser spot size or the modulation frequency is not properly chosen. Here we propose an alternative approach based on TDTR to measure in-plane anisotropic thermal conductivity using a highly elliptical pump (heating) beam. The highly elliptical pump beam induces a quasi-one-dimensional temperature profile on the sample surface that has a fast decay along the short axis of the pump beam. The detected TDTR signal is exclusively sensitive to the in-plane thermal conductivity along the short axis of the elliptical beam. By conducting TDTR measurements as a function of delay time with the rotation of the elliptical pump beam to different orientations, the in-plane thermal conductivity tensor of the sample can be determined. In this work, we first conduct detailed signal sensitivity analyses for both techniques and provide guidelines in determining the optimal experimental conditions. We then compare the two techniques under their optimal experimental conditions by measuring the in-plane thermal conductivity tensor of a ZnO [11-20] sample. The accuracy and limitations of both methods are discussed.
  • High-performance event reconstruction is critical for current and future massive liquid argon time projection chambers (LArTPCs) to realize their full scientific potential. LArTPCs with readout using wire planes provide a limited number of 2D projections. In general, without a pixel-type readout it is challenging to achieve unambiguous 3D event reconstruction. As a remedy, we present a novel 3D imaging method, Wire-Cell, which incorporates the charge and sparsity information in addition to the time and geometry through simple and robust mathematics. The resulting 3D image of ionization density provides an excellent starting point for further reconstruction and enables the true power of 3D tracking calorimetry in LArTPCs.
  • Transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) alloys have attracted great interests in recent years due to their tunable electronic properties, especially the semiconductor-metal phase transition, along with their potential applications in solid-state memories and thermoelectrics. However, the thermal conductivity of layered two-dimensional (2D) TMD alloys remains largely unexplored despite that it plays a critical role in the reliability and functionality of TMD-enabled devices. In this work, we study the temperature-dependent anisotropic thermal conductivity of the phase-transition 2D TMD alloys WSe2(1-x)Te2x in both the in-plane direction (parallel to the basal planes) and the cross-plane direction (along the c-axis) using time-domain thermoreflectance measurements. In the WSe2(1-x)Te2x alloys, the cross-plane thermal conductivity is observed to be dependent on the heating frequency (modulation frequency of the pump laser) due to the non-equilibrium transport between different phonon modes. Using a two-channel heat conduction model, we extracted the anisotropic thermal conductivity at the equilibrium limit. A clear discontinuity in both the cross-plane and the in-plane thermal conductivity is observed as x increases from 0.4 to 0.6 due to the phase transition from the 2H to Td phase in the layered 2D alloys. The temperature dependence of thermal conductivity for the TMD alloys was found to become weaker compared with the pristine 2H WSe2 and Td WTe2 due to the atomic disorder. This work serves as an important starting point for exploring phonon transport in layered 2D alloys.
  • Neutrinos from nuclear reactors have played a major role in advancing our knowledge on the properties of neutrinos. The first direct detection of neutrino, confirming its existence, was performed with reactor neutrinos. More recent experiments utilizing reactor neutrinos also found clear evidence for neutrino oscillations, providing unique inputs for neutrino masses and neutrino mixings. Ongoing and future reactor neutrino experiments will explore other important issues, including neutrino mass hierarchy and the search for sterile neutrinos and new physics beyond the Standard Model. In this article, we review the recent progress in physics with reactor neutrinos and the opportunities for future discoveries.
