• We study the fluctuations of ergodic sums by the means of global and local specifications on periodic points. We obtain Lindeberg-type central limit theorems in both ways. As an application, when the system possesses a unique measure of maximal entropy, we show weak convergence of ergodic sums to a mixture of normal distributions. Our results suggest to decompose the variances of ergodic sums according to global and local sources.
  • Thermal convection in an electrically conducting fluid (for example, a liquid metal) in the presence of a static magnetic field is considered in this chapter. The focus is on the extreme states of the flow, in which both buoyancy and Lorentz forces are very strong. It is argued that the instabilities occurring in such flows are often of unique and counter-intuitive nature due to the action of the magnetic field, which suppresses conventional turbulence and gives preference to two-dimensional instability modes not appearing in more conventional convection systems. Tools of numerical analysis suitable for such flows are discussed.
  • We relate the local specification and periodic shadowing properties. We also clarify the relation between local weak specification and local specification if the system is measure expansive. The notion of strong measure expansiveness is introduced, and an example of a non-expansive systems with the strong measure expansive property is given. Moreover, we find a family of examples with the $N$-expansive property, which are not strong measure expansive. We finally show a spectral decomposition theorem for strong measure expansive dynamical systems with shadowing.
  • The downward flow in a vertical duct with one heated and three thermally insulated walls is analyzed numerically using the two-dimensional approximation valid in the asymptotic limit of an imposed strong transverse magnetic field. The work is motivated by the design of liquid metal blankets with poloidal ducts for future nuclear fusion reactors, in which the main component of the magnetic field is perpendicular to the flow direction and very strong heating is applied at the wall facing the reaction chamber. The flow is found to be steady-state or oscillating depending on the strengths of the heating and magnetic field. A parametric study of the instability leading to the oscillations is performed. It is found among other results that the flow is unstable and develops high-amplitude temperature oscillations at the conditions typical for a fusion reactor blanket.
  • We establish the law of the iterated logarithm for the set of real numbers whose n-th partial quotient is bigger than $\alpha_n$, where $(\alpha_n)$ is a sequence converging to $\infty$.
  • In this paper, we propose a novel method called AlignedReID that extracts a global feature which is jointly learned with local features. Global feature learning benefits greatly from local feature learning, which performs an alignment/matching by calculating the shortest path between two sets of local features, without requiring extra supervision. After the joint learning, we only keep the global feature to compute the similarities between images. Our method achieves rank-1 accuracy of 94.4% on Market1501 and 97.8% on CUHK03, outperforming state-of-the-art methods by a large margin. We also evaluate human-level performance and demonstrate that our method is the first to surpass human-level performance on Market1501 and CUHK03, two widely used Person ReID datasets.
  • Although many methods perform well in single camera tracking, multi-camera tracking remains a challenging problem with less attention. DukeMTMC is a large-scale, well-annotated multi-camera tracking benchmark which makes great progress in this field. This report is dedicated to briefly introduce our method on DukeMTMC and show that simple hierarchical clustering with well-trained person re-identification features can get good results on this dataset.
  • A dynamical array consists of a family of functions $\{f_{n,i}: 1\le i\le k(n), n\ge 1\}$ and a family of initial times $\{\tau_{n,i}: 1\le i\le k(n), n\ge 1\}$. For a dynamical system $(X,T)$ we identify distributional limits for sums of the form $$ S_n= \frac 1{s_n}\sum_{i=1}^{k(n)} [f_{n,i}\circ T^{\tau_{n,i}}-a_{n,i}]\qquad n\ge 1$$ for suitable (non-random) constants $s_n>0$ and $a_{n,i}\in \mathbb R$, where the functions $f_{n,i}$ are locally Lipschitz continuous. Although our results hold for more general dynamics, we restrict to Gibbs-Markov dynamical systems for convenience. In particular, we derive a Lindeberg-type central limit theorem for dynamical arrays. Applications include new central limit theorems for functions which are not locally Lipschitz continuous and central limit theorems for statistical functions of time series obtained from Gibbs-Markov systems.
  • Variance-based logic (VBL) uses the fluctuations or the variance in the state of a particle or a physical quantity to represent different logic levels. In this letter we show that compared to the traditional bi-stable logic representation the variance-based representation can theoretically achieve a superior performance trade-off (in terms of energy dissipation and information capacity) when operating at fundamental limits imposed by thermal-noise. We show that for a bi-stable logic device the lower limit on energy dissipated per bit is 4.35KT/bit, whereas under similar operating conditions, a VBL device could achieve a lower limit of sub-KT/bit. These theoretical results are general enough to be applicable to different instantiations and variants of VBL ranging from digital processors based on energy-scavenging or to processors based on the emerging valleytronic devices.
  • Geothermal Heat Pump (GHP) systems are heating and cooling systems that use the ground as the temperature exchange medium. GHP systems are becoming more and more popular in recent years due to their high efficiency. Conventional control schemes of GHP systems are mainly designed for buildings with a single thermal zone. For large buildings with multiple thermal zones, those control schemes either lose efficiency or become costly to implement requiring a lot of real-time measurement, communication and computation. In this paper, we focus on developing energy efficient control schemes for GHP systems in buildings with multiple zones. We present a thermal dynamic model of a building equipped with a GHP system for floor heating/cooling and formulate the GHP system control problem as a resource allocation problem with the objective to maximize user comfort in different zones and to minimize the building energy consumption. We then propose real-time distributed algorithms to solve the control problem. Our distributed multi-zone control algorithms are scalable and do not need to measure or predict any exogenous disturbances such as the outdoor temperature and indoor heat gains. Thus, it is easy to implement them in practice. Simulation results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed control schemes.
