• We report low temperature scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy studies of Ni-Bi films grown by molecular beam epitaxy. Highly anisotropic and twofold symmetric superconducting gaps are revealed in two distinct composites, Bi-rich NiBi3 and near-equimolar NixBi, both sharing quasi-one-dimensional crystal structure. We further reveal axially elongated vortices in both phases, but Caroli-de Gennes-Matricon states solely within the vortex cores of NiBi3. Intriguingly, although the localized bound state splits energetically off at a finite distance ~10 nm away from a vortex center along the minor axis of elliptic vortex, no splitting is found along the major axis. We attribute the elongated vortices and unusual vortex behaviors to the combined effects of twofold superconducting gap and Fermi velocity. The findings provide a comprehensive understanding of the electron pairing and vortex matter in quasi-one-dimensional superconductors
  • We report on atomic-scale visualization of the structure of infinite-layer cuprate SrCuO2 thin films grown on Nb-doped SrTiO3 substrates by molecular beam epitaxy. In-situ scanning tunneling microscopy study reveals stoichiometric copper oxide (CuO2) plane with a 2 x 2 surface reconstruction, prompted by preferential clustering of four adjacent CuO2 plaquettes. By imaging the subsurface Sr atoms, intra-unit-cell rotational symmetry breaking is observed, which, together with the adjacent CuO2 clustering, can be well accounted for by a periodic up-down buckling of oxygen ions on the CuO2 plane. Further post-annealing leads to an incommensurate stripe structure of the surface layer. Our findings provide important structural information for deeply understanding the electronic structure of superconducting CuO2 plane as well as high temperature superconductivity in cuprates.
  • We report on the direct observation of interface superconductivity in single-unit-cell SnSe2 films grown on graphitized SiC(0001) substrate by means of van der Waals epitaxy. Tunneling spectrum in the superconducting state reveals rather conventional character with a fully gapped order parameter. The occurrence of superconductivity is further confirmed by the presence of vortices under external magnetic field. Through interface engineering, we unravel the mechanism of superconductivity that originates from a two-dimensional electron gas formed at the interface of SnSe2 and graphene. Our finding opens up novel strategies to hunt for and understand interface superconductivity based on van der Waals heterostructures.
  • We report scanning tunneling microscopy investigation on epitaxial ultrathin films of pyrite-type copper disulfide. Layer by layer growth of CuS2 films with a preferential orientation of (111) on SrTiO3(001) and Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+{\delta} substrates is achieved by molecular beam epitaxy growth. For ultrathin films on both kinds of substrates, we observed symmetric tunneling gap around Fermi level that persists up to ~ 15 K. The tunneling gap degrades with either increasing temperature or increasing thickness, suggesting new matter states at the extreme two dimensional limit.
  • A single atomic slice of {\alpha}-tin-stanene-has been predicted to host quantum spin Hall effect at room temperature, offering an ideal platform to study low-dimensional and topological physics. While recent research has intensively focused on monolayer stanene, the quantum size effect in few-layer stanene could profoundly change material properties, but remains unexplored. By exploring the layer degree of freedom, we unexpectedly discover superconductivity in few-layer stanene down to a bilayer grown on PbTe, while bulk {\alpha}-tin is not superconductive. Through substrate engineering, we further realize a transition from a single-band to a two-band superconductor with a doubling of the transition temperature. In-situ angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) together with first-principles calculations elucidate the corresponding band structure. Interestingly, the theory also indicates the existence of a topologically nontrivial band. Our experimental findings open up novel strategies for constructing two-dimensional topological superconductors.
  • Determination of the pairing symmetry in monolayer FeSe films on SrTiO3 is a requisite for understanding the high superconducting transition temperature in this system, which has attracted intense theoretical and experimental studies but remains controversial. Here, by introducing several types of point defects in FeSe monolayer films, we conduct a systematic investigation on the impurity-induced electronic states by spatially resolved scanning tunneling spectroscopy. Ranging from surface adsorption, chemical substitution to intrinsic structural modification, these defects generate a variety of scattering strength, which renders new insights on the pairing symmetry.
  • Using a cryogenic scanning tunneling microscopy, we report the observation of topologically nontrivial superconductivity on a single material of \beta-Bi2Pd films grown by molecular beam epitaxy. The superconducting gap associated with spinless odd-parity pairing opens on the surface and appears much larger than the bulk one due to the Dirac-fermion enhanced parity mixing of surface pair potential. Majorana zero modes (MZMs), supported by such superconducting states, are identified at magnetic vortices. The superconductivity and MZMs exhibit resistance to nonmagnetic defects, characteristic of time-reversal-invariant topological superconductors. Our results demonstrate a simple platform to generate, manipulate and braid MZMs for quantum computation.