  • It is challenging to characterize thermal conductivity of materials with strong anisotropy. In this work, we extend the time-domain thermoreflectance (TDTR) method with a variable spot size approach to simultaneously measure the in-plane (Kr) and the through-plane (Kz) thermal conductivity of materials with strong anisotropy. We first determine Kz from the measurement using a larger spot size, when the heat flow is mainly one-dimensional along the through-plane direction, and the measured signals are sensitive to only Kz. We then extract the in-plane thermal conductivity Kr from a second measurement using the same modulation frequency but with a smaller spot size, when the heat flow becomes three-dimensional, and the signal is sensitive to both Kr and Kz. By choosing the same modulation frequency for the two sets of measurements, we can avoid potential artifacts introduced by the frequency-dependent Kz, which we have found to be non-negligible, especially for some two-dimensional layered materials like MoS2. After careful evaluation of the sensitivity of a series of hypothetical samples, we provided a guideline on choosing the most appropriate laser spot size and modulation frequency that yield the smallest uncertainty, and established a criterion for the range of thermal conductivities that can be measured reliably using our proposed variable spot size TDTR approach. We have demonstrated this variable spot size TDTR approach on samples with a wide range of in-plane thermal conductivity, including fused silica, rutile titania (TiO2 [001]), zinc oxide (ZnO [0001]), molybdenum disulfide (MoS2), hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN), and highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG).
  • Thermal conductivity and interfacial thermal conductance play crucial roles in the design of engineering systems where temperature and thermal stress are of concerns. To date, a variety of measurement techniques are available for both bulk and thin film solid-state materials with a broad temperature range. For thermal characterization of bulk material, the steady-state absolute method, laser flash diffusivity method, and transient plane source method are most used. For thin film measurement, the 3{\omega} method and transient thermoreflectance technique including both frequency-domain and time-domain analysis are employed widely. This work reviews several most commonly used measurement techniques. In general, it is a very challenging task to determine thermal conductivity and interface contact resistance with less than 5% error. Selecting a specific measurement technique to characterize thermal properties need to be based on: 1) knowledge on the sample whose thermophysical properties is to be determined, including the sample geometry and size, and preparation method; 2) understanding of fundamentals and procedures of the testing technique and equipment, for example, some techniques are limited to samples with specific geometrics and some are limited to specific range of thermophysical properties; 3) understanding of the potential error sources which might affect the final results, for example, the convection and radiation heat losses.
  • We describe the design of a 20-liter test stand constructed to study fundamental properties of liquid argon (LAr). This system utilizes a simple, cost-effective gas argon (GAr) purification to achieve high purity, which is necessary to study electron transport properties in LAr. An electron drift stack with up to 25 cm length is constructed to study electron drift, diffusion, and attachment at various electric fields. A gold photocathode and a pulsed laser are used as a bright electron source. The operational performance of this system is reported.
  • Aquaporin-1 (AQP1) is a membrane protein which is selectively permeable to water. Due to its dumbbell shape, AQP1 can sense the size information of solute molecules in osmosis. At the cost of consuming this information, AQP1 can move water against its chemical potential gradient: it is able to work as one kind of Maxwell's Demon. This effect was detected quantitatively by measuring the water osmosis of mice red blood cells. This ability may protect the red blood cells from the eryptosis elicited by osmotic shock when they move in the kidney, where a large gradient of urea is required for the urine concentrating mechanism. This finding anticipates a new beginning of inquiries into the complicated relationships among mass, energy and information in bio-systems.
  • Recent success in synthesizing two-dimensional borophene on silver substrate attracts strong interest in exploring its possible extraordinary physical properties. By using the density functional theory calculations, we show that borophene is highly stretchable along the transverse direction. The strain-to-failure in the transverse direction is nearly twice as that along the longitudinal direction. The straining induced flattening and subsequent stretch of the flat borophene are accounted for the large strain-to-failure for tension in the transverse direction. The mechanical properties in the other two directions exhibit strong anisotropy. Phonon dispersions of the strained borophene monolayers suggest that negative frequencies are presented, which indicates the instability of free-standing borophene even under high tensile stress.
  • We report the measurement of longitudinal electron diffusion coefficients in liquid argon for electric fields between 100 and 2000 V/cm with a gold photocathode as a bright electron source. The measurement principle, apparatus, and data analysis are described. Our results, which are consistent with previous measurements in the region between 100 to 350 V/cm [1] , are systematically higher than the prediction of Atrazhev-Timoshkin[2], and represent the world's best measurement in the region between 350 to 2000 V/cm. The quantum efficiency of the gold photocathode, the drift velocity and longitudinal diffusion coefficients in gas argon are also presented.
