• We study the cosmological collider phenomenology of neutrinos in an effective field theory. The mass spectrum of neutrinos and their characteristic oscillatory signatures in the squeezed limit bispectrum are computed. Both dS-covariant and slow-roll corrections are considered, so is the scenario of electroweak symmetry breaking during inflation. Interestingly, we show that the slow-roll background of the inflaton provides a chemical potential for the neutrino production. The chemical potential greatly amplifies the oscillatory signal and makes the signal observably large for heavy neutrinos without the need of fine tuning.
  • In this paper, we show how the structure of the landscape potential of the primordial universe may be probed through the properties of the primordial density perturbations responsible for the origin of the cosmic microwave background anisotropies and the large-scale structure of our universe. Isocurvature fields -fields orthogonal to the inflationary trajectory- may have fluctuated across the barriers separating local minima of the landscape potential during inflation. We analyze how this process could have impacted the evolution of the primordial curvature perturbations. If the typical distance separating consecutive minima of the landscape potential and the height of the potential barriers are smaller than the Hubble expansion rate parametrizing inflation, the probability distribution function of isocurvature fields becomes non-Gaussian due to the appearance of bumps and dips associated to the structure of the potential. We show that this non-Gaussianity can be transferred to the statistics of primordial curvature perturbations if the isocurvature fields are coupled to the curvature perturbations. The type of non-Gaussian structure that emerges in the distribution of curvature perturbations cannot be fully probed with the standard methods of poly-spectra; instead, the probability distribution function is needed. The latter is obtained by summing all the $n$-point correlation functions. To substantiate our claims, we offer a concrete model consisting of an axion-like isocurvature perturbation with a sinusoidal potential and a linear derivative coupling between the isocurvature and curvature field. In this model, the probability distribution function of the curvature perturbations consists of a Gaussian function with small superimposed oscillations reflecting the isocurvature axion potential.
  • We calculate the primordial trispectrum of curvature perturbation in quasi-single field inflation, with general sound speeds for both the inflaton and the massive scalar. Special attention is paid to various soft limits of the trispectrum, where the shape function shows characteristic oscillatory pattern (known as the quantum primordial standard clock signal) as a function of the momentum ratio. Our calculation is greatly simplified by using the "mixed propagator" developed under a diagrammatic representation of the in-in formalism.
  • Non-attractor inflation is known as the only single field inflationary scenario that can violate non-Gaussianity consistency relation with the Bunch-Davies vacuum state and generate large local non-Gaussianity. However, it is also known that the non-attractor inflation by itself is incomplete and should be followed by a phase of slow-roll attractor. Moreover, there is a transition process between these two phases. In the past literature, this transition was approximated as instant and the evolution of non-Gaussianity in this phase was not fully studied. In this paper, we follow the detailed evolution of the non-Gaussianity through the transition phase into the slow-roll attractor phase, considering different types of transition. We find that the transition process has important effect on the size of the local non-Gaussianity. We first compute the net contribution of the non-Gaussianities at the end of inflation in canonical non-attractor models. If the curvature perturbations keep evolving during the transition - such as in the case of smooth transition or some sharp transition scenarios - the $\mathcal{O}(1)$ local non-Gaussianity generated in the non-attractor phase can be completely erased by the subsequent evolution, although the consistency relation remains violated. In extremal cases of sharp transition where the super-horizon modes freeze immediately right after the end of the non-attractor phase, the original non-attractor result can be recovered. We also study models with non-canonical kinetic terms, and find that the transition can typically contribute a suppression factor in the squeezed bispectrum, but the final local non-Gaussianity can still be made parametrically large.
  • The inflationary universe can be viewed as a "Cosmological Collider" with energy of Hubble scale, producing very massive particles and recording their characteristic signals in primordial non-Gaussianities. To utilize this collider to explore any new physics at very high scales, it is a prerequisite to understand the background signals from the particle physics Standard Model. In this paper we describe the Standard Model background of the Cosmological Collider.
  • We work out the Standard Model (SM) mass spectrum during inflation with quantum corrections, and explore its observable consequences in the squeezed limit of non-Gaussianity. Both non-Higgs and Higgs inflation models are studied in detail. We also illustrate how some inflationary loop diagrams can be computed neatly by Wick-rotating the inflation background to Euclidean signature and by dimensional regularization.