  • The discovery of high-temperature superconductivity in FeSe/STO has trigged great research interest to reveal a range of exotic physical phenomena in this novel material. Here we present a temperature dependent magnetotransport measurement for ultrathin FeSe/STO films with different thickness and protection layers. Remarkably, a surprising linear magnetoresistance (LMR) is observed around the superconducting transition temperatures but absent otherwise. The experimental LMR can be reproduced by magnetotransport calculations based on a model of magnetic field dependent disorder induced by spin fluctuation. Thus, the observed LMR in coexistence with superconductivity provides the first magnetotransport signature for spin fluctuation around the superconducting transition region in ultrathin FeSe/STO films.
  • By means of low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy, we report on the electronic structures of BiO and SrO planes of Bi2Sr2CuO6+{\delta} (Bi-2201) superconductor prepared by argon-ion bombardment and annealing. Depending on post annealing conditions, the BiO planes exhibit either pseudogap (PG) with sharp coherence peaks and an anomalously large gap of 49 meV or van Hove singularity (VHS) near the Fermi level, while the SrO is always characteristic of a PG-like feature. This contrasts with Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+{\delta} (Bi-2212) superconductor where VHS occurs solely on the SrO plane. We disclose the interstitial oxygen dopants ({\delta} in the formulas) as a primary cause for the occurrence of VHS, which are located dominantly around the BiO and SrO planes, respectively, in Bi-2201 and Bi-2212. This is supported by the contrasting structural buckling amplitude of BiO and SrO planes in the two superconductors. Our findings provide solid evidence for the irrelevance of PG to the superconductivity in the two superconductors, as well as insights into why Bi-2212 can achieve a higher superconducting transition temperature than Bi-2201, and by implication, the mechanism of cuprate superconductivity.
  • We report on the observation of high-temperature ($T_\textrm{c}$) superconductivity and magnetic vortices in single-unit-cell FeSe films on anatase TiO$_2$(001) substrate by using scanning tunneling microscopy. A systematic study and engineering of interfacial properties has clarified the essential roles of substrate in realizing the high-$T_\textrm{c}$ superconductivity, probably via interface-induced electron-phonon coupling enhancement and charge transfer. By visualizing and tuning the oxygen vacancies at the interface, we find their very limited effect on the superconductivity, which excludes interfacial oxygen vacancies as the primary source for charge transfer between the substrate and FeSe films. Our findings have placed severe constraints on any microscopic model for the high-$T_\textrm{c}$ superconductivity in FeSe-related heterostructures.
  • The pairing mechanism of high-temperature superconductivity in cuprates remains the biggest unresolved mystery in condensed matter physics. To solve the problem, one of the most effective approaches is to investigate directly the superconducting CuO2 layers. Here, by growing CuO2 monolayer films on Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+{\delta} substrates, we identify two distinct and spatially separated energy gaps centered at the Fermi energy, a smaller U-like gap and a larger V-like gap on the films, and study their interactions with alien atoms by low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy. The newly discovered U-like gap exhibits strong phase coherence and is immune to scattering by K, Cs and Ag atoms, suggesting its nature as a nodeless superconducting gap in the CuO2 layers, whereas the V-like gap agrees with the well-known pseudogap state in the underdoped regime. Our results support an s-wave superconductivity in Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+{\delta}, which, we propose, originates from the modulation-doping resultant two-dimensional hole liquid confined in the CuO2 layers.
  • The quantized version of the anomalous Hall effect has been predicted to occur in magnetic topological insulators, but the experimental realization has been challenging. Here, we report the observation of the quantum anomalous Hall (QAH) effect in thin films of Cr-doped (Bi,Sb)2Te3, a magnetic topological insulator. At zero magnetic field, the gate-tuned anomalous Hall resistance reaches the predicted quantized value of h/e^2,accompanied by a considerable drop of the longitudinal resistance. Under a strong magnetic field, the longitudinal resistance vanishes whereas the Hall resistance remains at the quantized value. The realization of the QAH effect may lead to the development of low-power-consumption electronics.
