• Energy efficiency has become one of the top design criteria for current computing systems. The dynamic voltage and frequency scaling (DVFS) has been widely adopted by laptop computers, servers, and mobile devices to conserve energy, while the GPU DVFS is still at a certain early age. This paper aims at exploring the impact of GPU DVFS on the application performance and power consumption, and furthermore, on energy conservation. We survey the state-of-the-art GPU DVFS characterizations, and then summarize recent research works on GPU power and performance models. We also conduct real GPU DVFS experiments on NVIDIA Fermi and Maxwell GPUs. According to our experimental results, GPU DVFS has significant potential for energy saving. The effect of scaling core voltage/frequency and memory voltage/frequency depends on not only the GPU architectures, but also the characteristic of GPU applications.
  • Memory access efficiency is a key factor in fully utilizing the computational power of graphics processing units (GPUs). However, many details of the GPU memory hierarchy are not released by GPU vendors. In this paper, we propose a novel fine-grained microbenchmarking approach and apply it to three generations of NVIDIA GPUs, namely Fermi, Kepler and Maxwell, to expose the previously unknown characteristics of their memory hierarchies. Specifically, we investigate the structures of different GPU cache systems, such as the data cache, the texture cache and the translation look-aside buffer (TLB). We also investigate the throughput and access latency of GPU global memory and shared memory. Our microbenchmark results offer a better understanding of the mysterious GPU memory hierarchy, which will facilitate the software optimization and modelling of GPU architectures. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to reveal the cache properties of Kepler and Maxwell GPUs, and the superiority of Maxwell in shared memory performance under bank conflict.