  • We present a systematic introduction to the diagrammatic method for practical calculations in inflationary cosmology, based on Schwinger-Keldysh path integral formalism. We show in particular that the diagrammatic rules can be derived directly from a classical Lagrangian even in the presence of derivative couplings. Furthermore, we use quasi-single-field inflation as an example to show how this formalism, combined with the trick of mixed propagator, can significantly simplify the calculation of some in-in correlation functions. The resulting bispectrum includes the lighter scalar case ($m<3H/2$) that has been previously studied, and the heavier scalar case ($m>3H/2$) that has not been explicitly computed for this model. The latter provides a concrete example of quantum primordial standard clocks, in which the clock signals can be observably large.
  • It is generally expected that heavy fields are present during inflation, which can leave their imprint in late-time cosmological observables. The main signature of these fields is a small amount of distinctly shaped non-Gaussianity, which if detected, would provide a wealth of information about the particle spectrum of the inflationary Universe. Here we investigate to what extent these signatures can be detected or constrained using futuristic 21-cm surveys. We construct model-independent templates that extract the squeezed-limit behavior of the bispectrum, and examine their overlap with standard inflationary shapes and secondary non-Gaussianities. We then use these templates to forecast detection thresholds for different masses and couplings using a 3D reconstruction of modes during the dark ages ($z\sim 30-100$). We consider interactions of several broad classes of models and quantify their detectability as a function of the baseline of a dark ages interferometer. Our analysis shows that there exists the tantalizing possibility of discovering new particles with different masses and interactions with future 21-cm surveys.
  • Primordial features are one of the most important extensions of the Standard Model of cosmology, providing a wealth of information on the primordial universe, ranging from discrimination between inflation and alternative scenarios, new particle detection, to fine structures in the inflationary potential. We study the prospects of future large-scale structure (LSS) surveys on the detection and constraints of these features. We classify primordial feature models into several classes, and for each class we present a simple template of power spectrum that encodes the essential physics. We study how well the most ambitious LSS surveys proposed to date, including both spectroscopic and photometric surveys, will be able to improve the constraints with respect to the current Planck data. We find that these LSS surveys will significantly improve the experimental sensitivity on features signals that are oscillatory in scales, due to the 3D information. For a broad range of models, these surveys will be able to reduce the errors of the amplitudes of the features by a factor of 5 or more, including several interesting candidates identified in the recent Planck data. Therefore, LSS surveys offer an impressive opportunity for primordial feature discovery in the next decade or two. We also compare the advantages of both types of surveys.
  • Detecting a deviation from a featureless primordial power spectrum of fluctuations would give profound insight into the physics of the primordial Universe. Depending on their nature, primordial features can either provide direct evidence for the inflation scenario or pin down details of the inflation model. Thus far, using the cosmic microwave background (CMB) we have only been able to put stringent constraints on the amplitude of features, but no significant evidence has been found for such signals. Here we explore the limit of the experimental reach in constraining such features using 21 cm tomography at high redshift. A measurement of the 21 cm power spectrum from the Dark Ages is generally considered as the ideal experiment for early Universe physics, with potentially access to a large number of modes. We consider three different categories of theoretically motivated models: the sharp feature models, resonance models, and standard clock models. We study the improvements on bounds on features as a function of the total number of observed modes and identify parameter degeneracies. The detectability depends critically on the amplitude, frequency and scale-location of the features, as well as the angular and redshift resolution of the experiment. We quantify these effects by considering different fiducial models. Our forecast shows that a cosmic variance limited 21 cm experiment measuring fluctuations in the redshift range $30\leq z \leq 100$ with a 0.01-MHz bandwidth and sub-arcminute angular resolution could potentially improve bounds by several orders of magnitude for most features compared to current Planck bounds. At the same time, 21 cm tomography also opens up a unique window into features that are located on very small scales.
  • We calculate 1-loop corrections to the Schwinger-Keldysh propagators of Standard-Model-like fields of spin-0, 1/2, and 1, with all renormalizable interactions during inflation. We pay special attention to the late-time divergences of loop corrections, and show that the divergences can be resummed into finite results in the late-time limit using dynamical renormalization group method. This is our first step toward studying both the standard model and new physics in the primordial universe.