  • We report on the emergence of two disconnected superconducting domes in alkali-metal potassium (K)-doped FeSe ultra-thin films grown on graphitized SiC(0001). The superconductivity exhibits hypersensitivity to K dosage in the lower-Tc dome, whereas in the heavily electron-doped higher-Tc dome it becomes spatially homogeneous and robust against disorder, supportive of a conventional Cooper-pairing mechanism. Furthermore, the heavily K-doped multilayer FeSe films all reveal a large superconducting gap of ~ 14 meV, irrespective of film thickness, verifying the higher-Tc superconductivity only in the topmost FeSe layer. The unusual finding of a double-dome superconducting phase has stepped towards the mechanistic understanding of superconductivity in FeSe-derived superconductors.
  • We study the magnetic response of superconducting $\gamma$-Ga via low temperature scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy. The magnetic vortex cores rely substantially on the Ga geometry, and exhibit an unexpectedly-large axial elongation with aspect ratio up to 40 in rectangular Ga nano-strips (width $l$ $<$ 100 nm). This is in stark contrast with the isotropic circular vortex core in a larger round-shaped Ga island. We suggest that the unusual elongated vortices in Ga nanostrips originate from geometric confinement effect probably via the strong repulsive interaction between the vortices and Meissner screening currents at the sample edge. Our finding provides novel conceptual insights into the geometrical confinement effect on magnetic vortices and forms the basis for the technological applications of superconductors.
  • Interface-enhanced high-temperature superconductivity in one unit-cell (UC) FeSe films on SrTiO3(001) (STO) substrate has recently attracted much attention in condensed matter physics and material science. By combined in-situ scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy (STM/STS) and ex-situ scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) studies, we report on atomically resolved structure including both lattice constants and actual atomic positions of the FeSe/STO interface under both non-superconducting and superconducting states. We observed TiO2 double layers (DLs) and significant atomic displacements in the top two layers of STO, lattice compression of the Se-Fe-Se triple layer, and relative shift between bottom Se and topmost Ti atoms. By imaging the interface structures under various superconducting states, we unveil a close correlation between interface structure and superconductivity. Our atomic-scale identification of FeSe/STO interface structure provides useful information on investigating the pairing mechanism of this interface-enhanced high-temperature superconducting system.
  • Understanding the mechanism of high transition temperature (Tc) superconductivity in cuprates has been hindered by the apparent complexity of their multilayered crystal structure. Using a cryogenic scanning tunneling microscopy, we report on layer-by-layer probing of the electronic structures of all ingredient planes (BiO, SrO, CuO2) of Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+{\delta} superconductor prepared by argon-ion bombardment and annealing technique. We show that the well-known pseudogap (PG) feature observed by STM is inherently a property of the BiO planes and thus irrelevant directly to Cooper pairing. The SrO planes exhibit an unexpected Van Hove singularity near the Fermi level, while the CuO2 planes are exclusively characterized by a smaller gap inside the PG. The small gap becomes invisible near Tc, which we identify as the superconducting gap. The above results constitute severe constraints on any microscopic model for high Tc superconductivity in cuprates.
  • The existence of gapless Dirac surface band of a three dimensional (3D) topological insulator (TI) is guaranteed by the non-trivial topological character of the bulk band, yet the surface band dispersion is mainly determined by the environment near the surface. In this Letter, through in-situ angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) and the first-principles calculation on 3D TI-based van der Waals heterostructures, we demonstrate that one can engineer the surface band structures of 3D TIs by surface modifications without destroying their topological non-trivial property. The result provides an accessible method to independently control the surface and bulk electronic structures of 3D TIs, and sheds lights in designing artificial topological materials for electronic and spintronic purposes.
  • Scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy have been used to investigate the femtosecond dynamics of Dirac fermions in the topological insulator Bi$_2$Se$_3$ ultrathin films. At two-dimensional limit, bulk electrons becomes quantized and the quantization can be controlled by film thickness at single quintuple layer level. By studying the spatial decay of standing waves (quasiparticle interference patterns) off steps, we measure directly the energy and film thickness dependence of phase relaxation length $l_{\phi}$ and inelastic scattering lifetime $\tau$ of topological surface-state electrons. We find that $\tau$ exhibits a remarkable $(E-E_F)^{-2}$ energy dependence and increases with film thickness. We show that the features revealed are typical for electron-electron scattering between surface and bulk states.
  • Molecular beam epitaxy is used to grow TiSe2 ultrathin films on graphitized SiC(0001) substrate. TiSe2films proceed via a nearly layer-by-layer growth mode and exhibit two dominant types of defects, identified as Se vacancy and interstitial, respectively. By means of scanning tunneling microscopy, we demonstrate that the well-established charge density waves can survive in single unit-cell (one triple layer) regime, and find a gradual reduction in their correlation length as the density of surface defects in TiSe2 ultrathin films increases. Our findings offer important insights into the nature of charge density wave in TiSe2, and also pave a material foundation for potential applications based on the collective electronic states.
