• By measuring the spatial distribution of differential conductance near impurities on Fe sites, we have obtained the quasi-particle interference (QPI) patterns in the (Li$_{1-x}$Fe$_x$)OHFe$_{1-y}$Zn$_y$Se superconductor with only electron Fermi surfaces. By taking the Fourier transform on these patterns, we investigate the scattering features between the two circles of electron pockets formed by folding or hybridization. We treat the data by using the recent theoretical approach [arXiv:1710.09089] which is specially designed for the impurity induced bound states. It is found that the superconducting gap sign is reversed on the two electron pockets, which can be directly visualized by the phase-referenced QPI technique, indicating that the Cooper pairing is induced by the repulsive interaction. Our results further show that this method is also applicable for data measured for multiple impurities, which provides an easy and feasible way for detecting the gap function of unconventional superconductors.
  • By using solid-state reactions, we successfully synthesize new oxyselenides CsV$_2$Se$_{2-x}$O (x = 0, 0.5). These compounds containing V$_2$O planar layers with a square lattice crystallize in the CeCr$_2$Si$_2$C structure with the space group of $P4/mmm$. Another new compound V$_2$Se$_2$O which crystallizes in space group $I4/mmm$ is fabricated by topochemical deintercalation of cesium from CsV$_2$Se$_2$O powder with iodine in tetrahydrofuran(THF). Resistivity measurements show a semiconducting behavior for CsV$_2$Se$_2$O, while a metallic behavior for CsV$_2$Se$_{1.5}$O, and an insulating feature for V$_2$Se$_2$O. A charge- or spin-density wave-like anomaly has been observed at 168 K for CsV$_2$Se$_2$O and 150 K for CsV$_2$Se$_{1.5}$O, respectively. And these anomalies are also confirmed by the magnetic susceptibility measurements. The resistivity in V$_2$Se$_2$O exhibits an anomalous log(1/$T$) temperature dependence, which is similar to the case in parent phase or very underdoped cuprates indicating the involvement of strong correlation. Magnetic susceptibility measurements show that the magnetic moment per V-site in V$_2$Se$_2$O is much larger than that of CsV$_2$Se$_{2-x}$O, which again suggests the correlation induced localization effect in the former.
  • Chemical substitution during growth is a well-established method to manipulate electronic states of quantum materials, and leads to rich spectra of phase diagrams in cuprate and iron-based superconductors. Here we report a novel and generic strategy to achieve nonvolatile electron doping in series of (i.e. 11 and 122 structures) Fe-based superconductors by ionic liquid gating induced protonation at room temperature. Accumulation of protons in bulk compounds induces superconductivity in the parent compounds, and enhances the Tc largely in some superconducting ones. Furthermore, the existence of proton in the lattice enables the first proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) study to probe directly superconductivity. Using FeS as a model system, our NMR study reveals an emergent high-Tc phase with no coherence peak which is hard to measure by NMR with other isotopes. This novel electric-field-induced proton evolution opens up an avenue for manipulation of competing electronic states (e.g. Mott insulators), and may provide an innovative way for a broad perspective of NMR measurements with greatly enhanced detecting resolution.
  • We investigate the vortex lattice and vortex bound states in CsFe$_2$As$_2$ single crystals by scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy (STM/STS) under various magnetic fields. A possible structural transition of vortex lattice is observed with the increase of magnetic field, i.e., the vortex lattice changes from a distorted hexagonal lattice to a distorted tetragonal one at the magnetic field near 0.5 T. We obtain some qualitative support from a simple calculation of the vortex-interaction energy. It is found that a stripe-like vortex structure of the hexagonal and square lattice emerges in the crossover region. The vortex bound state is also observed in the vortex center. The tunneling spectra crossing a vortex show that, the bound-state peak position holds near zero bias with STM tip moving away from the vortex core center. We also find that the vortex core size is larger than the coherence length when the vortex bound state exists. Our investigations provide new experimental information to both the vortex lattice and the vortex bound states in this iron-based superconductor.