  • Great success has been achieved in improving the photovoltaic energy conversion efficiency of the organic-inorganic perovskite-based solar cells, but with very limited knowledge on the thermal transport in hybrid perovskites, which would affect the device lifetime and stability. Based on the potential developed from the density functional theory calculations, we studied the lattice thermal conductivity of the hybrid halide perovskite CH3NH3PbI3 using equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. Temperature-dependent thermal conductivity is reported from 160 K to 400 K, which covers the tetragonal phase (160-330 K) and the pseudocubic phase (>330K). A very low thermal conductivity (0.50 W/mK) is found in the tetragonal phase at room temperature, whereas a much higher thermal conductivity is found in the pseudocubic phase (1.80 W/mK at 330 K). The low group velocity of acoustic phonons and the strong anharmonicity are found responsible for the relatively low thermal conductivity of the tetragonal CH3NH3PbI3.
  • The MicroBooNE experiment is designed to observe interactions of neutrinos with a Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber (LArTPC) detector from the on-axis Booster Neutrino Beam (BNB) and off-axis Neutrinos at the Main Injector (NuMI) beam at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. The detector consists of a $2.5~m\times 2.3~m\times 10.4~m$ TPC including an array of 32 PMTs used for triggering and timing purposes. The TPC is housed in an evacuable and foam insulated cryostat vessel. It has a 2.5 m drift length in a uniform field up to 500 V/cm. There are 3 readout wire planes (U, V and Y co-ordinates) with a 3-mm wire pitch for a total of 8,256 signal channels. The fiducial mass of the detector is 60 metric tons of LAr. In a LArTPC, ionization electrons from a charged particle track drift along the electric field lines to the detection wire planes inducing bipolar signals on the U and V (induction) planes, and a unipolar signal collected on the (collection) Y plane. The raw wire signals are processed by specialized low-noise front-end readout electronics immersed in LAr which shape and amplify the signal. Further signal processing and digitization is carried out by warm electronics. We present the techniques by which the observed final digitized waveforms, which comprise the original ionization signal convoluted with detector field response and electronics response as well as noise, are processed to recover the original ionization signal in charge and time. The correct modeling of these ingredients is critical for further event reconstruction in LArTPCs.
  • Fengpeng An, Guangpeng An, Qi An, Vito Antonelli, Eric Baussan, John Beacom, Leonid Bezrukov, Simon Blyth, Riccardo Brugnera, Margherita Buizza Avanzini, Jose Busto, Anatael Cabrera, Hao Cai, Xiao Cai, Antonio Cammi, Guofu Cao, Jun Cao, Yun Chang, Shaomin Chen, Shenjian Chen, Yixue Chen, Davide Chiesa, Massimiliano Clemenza, Barbara Clerbaux, Janet Conrad, Davide D'Angelo, Herve De Kerret, Zhi Deng, Ziyan Deng, Yayun Ding, Zelimir Djurcic, Damien Dornic, Marcos Dracos, Olivier Drapier, Stefano Dusini, Stephen Dye, Timo Enqvist, Donghua Fan, Jian Fang, Laurent Favart, Richard Ford, Marianne Goger-Neff, Haonan Gan, Alberto Garfagnini, Marco Giammarchi, Maxim Gonchar, Guanghua Gong, Hui Gong, Michel Gonin, Marco Grassi, Christian Grewing, Mengyun Guan, Vic Guarino, Gang Guo, Wanlei Guo, Xin-Heng Guo, Caren Hagner, Ran Han, Miao He, Yuekun Heng, Yee Hsiung, Jun Hu, Shouyang Hu, Tao Hu, Hanxiong Huang, Xingtao Huang, Lei Huo, Ara Ioannisian, Manfred Jeitler, Xiangdong Ji, Xiaoshan Jiang, Cecile Jollet, Li Kang, Michael Karagounis, Narine Kazarian, Zinovy Krumshteyn, Andre Kruth, Pasi Kuusiniemi, Tobias Lachenmaier, Rupert Leitner, Chao Li, Jiaxing Li, Weidong Li, Weiguo Li, Xiaomei Li, Xiaonan Li, Yi Li, Yufeng