  • The stoichiometric "111" iron-based superconductor, LiFeAs, has attacted great research interest in recent years. For the first time, we have successfully grown LiFeAs thin film by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) on SrTiO3(001) substrate, and studied the interfacial growth behavior by reflection high energy electron diffraction (RHEED) and low-temperature scanning tunneling microscope (LT-STM). The effects of substrate temperature and Li/Fe flux ratio were investigated. Uniform LiFeAs film as thin as 3 quintuple-layer (QL) is formed. Superconducting gap appears in LiFeAs films thicker than 4 QL at 4.7 K. When the film is thicker than 13 QL, the superconducting gap determined by the distance between coherence peaks is about 7 meV, close to the value of bulk material. The ex situ transport measurement of thick LiFeAs film shows a sharp superconducting transition around 16 K. The upper critical field, Hc2(0)=13.0 T, is estimated from the temperature dependent magnetoresistance. The precise thickness and quality control of LiFeAs film paves the road of growing similar ultrathin iron arsenide films.
  • It is crucial for the studies of the transport properties and quantum effects related to Dirac surface states of three-dimensional topological insulators (3D TIs) to be able to simultaneously tune the chemical potentials of both top and bottom surfaces of a 3D TI thin film. We have realized this in molecular beam epitaxy-grown thin films of 3D TIs, as well as magnetic 3D TIs, by fabricating dual-gate structures on them. The films could be tuned between n-type and p-type by each gate alone. Combined application of two gates can reduce the carrier density of a TI film to a much lower level than with only one of them and enhance the film resistance by 10000 %, implying that Fermi level is tuned very close to the Dirac points of both top and bottom surface states without crossing any bulk band. The result promises applications of 3D TIs in field effect devices.
  • With angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, gap-opening is resolved at up to room temperature in the Dirac surface states of molecular beam epitaxy grown Cr-doped Bi2Se3 topological insulator films, which however show no long-range ferromagnetic order down to 1.5 K. The gap size is found decreasing with increasing electron doping level. Scanning tunneling microscopy and first principles calculations demonstrate that substitutional Cr atoms aggregate into superparamagnetic multimers in Bi2Se3 matrix, which contribute to the observed chemical potential dependent gap-opening in the Dirac surface states without long-range ferromagnetic order.
  • Scanning tunneling spectroscopy has been used to reveal signatures of a bosonic mode in the local quasiparticle density of states of superconducting FeSe films. The mode appears below Tc as a 'dip-hump' feature at energy \Omega ~ 4.7 kBTc beyond the superconducting gap \Delta. Spectra on strained regions of the FeSe films reveal simultaneous decreases in \Delta and \Omega. This contrasts with all previous reports on other high-Tc superconductors, where \Delta locally anti-correlates with \Omega. A local strong coupling model is found to reconcile the discrepancy well, and to provide a unified picture of the electron-boson coupling in unconventional superconductors.
  • We report on conductance fluctuation in quasi-one-dimensional wires made of epitaxial Bi$_{2}$Se$_{3}$ thin film. We found that this type of fluctuation decreases as the wire length becomes longer and that the amplitude of the fluctuation is well scaled to the coherence, thermal diffusion, and wire lengths, as predicted by conventional universal conductance fluctuation (UCF) theory. Additionally, the amplitude of the fluctuation can be understood to be equivalent to the UCF amplitude of a system with strong spin-orbit interaction and no time-reversal symmetry. These results indicate that the conductance fluctuation in Bi$_{2}$Se$_{3}$ wires is explainable through UCF theory. This work is the first to verify the scaling relationship of UCF in a system with strong spin-orbit interaction.
  • Breaking the time-reversal symmetry of a topological insulator (TI) by ferromagnetism can induce exotic magnetoelectric phenomena such as quantized anomalous Hall (QAH) effect. Experimental observation of QAH effect in a magnetically doped TI requires ferromagnetism not relying on the charge carriers. We have realized the ferromagnetism independent of both polarity and density of carriers in Cr-doped BixSb2-xTe3 thin films grown by molecular beam epitaxy. Meanwhile, the anomalous Hall effect is found significantly enhanced with decreasing carrier density, with the anomalous Hall angle reaching unusually large value 0.2 and the zero field Hall resistance reaching one quarter of the quantum resistance (h/e2), indicating the approaching of the QAH regime. The work paves the way to ultimately realize QAH effect and other unique magnetoelectric phenomena in TIs.