  • It is widely perceived that the correlation effect may play an important role in several unconventional superconducting families, such as cuprate, iron-based and heavy-fermion superconductors. The application of high pressure can tune the ground state properties and balance the localization and itineracy of electrons in correlated systems, which may trigger unconventional superconductivity. Moreover, non-centrosymmetric structure may induce the spin triplet pairing which is very rare in nature. Here, we report a new compound ScZrCo1-${\delta}$ crystallizing in the Ti2Ni structure with the space group of FD3-MS without a spatial inversion center. The resistivity of the material at ambient pressure shows a bad metal and weak semiconducting behavior. Furthermore, specific heat and magnetic susceptibility measurements yield a rather large value of Wilson ratio ~4.47. Both suggest a ground state with correlation effect. By applying pressure, the up-going behavior of resistivity in lowering temperature at ambient pressure is suppressed and gradually it becomes metallic. At a pressure of about 19.5 GPa superconductivity emerges. Up to 36.05 GPa, a superconducting transition at about 3.6 K with a quite high upper critical field is observed. Our discovery here provides a new platform for investigating the relationship between correlation effect and superconductivity.
  • Caroli-de Gennes-Martricon (CdGM) states were predicted in 1964 as low energy excitations within vortex cores of type-II superconductors. In the quantum limit, namely $T/T_\mathrm{c} \ll \Delta/E_\mathrm{F}$, the energy levels of these states were predicted to be discrete with the basic levels at $E_\mu = \pm \mu \Delta^2/E_\mathrm{F}$ ($\mu = 1/2$, $3/2$, $5/2$, ...). However, due to the small ratio of $\Delta/E_\mathrm{F}$ in most type-II superconductors, it is very difficult to observe the discrete CdGM states, but rather a symmetric peak appears at zero-bias at the vortex center. Here we report the clear observation of these discrete energy levels of CdGM states in FeTe$_{0.55}$Se$_{0.45}$. The rather stable energies of these states versus space clearly validates our conclusion. Analysis based on the energies of these CdGM states indicates that the Fermi energy in the present system is very small.
  • In conventional superconductors, very narrow superconducting fluctuation regions are observed above $T_c$ because of the strong overlapping of Cooper pairs in a coherence volume. In the bulk form of iron chalcogenide superconductor FeSe, it is argued that the system may locate in the crossover region of BCS to BEC, indicating a strong superconducting fluctuation. In this respect, we have carried out measurements of magnetization, specific heat and Nernst effect on FeSe single crystals in order to investigate the superconducting fluctuation effect near $T_c$. The region of diamagnetization induced by superconducting fluctuation seems very narrow above $T_c$. The crossing point of temperature dependent magnetization curves measured at different magnetic fields, which appears in many systems of cuprate superconductors and is regarded as indication of strong critical fluctuation, is however absent. The magnetization data can be scaled based on the Ginzburg-Landau fluctuation theory for a quasi-two-dimensional system, but the scaling result cannot be described by the theoretical function of the fluctuation theory because of the limited fluctuation regions. The specific heat jump near $T_c$ is rather sharp without the trace of strong superconducting fluctuation. This is also supported by the Nernst effect measurements which indicate a very limited region for vortex motion above $T_c$. Associated with very small value of Ginzburg number and further analyses, we conclude that the superconducting fluctuation is very weak above $T_c$ in this material. Our results are strongly against the picture of significant phase fluctuation in FeSe single crystals, although the system has a very limited overlapping of Cooper pairs in the coherence volume. This dichotomy provides new insights into the superconducting mechanism when the system is with a dilute superfluid density.
  • By using high pressure synthesis method, we have fabricated the potassium doped para-terphenyl. The temperature dependence of magnetization measured in both zero-field-cooled and field-cooled processes shows step like transitions at about 125 K. This confirms earlier report about the possible superconductivity like transition in the same system. However, the magnetization hysteresis loop exhibits a weak ferromagnetic background. After removing this ferromagnetic background, a Meissner effect like magnetic shielding can be found. A simple estimate on the diamagnetization of this step tells that the diamagnetic volume is only about 0.0427% at low temperatures, if we assume the penetration depth is much smaller than the size of possible superconducting grains. This magnetization transition does not shift with magnetic field but is suppressed and becomes almost invisible above 1.0 T. The resistivity measurements are failed because of an extremely large resistance. By using the same method, we also fabricated the potassium doped para-quaterphenyl. A similar step like transition at about 125 K was also observed by magnetization measurement. Since there is an unknown positive background and the diamagnetic volume is too small, it is insufficient to conclude that this step is derived from superconductivity although it looks like.