  • Since Hubble and Lamaitre's discovery of the expanding universe using galaxies till the recent discovery of the accelerating universe using standard candles, direct measurements of the evolution of the scale factor of the universe a(t) have played central roles in establishing the standard model of cosmology. In this letter, we show that such a measurement may be extended to the primordial universe using massive fields as standard clocks, providing a direct evidence for the scenario responsible for the Big Bang. This is a short and non-technical introduction to the idea of classical and quantum primordial standard clocks.
  • Inflation models are numerous. It is extremely difficult, if possible at all, to identify the actual underlying inflation model of our primordial universe. Thus, for the purpose of proving/falsifying inflation and using inflation to probe new physics, model independent approaches are crucial. Massive fields play a uniquely important role in those missions. This short review is based on a talk by one of the authors (YW) in the 2nd LeCosPA Symposium.
  • In this paper, we point out and study a generic type of signals existing in the primordial universe models, which can be used to model-independently distinguish the inflation scenario from alternatives. These signals are generated by massive fields that function as standard clocks. The role of massive fields as standard clocks has been realized in previous works. Although the existence of such massive fields is generic, the previous realizations require sharp features to classically excite the oscillations of the massive clock fields. Here, we point out that the quantum fluctuations of massive fields can actually serve the same purpose as the standard clocks. We show that they are also able to directly record the defining property of the scenario type, namely, the scale factor of the primordial universe as a function of time a(t), but through shape-dependent oscillatory features in non-Gaussianities. Since quantum fluctuating massive fields exist in any realistic primordial universe models, these quantum primordial standard clock signals are present in any inflation models, and should exist quite generally in alternative-to-inflation scenarios as well. However, the amplitude of such signals is very model-dependent.
  • In this paper, we study several issues in the linear equation-of-motion (EoM) and in-in approaches of computing the two-point correlation functions in multi-field inflation. We prove the equivalence between this EoM approach and the first-principle in-in formalism. We check this equivalence using several explicit examples, including cases with scale-invariant corrections and scale-dependent features. Motivated by the explicit proof, we show that the usual procedures in these approaches can be extended and applied to some interesting model categories beyond what has been studied in the literature so far. These include the density perturbations with strong couplings and correlated multi-field initial states.
  • Oscillating massive fields in the primordial universe can be used as Standard Clocks. The ticks of these oscillations induce features in the density perturbations, which directly record the time evolution of the scale factor of the primordial universe, thus if detected, provide a direct evidence for the inflation scenario or the alternatives. In this paper, we construct a full inflationary model of primordial Standard Clock and study its predictions on the density perturbations. This model provides a full realization of several key features proposed previously. We compare the theoretical predictions from inflation and alternative scenarios with the Planck 2013 temperature data on Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB), and identify a statistically marginal but interesting candidate. We discuss how future CMB temperature and polarization data, non-Gaussianity analysis and Large Scale Structure data may be used to further test or constrain the Standard Clock signals.
  • We study the most general effects of relic vector fields on the inflationary background and density perturbations. Such effects are observable if the number of inflationary e-folds is close to the minimum requirement to solve the horizon problem. We show that this can potentially explain two CMB large scale anomalies: the quadrupole-octopole alignment and the quadrupole power suppression. We discuss its effect on the parity anomaly. We also provide analytical template for more detailed data comparison.
  • Standard Clocks in the primordial epoch leave a special type of features in the primordial perturbations, which can be used to directly measure the scale factor of the primordial universe as a function of time a(t), thus discriminating between inflation and alternatives. We have started to search for such signals in the Planck 2013 data using the key predictions of the Standard Clock. In this Letter, we summarize the key predictions of the Standard Clock and present an interesting candidate example in Planck 2013 data. Motivated by this candidate, we construct and compute full Standard Clock models and use the more complete prediction to make more extensive comparison with data. Although this candidate is not yet statistically significant, we use it to illustrate how Standard Clocks appear in Cosmic Microwave Background and how they can be further tested by future data. We also use it to motivate more detailed theoretical model building.