Li, Zhi-Bing Li, Hao Liang, Guey-Lin Lin, Tao Lin, Yen-Hsun Lin, Jiajie Ling, Ivano Lippi, Dawei Liu, Hongbang Liu, Hu Liu, Jianglai Liu, Jianli Liu, Jinchang Liu, Qian Liu, Shubin Liu, Shulin Liu, Paolo Lombardi, Yongbing Long, Haoqi Lu, Jiashu Lu, Jingbin Lu, Junguang Lu, Bayarto Lubsandorzhiev, Livia Ludhova, Shu Luo, Vladimir Lyashuk, Randolph Mollenberg, Xubo Ma, Fabio Mantovani, Yajun Mao, Stefano M. Mari, William F. McDonough, Guang Meng, Anselmo Meregaglia, Emanuela Meroni, Mauro Mezzetto, Lino Miramonti, Thomas Mueller, Dmitry Naumov, Lothar Oberauer, Juan Pedro Ochoa-Ricoux, Alexander Olshevskiy, Fausto Ortica, Alessandro Paoloni, Haiping Peng, Jen-Chieh Peng, Ezio Previtali, Ming Qi, Sen Qian, Xin Qian, Yongzhong Qian, Zhonghua Qin, Georg Raffelt, Gioacchino Ranucci, Barbara Ricci, Markus Robens, Aldo Romani, Xiangdong Ruan, Xichao Ruan, Giuseppe Salamanna, Mike Shaevitz, Valery Sinev, Chiara Sirignano, Monica Sisti, Oleg Smirnov, Michael Soiron, Achim Stahl, Luca Stanco, Jochen Steinmann, Xilei Sun, Yongjie Sun, Dmitriy Taichenachev, Jian Tang, Igor Tkachev, Wladyslaw Trzaska, Stefan van Waasen, Cristina Volpe, Vit Vorobel, Lucia Votano, Chung-Hsiang Wang, Guoli Wang, Hao Wang, Meng Wang, Ruiguang Wang, Siguang Wang, Wei Wang, Yi Wang, Yi Wang, Yifang Wang, Zhe Wang, Zheng Wang, Zhigang Wang, Zhimin Wang, Wei Wei, Liangjian Wen, Christopher Wiebusch, Bjorn Wonsak, Qun Wu, Claudia-Elisabeth Wulz, Michael Wurm, Yufei Xi, Dongmei Xia, Yuguang Xie, Zhi-zhong Xing, Jilei Xu, Baojun Yan, Changgen Yang, Chaowen Yang, Guang Yang, Lei Yang, Yifan Yang, Yu Yao, Ugur Yegin, Frederic Yermia, Zhengyun You, Boxiang Yu, Chunxu Yu, Zeyuan Yu, Sandra Zavatarelli, Liang Zhan, Chao Zhang, Hong-Hao Zhang, Jiawen Zhang, Jingbo Zhang, Qingmin Zhang, Yu-Mei Zhang, Zhenyu Zhang, Zhenghua Zhao, Yangheng Zheng, Weili Zhong, Guorong Zhou, Jing Zhou, Li Zhou, Rong Zhou, Shun Zhou, Wenxiong Zhou, Xiang Zhou, Yeling Zhou, Yufeng Zhou, Jiaheng Zou
    Oct. 18, 2015 hep-ex, physics.ins-det
    The Jiangmen Underground Neutrino Observatory (JUNO), a 20 kton multi-purpose underground liquid scintillator detector, was proposed with the determination of the neutrino mass hierarchy as a primary physics goal. It is also capable of observing neutrinos from terrestrial and extra-terrestrial sources, including supernova burst neutrinos, diffuse supernova neutrino background, geoneutrinos, atmospheric neutrinos, solar neutrinos, as well as exotic searches such as nucleon decays, dark matter, sterile neutrinos, etc. We present the physics motivations and the anticipated performance of the JUNO detector for various proposed measurements. By detecting reactor antineutrinos from two power plants at 53-km distance, JUNO will determine the neutrino mass hierarchy at a 3-4 sigma significance with six years of running. The measurement of antineutrino spectrum will also lead to the precise determination of three out of the six oscillation parameters to an accuracy of better than 1\%. Neutrino burst from a typical core-collapse supernova at 10 kpc would lead to ~5000 inverse-beta-decay events and ~2000 all-flavor neutrino-proton elastic scattering events in JUNO. Detection of DSNB would provide valuable information on the cosmic star-formation rate and the average core-collapsed neutrino energy spectrum. Geo-neutrinos can be detected in JUNO with a rate of ~400 events per year, significantly improving the statistics of existing geoneutrino samples. The JUNO detector is sensitive to several exotic searches, e.g. proton decay via the $p\to K^++\bar\nu$ decay channel. The JUNO detector will provide a unique facility to address many outstanding crucial questions in particle and astrophysics. It holds the great potential for further advancing our quest to understanding the fundamental properties of neutrinos, one of the building blocks of our Universe.