  • Iron pnictides are the only known family of unconventional high-temperature superconductors besides cuprates. Until recently, it was widely accepted that superconductivity is spin-fluctuation driven and intimately related to their fermiology, specifically, hole and electron pockets separated by the same wave vector that characterizes the dominant spin fluctuations, and supporting order parameters (OP) of opposite signs. This picture was questioned after the discovery of a new family, based on the FeSe layers, either intercalated or in the monolayer form. The critical temperatures there reach ~40 K, the same as in optimally doped bulk FeSe - despite the fact that intercalation removes the hole pockets from the Fermi level and, seemingly, undermines the basis for the spin-fluctuation theory and the idea of a sign-changing OP. In this paper, using the recently proposed phase-sensitive quasiparticle interference technique, we show that in LiOH intercalated FeSe compound the OP does change sign, albeit within the electronic pockets, and not between the hole and electron ones. This result unifies the pairing mechanism of iron based superconductors with or without the hole Fermi pockets and supports the conclusion that spin fluctuations play the key role in electron pairing.
  • Specific heat has been measured in FeSe single crystals down to 0.414 K under magnetic fields up to 16 T. A sharp specific heat anomaly at about 8.2 K is observed and is related to the superconducting transition. Another jump of specific heat is observed at about 1.08 K which may either reflect an antiferromagnetic transition of the system or a superconducting transition arising from Al impurity. We would argue that this anomaly in low temperature region may be the long sought antiferromagnetic transition in FeSe. Global fitting in wide temperature region shows that the models with a single contribution with isotropic s-wave, anisotropic s-wave, and d-wave gap all do not work well, nor the two isotropic s-wave gaps. We then fit the data by a model with two components in which one has the gap function of $\Delta_0(1+\alpha cos2\theta)$. To have a good global fitting and the entropy conservation for the low temperature transition, we reach a conclusion that the gap minimum should be smaller than 0.15 meV ($\alpha$ = 0.9 to 1), indicating that the superconducting gap(s) are highly anisotropic. Our results are very consistent with the gap structure derived recently from the scanning tunneling spectroscopy measurements and yield specific heat contributions of about 32\% weight from the hole pocket and 68\% from the electron pockets.
  • By using a hydrothermal ion-exchange method, we have successfully grown superconducting crystals of LiOHFeS with ${T_c}$ of about 2.8 K. Being different from the sister sample (Li${_{1-x}}$Fe${_x}$)OHFeSe, the energy dispersion spectrum analysis on LiOHFeS shows that the Fe/S ratio is very close to 1:1, suggesting an almost charge neutrality and less electron doping in the FeS planes of the system. Comparing with the non superconducting LiOHFeS crystal, each peak of the X-ray diffraction pattern of the superconducting crystal splits into two, and the diffraction peaks locating at lower reflection angles are consistent with that of non-superconducting ones. The rest set of diffraction peaks with higher reflection angles is corresponding to the superconducting phase, suggesting that the superconducting phase may has a shrunk c-axis lattice constant. Magnetization measurements indicate that the magnetic shielding due to superconductivity can be quite high under a weak magnetic field. The resistivity measurements under various magnetic fields show that the upper critical field is quite low, which is similar to the tetragonal FeS superconductor.
  • Weyl semimetal defines a material with three dimensional Dirac cones which appear in pair due to the breaking of spatial inversion or time reversal symmetry. Superconductivity is the state of quantum condensation of paired electrons. Turning a Weyl semimetal into superconducting state is very important in having some unprecedented discoveries. In this work, by doing resistive measurements on a recently recognized Weyl semimetal TaP under pressure up to about 100 GPa, we observe superconductivity at about 70 GPa. The superconductivity retains when the pressure is released. The systematic evolutions of resistivity and magnetoresistance with pressure are well interpreted by the relative shift between the chemical potential and paired Weyl points. Calculations based on the density functional theory also illustrate the structure transition at about 70GPa, the phase at higher pressure may host superconductivity. Our discovery of superconductivity in TaP by pressure will stimulate further study on superconductivity in Weyl semimetals.