  • The ongoing and future experiments will measure the B-mode from different sky coverage and frequency bands, with the potential to reveal non-trivial features in polarization map. In this work we study the TT, TB, EB and BB correlations associated with the B-mode polarization of CMB map in models of charged anisotropic inflation. The model contains a chaotic-type large field complex inflaton which is charged under the $U(1)$ gauge field. We calculate the statistical anisotropies generated in the power spectra of the curvature perturbation, the tensor perturbation and their cross-correlation. It is shown that the asymmetry in tensor power spectrum is a very sensitive probe of the gauge coupling. While the level of statistical anisotropy in temperature power spectrum can be small and satisfy the observational bounds, the interactions from the gauge coupling can induce large directional dependence in tensor modes. This will leave interesting anisotropic fingerprints in various correlations involving the B-mode polarization such as the TB cross-correlation which may be detected in upcoming Planck polarization data. In addition, the TT correlation receives an anisotropic contribution from the tensor sector which naturally decays after $l \gtrsim 100$. We expect that the mechanism of using tensor sector to induce asymmetry at low $l$ to be generic which can also be applied to address other low $l$ CMB anomalies.
  • We examine the impact of different anisotropic relics on inflation, in particular the predictions on the density perturbations. These relics can be the source of the large scale anomalies in the cosmic microwave background. There are two different types of background relics, one from the matter sector and the other purely from the metric. Although the angular-dependence of the statistical anisotropy in both cases are degenerate, the scale-dependence are observationally distinctive. In addition, we demonstrate that non-Bunch-Davies vacuum states can extend the statistical anisotropy to much shorter scales, and leave a scale-dependence that is insensitive to the different backgrounds but sensitive to the initial quantum state.
  • In this work we present an inflationary mechanism based on fluid dynamics. Starting with the action for a single barotropic perfect fluid, we outline the procedure to calculate the power spectrum and the bispectrum of the curvature perturbation. It is shown that a perfect barotropic fluid naturally gives rise to a non-attractor inflationary universe in which the curvature perturbation is not frozen on super-horizon scales. We show that a scale-invariant power spectrum can be obtained with the local non-Gaussianity parameter $f_{NL}= 5/2$.
  • A detection of large local form non-Gaussianity is considered to be able to rule out all single field inflation models. This statement is based on a single field consistency condition. Despite the awareness of some implicit assumptions in the derivation of this condition and the demonstration of corresponding examples that illustrate these caveats, to date there is still no explicit and self-consistent model which can serve as a counterexample to this statement. We present such a model in this Letter.
  • In non-attractor single-field inflation models producing a scale-invariant power spectrum, the curvature perturbation on super-horizon scales grows as ${\cal R}\propto a^3$. This is so far the only known class of self-consistent single-field models with a Bunch-Davies initial state that can produce a large squeezed-limit bispectrum violating Maldacena's consistency relation. Given the importance of this result, we calculate the bispectrum with three different methods: using quantum field theory calculations in two different gauges, and classical calculations (the $\delta N$ formalism). All the results agree, giving the local-form bispectrum parameter of $f^{local}_{NL}=5(1+c_s^2)/(4c_s^2)$. This result is valid for arbitrary values of the speed of sound parameter, $c_s$, for a particular non-attractor model we consider in this paper.
  • We introduce a generic mechanism that can extend the effects of relic anisotropies at the beginning of inflation to relatively much shorter scales in density perturbations. This is induced by non-Bunch-Davies states of the quantum fluctuations, and can show up in the non-oscillatory components of the density perturbations. This mechanism works for general forms of anisotropies, and, to illustrate it, we use an example of relic vector field. The detailed scale-dependence of these anisotropies can be used to probe the initial quantum state of our universe.
  • Classically oscillating massive fields can be used as "standard clocks" in the primordial universe. They generate features in primordial density perturbations that directly record the scale factor evolution a(t). Detecting and measuring these "fingerprint" signals is challenging but would provide a direct evidence for a specific primordial universe paradigm. In this paper, such a search is performed for the power spectrum of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) anisotropies using the WMAP7 data. Although a good fit to the data privileges a scale around k=0.01 Mpc^(-1), we do not find statistical significance for, neither against, the presence of any feature. We then forecast the expected constraints a Planck-like CMB experiment can impose on the fingerprint parameters by using Markov-Chain-Monte-Carlo (MCMC) methods on mock data. We exhibit a high sensitivity zone for wavenumbers ranging from 0.01 Mpc^(-1) to 0.1 Mpc^(-1) in which fingerprints show up first on the posterior probability distribution of the wavenumber at which they occur, and then on the modulation frequency. Within the sensitivity zone, we show that the inflationary paradigm can be inferred from a single feature generating at least a 20% modulation of the primordial power spectrum. This minimal value sensitively depends on the modulation frequency.