  • Thermal transport across interfaces is an important issue for microelectronics, photonics, and thermoelectric devices and has been studied both experimentally and theoretically in the past. In this paper, thermal interface resistance (1/G) between aluminum and silicon with nanoscale vacancies was calculated using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD). Both phonon-phonon coupling and electron-phonon coupling are considered in calculations. The results showed that thermal interface resistance increased largely due to vacancies. The effect of both the size and the type of vacancies is studied and compared. And an obvious difference is found for structures with different type/size vacancies.
  • The Daya Bay experiment was designed to be the largest and the deepest underground among the many current-generation reactor antineutrino experiments. With functionally identical detectors deployed at multiple baselines, the experiment aims to achieve the most precise measurement of $\sin^2 2\theta_{13}$. The antineutrino rates measured in the two near experimental halls are used to predict the rate at the far experimental hall (average distance of 1648 m from the reactors), assuming there is no neutrino oscillation. The ratio of the measured over the predicted far-hall antineutrino rate is then used to constrain the $\sin^2 2\theta_{13}$. The relative systematic uncertainty on this ratio is expected to be 0.2$\sim$0.4%. In this talk, we present an improved measurement of the electron antineutrino disappearance at Daya Bay. With data of 139 days, the deficit of the antineutrino rate in the far experimental hall was measured to be 0.056 $\pm$ 0.007 (stat.) $\pm$ 0.003 (sys.). In the standard three-neutrino framework, the $\sin^2 2 \theta_{13}$ was determined to be 0.089 $\pm$ 0.011 at the 68% confidence level in a rate-only analysis.
  • Parton distribution functions, which represent the flavor and spin structure of the nucleon, provide invaluable information in illuminating quantum chromodynamics in the confinement region. Among various processes that measure such parton distribution functions, semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering is regarded as one of the golden channels to access transverse momentum dependent parton distribution functions, which provide a 3-D view of the nucleon structure in momentum space. The Jefferson Lab experiment E06-010 focuses on measuring the target single and double spin asymmetries in the 3He(e, e'pi+,-)X reaction with a transversely polarized 3He target in Hall A with a 5.89 GeV electron beam. A leading pion and the scattered electron are detected in coincidence by the left High-Resolution Spectrometer at 16\circ and the BigBite spectrometer at 30\circ beam right, respectively. The kinematic coverage concentrates in the valence quark region, x \sim0.1-0.4, at Q2 \sim 1-3 GeV2. The Collins and Sivers asymmetries of 3He and neutron are extracted. In this review, an overview of the experiment and the final results are presented. Furthermore, an upcoming 12-GeV program with a large acceptance solenoidal device and the future possibilities at an electron-ion collider are discussed.
  • The electromagnetic form factor of the kaon meson is calculated in the light-cone formalism of the relativistic constituent quark model. The calculated $K^+$ form factor is consistent with almost all of the available experimental data at low energy scale, while other properties of kaon could also be interrelated in this representation with reasonable parameters. Predictions of the form factors for the charged and neutral kaons at higher energy scale are also given, and we find non-zero $K^0$ form factor at $Q^2 \ne 0$ due to the mass difference between the strange and down quarks inside $K^0$.