  • Measurements on resistivity and magnetic susceptibility have been carried out for Bi single crystals under pressures up to 10.5GPa. The temperature dependent resistivity shows a semimetallic behavior at ambient and low pressures (below about 1.6GPa). This is followed by an upturn of resistivity in low temperature region when the pressure is increased, which is explained as a semiconductor behavior. This feature gradually gets enhanced up to a pressure of about 2.52GPa. Then a non-monotonic temperature dependent resistivity appears upon further increasing pressure, which is accompanied by a strong suppression to the low temperature resistivity upturn. Simultaneously, a superconducting transition occurs at about 3.92K under a pressure of about 2.63GPa. With further increasing pressure, a second superconducting transition emerges at about 7K under about 2.8GPa. For these two superconducting states, the superconductivity induced magnetic screening volumes are quite large. As the pressure further increased to 8.1GPa, we observe the third superconducting transition at about 8.2K. The resistivity measurements under magnetic field allow us to determine the upper critical fields $\mu_0 H_{c2}$ of the superconducting phases. The upper critical field for the phase with $T_c=3.92$K is extremely low. Based on the Werthamer-Helfand-Hohenberg (WHH) theory, the estimated value of $\mu_0 H_{c2}$ for this phase is about 0.103T. While the upper critical field for the phase with $T_c$=7K is very high with a value of about 4.56T. Finally, we present a pressure dependent phase diagram of Bi single crystals. Our results reveal the interesting and rich physics in bismuth single crystals under high pressure.
  • The magnetoresistance and magnetic torque of FeS are measured in magnetic fields $B$ of up to 18 T down to a temperature of 0.03 K. The superconducting transition temperature is found to be $T_c$ = 4.1 K, and the anisotropy ratio of the upper critical field $B_{c2}$ at $T_c$ is estimated from the initial slopes to be $\Gamma(T_c)$ = 6.9. $B_{c2}(0)$ is estimated to be 2.2 and 0.36 T for $B \parallel ab$ and $c$, respectively. Quantum oscillations are observed in both the resistance and torque. Two frequencies $F$ = 0.15 and 0.20 kT are resolved and assigned to a quasi-two-dimensional Fermi surface cylinder. The carrier density and Sommerfeld coefficient associated with this cylinder are estimated to be 5.8 $\times$ 10$^{-3}$ carriers/Fe and 0.48 mJ/(K$^2$mol), respectively. Other Fermi surface pockets still remain to be found. Band-structure calculations are performed and compared to the experimental results.
  • We investigate the electronic properties of the tetragonal FeS superconductor by using scanning tunneling microscope/spectroscopy. It is found that the typical tunneling spectrum on the top layer of sulfur can be nicely fitted with an anisotropic s-wave or a combination of two superconducting components in which one may have a highly anisotropic or nodal like superconducting gap. The fittings lead to the maximum superconducting gap $\Delta_{max}\approx$ 0.90$\;$meV, which yields a ratio of 2$\Delta_{max}/k_BT_c\approx$ 4.65. This value is larger than that of the predicted value 3.53 by the BCS theory in the weak coupling limit, indicating a strong coupling superconductivity. Two kinds of defects are observed on the surface, which can be assigned to the defects on the S sites (four-fold image) and Fe sites (dumbbell shape). Impurity induced resonance states are found only for the former defects and stay at zero-bias energy.
  • Resistive, magnetization, torque, specific heat and scanning tunneling microscopy measurements are carried out on the hole heavily doped CsFe$_2$As$_2$ single crystals. A characteristic temperature $T^*\sim13$ K, which is several times higher than the superconducting transition temperature $T_c=2.15$ K, is observed and possibly related to the superconducting fluctuation or the pseudogap state. A diamagnetic signal detected by torque measurements starts from the superconducting state, keeps finite and vanishes gradually until a temperature near $T^*$. Temperature dependent resistivity and specific heat also show kinks near $T^*$. An asymmetric gap-like feature with the energy of 8.4 meV and a symmetric superconducting related gap of 2.2 meV on the scanning tunneling spectra are detected, and these pseudogap-related features disappear at temperatures up to at least 9 K. These observations by different experimental tools suggest the possible existence of superconducting fluctuation or pseudogap state in the temperature range up to 4 - 6 times of $T_c$ in CsFe$_2$As$_2$.
  • By using a hydrothermal method, we have successfully grown crystals of the newly discovered superconductor FeS, which has an isostructure of the iron based superconductor FeSe. The superconductivity appears at about 4.5K, as revealed by both resistive and magnetization measurements. It is found that the upper critical field is relatively low, with however an rather large anisotropy $\Gamma=[(dH_{c2}^{ab}/dT)/(dH_{c2}^{c}/dT)]_{T_c}\approx5.8$. A huge magnetoresistivity (290$\%$ at 9T and 10K, ${H}$ $\parallel$ c-axis) together with a non-linear behavior of Hall resistivity vs. external field are observed. A two-band model is applied to fit the magnetoresistance and non-linear transverse resistivity, yielding the basic parameters of the electron and hole bands.
  • The recently discovered (Li${_{1-x}}$Fe${_x}$)OHFeSe superconductor with $T_c$ about 40K provides a good platform for investigating the magnetization and electrical transport properties of FeSe-based superconductors. By using a hydrothermal ion-exchange method, we have successfully grown crystals of (Li${_{1-x}}$Fe${_x}$)OHFeSe. X-ray diffraction on the sample shows the single crystalline PbO-type structure with the c-axis preferential orientation. Magnetic susceptibility and resistive measurements show an onset superconducting transition at around ${T_c}$=38.3K. Using the magnetization hysteresis loops and Bean critical state model, a large critical current ${J_s}$ is observed in low temperature region. The critical current density is suppressed exponentially with increasing magnetic field. Temperature dependencies of resistivity under various currents and fields are measured, revealing a robust superconducting current density and bulk superconductivity.
  • Low temperature specific heat has been measured in superconductor $\beta$-FeS with T$_c$ = 4.55 K. It is found that the low temperature electronic specific heat C$_e$/T can be fitted to a linear relation in the low temperature region, but fails to be described by an exponential relation as expected by an s-wave gap. We try fittings to the data with different gap structures and find that a model with one or two nodal gaps can fit the data. Under a magnetic field, the field induced specific heat $\Delta\gamma$=[C$_e$(H)-C$_e$(0)]/T shows the Volovik relation $\Delta\gamma_e(H)\propto \sqrt{H}$, suggesting the presence of nodal gap(s) in this material.
  • In the iron based superconductors, one of the on-going frontier studies is about the pairing mechanism. The recent interest concerns the high temperature superconductivity and its intimate reason in the monolayer FeSe thin films. The challenge here is how the double superconducting gaps seen by the scanning tunnelling spectroscopy (STS) associate however to only one set of Fermi pockets seen by the angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). The recently discovered (Li1-xFexOH)FeSe phase with Tc=40 K provides a good platform to check the fundamental problems. Here we report the STS study on the (Li1-xFexOH)FeSe single crystals. The STS spectrum clearly indicates the presence of double anisotropic gaps with maximum magnitudes of Delta_1=14.3 meV and Delta_2=8.6 meV, and mimics that of the monolayer FeSe thin film. Further analysis based on the quasiparticle interference (QPI) allows us to rule out the d-wave gap, and for the first time assign the larger (smaller) gap to the outer (inner) hybridized Fermi pockets associating with the dxy (dxz/dyz) orbitals, respectively. The huge value Delta_1/k_BT_c = 8.7 discovered here undoubtedly proves the strong coupling mechanism in the present superconducting system.
  • We report the results of our investigation of SrPt3P, a recently discovered strong-coupling superconductor with Tc = 8.4 K, by application of high physical pressure and by chemical doping. We study hole-doped SrPt3P, which was theoretically predicted to have a higher Tc, resistively, magnetically, and calorimetrically. Here we present the results of these studies and discuss their implications.
  • We have conducted extensive investigations on the magnetization and its dynamical relaxation on a Ba$_{0.66}$K$_{0.32}$BiO$_{3+\delta}$ single crystal. It is found that the magnetization relaxation rate is rather weak compared with that in the cuprate superconductors, indicating a higher collective vortex pinning potential (or activation energy), although the intrinsic pinning potential $U_\mathrm{c}$ is weaker. Detailed analysis leads to the following discoveries: (1) A second-peak effect on the magnetization-hysteresis-loop was observed in a very wide temperature region, ranging from 2K to 24K. Its general behavior looks like that in YBa$_2$Cu$_3$O$_7$; (2) Associated with the second peak effect, the magnetization relaxation rate is inversely related to the transient superconducting current density $J_\mathrm{s}$ revealing a quite general and similar mechanism for the second peak effect in many high temperature superconductors; (3) A detailed analysis based on the collective creep model reveals a large glassy exponent $\mu$ and a small intrinsic pinning potential $U_\mathrm{c}$; (4) Investigation on the volume pinning force density shows that the data can be scaled to the formula $F_{p}\propto b^p(1-b)^q$ with $p=2.79$ and $q=3.14$, here $b$ is the reduced magnetic field to the irreversible magnetic field. The maximum normalized pinning force density appears near $b\approx0.47$. Finally, a vortex phase diagram is drawn for showing the phase transitions or crossovers between different vortex phases.
  • To explore new superconductors beyond the copper-based and iron-based systems is very important. The Ru element locates just below the Fe in the periodic table and behaves like the Fe in many ways. One of the common thread to induce high temperature superconductivity is to introduce moderate correlation into the system. In this paper, we report the significant enhancement of superconducting transition temperature from 3.84K to 5.77K by using a pressure only of 1.74 GPa in LaRu2P2 which has an iso-structure of the iron-based 122 superconductors. The ab-initio calculation shows that the superconductivity in LaRu2P2 at ambient pressure can be explained by the McMillan's theory with strong electron-phonon coupling. However, it is difficult to interpret the significant enhancement of Tc versus pressure within this picture. Detailed analysis of the pressure induced evolution of resistivity and upper critical field Hc2(T) reveals that the increases of Tc with pressure may be accompanied by the involvement of extra electronic correlation effect. This suggests that the Ru-based system has some commonality as the Fe-based superconductors.
  • The recently discovered layered BiS2-based superconductors have attracted a great deal of interest due to their structural similarity to cuprate and iron-pnictide superconductors. We have performed Raman scattering measurements on two superconducting crystals NdO0.5F0.5BiS2 (Tc = 4.5 K) and NdO0.7F0.3BiS2 (Tc = 4.8 K). The observed Raman phonon modes are assigned with the aid of first-principles calculations. The asymmetrical phonon mode around 118 cm-1 reveals a small electron-phonon (e-ph) coupling constant 0.16, which is insufficient to generate superconductivity at ~ 4.5 K. In the Raman spectra there exists a clear temperature-dependent hump around 100 cm-1, which can be well understood in term of inter-band vertical transitions around Fermi surface. The transitions get boosted when the particular rectangular-like Fermi surface meets band splitting caused by spin-orbit coupling. It enables a unique and quantitative insight into the band splitting.
  • The superconducting state is formed by the condensation of a large number of Cooper pairs. The normal state electronic properties can give significant influence on the superconducting state. For usual type-II superconductors, the vortices are cylinder like with a round cross-section. For many two dimensional superconductors, such as Cuprates, 2H-NbSe$_2$ etc., albeit the in-plane anisotropy, the vortices generally have a round shape. In this paper we report results based on the scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy measurements on a newly discovered superconductor Ta$_4$Pd$_3$Te$_{16}$. The chain like conducting channels of PdTe$_2$ in Ta$_4$Pd$_3$Te$_{16}$ make a significant anisotropy of the in-plane Fermi velocity. We suggest at least one anisotropic superconducting gap with gap minima or possible node exists in this multiband system. In addition, elongated vortices are observed with an anisotropy of $\xi_{\parallel b}/\xi_{\perp b}\approx 2.5$. Clear Caroli-de-Gennes-Matricon states are also observed within the vortex cores. Our results will initiate the study on the elongated vortices and superconducting mechanism in the new superconductor Ta$_4$Pd$_3$Te$_{16}$.