  • In this paper, we design real-time decentralized and distributed control schemes for Heating Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC) systems in energy efficient buildings. The control schemes balance user comfort and energy saving, and are implemented without measuring or predicting exogenous disturbances. Firstly, we introduce a thermal dynamic model of building systems and formulate a steady-state resource allocation problem, which aims to minimize the aggregate deviation between zone temperatures and their set points, as well as the building energy consumption, subject to practical operating constraints, by adjusting zone flow rates. Because this problem is nonconvex, we propose two methods to (approximately) solve it and to design the real-time control. In the first method, we present a convex relaxation approach to solve an approximate version of the steady-state optimization problem, where the heat transfer between neighboring zones is ignored. We prove the tightness of the relaxation and develop a real-time decentralized algorithm to regulate the zone flow rate. In the second method, we introduce a mild assumption under which the original optimization problem becomes convex, and then a real-time distributed algorithm is developed to regulate the zone flow rate. In both cases, the thermal dynamics can be driven to equilibria which are optimal solutions to those associated steady-state optimization problems. Finally, numerical examples are provided to illustrate the effectiveness of the designed control schemes.
  • Inverse spin Hall effect (ISHE) in ferromagnetic metals (FM) can also be used to detect the spin current generated by longitudinal spin Seebeck effect in a ferromagnetic insulator YIG. However, anomalous Nernst effect(ANE) in FM itself always mixes in the thermal voltage. In this work, the exchange bias structure (NiFe/IrMn)is employed to separate these two effects. The exchange bias structure provides a shift field to NiFe, which can separate the magnetization of NiFe from that of YIG in M-H loops. As a result, the ISHE related to magnetization of YIG and the ANE related to the magnetization of NiFe can be separated as well. By comparison with Pt, a relative spin Hall angle of NiFe (0.87) is obtained, which results from the partially filled 3d orbits and the ferromagnetic order. This work puts forward a practical method to use the ISHE in ferromagnetic metals towards future spintronic applications.
  • In this paper, we address energy management for heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems in buildings, and present a novel combined optimization and control approach. We first formulate a thermal dynamics and an associated optimization problem. An optimization dynamics is then designed based on a standard primal-dual algorithm, and its strict passivity is proved. We then design a local controller and prove that the physical dynamics with the controller is ensured to be passivity-short. Based on these passivity results, we interconnect the optimization and physical dynamics, and prove convergence of the room temperatures to the optimal ones defined for unmeasurable disturbances. Finally, we demonstrate the present algorithms through simulation.
  • Previous studies showed that CsI(Na) crystals have significantly different waveforms between alpha and gamma scintillations. In this work, the light yield and PSD capability of CsI(Na) scintillators as a function of the temperature down to 80 K has been studied. As temperature drops, the fast component rises and the slow component decreases. By cooling the CsI(Na) crystals, the light yield of high ionization events are enhanced significantly, while the light yield of background gamma events are suppressed. At 110 K, CsI(Na) crystal achieves the optimal balance between low threshold and good background rejection performance. The different responses of CsI(Na) to gamma and alpha at different temperatures are explained with self-trapped and activator luminescence centers.
  • Magnetoelectric coupling in ferromagnet/multiferroic systems is often manifested in the exchange bias effect, which may have combined contributions from multiple sources, such as domain walls, chemical defects or strain. In this study we magnetically "fingerprint" the coupling behavior of CoFe grown on epitaxial BiFeO3 (BFO) thin films by magnetometry and first-order-reversal-curves (FORC). The contribution to exchange bias from 71{\deg}, 109{\deg} and charged ferroelectric domain walls (DWs) was elucidated by the FORC distribution. CoFe samples grown on BFO with 71{\deg} DWs only exhibit an enhancement of the coercivity, but little exchange bias. Samples grown on BFO with 109{\deg} DWs and mosaic DWs exhibit a much larger exchange bias, with the main enhancement attributed to 109{\deg} and charged DWs. Based on the Malozemoff random field model, a varying-anisotropy model is proposed to account for the exchange bias enhancement. This work sheds light on the relationship between the exchange bias effect of the CoFe/BFO heterointerface and the ferroelectric DWs, and provides a path for multiferroic device analysis and design.
  • The liquid scintillator (LS) has been widely utilized in the past, running and future neutrino experiments, and requirement to the LS radio-purity is higher and higher. The water extraction is a powerful method to remove soluble radioactive nuclei, and a mini-extraction station has been constructed. To evaluate the extraction efficiency and optimize the operation parameters, a setup to load radioactivity to LS and a laboratory scale setup to measure radioactivity which use Bi^{212}-Po^{212}-Pb^{208} cascade decay are developed. Experiences from laboratory study will be useful to large scale water extraction plants design and the optimization of working in future.
  • In this note we discuss limit distribution of normalized return times for shrinking targets and draw a necessary and sufficient condition using sweep-out sequence in order for the limit distribution to be exponential with parameter $1$. The normalizing coefficients are the same as sizes of the targets. Moreover we study escape rate, namely the exponential decay rate of sweep-out sequence and prove that in $\psi$-mixing systems for a certain class of sets the escape rate is in limit proportional to the size of the set.
  • Forward imaging technique is the base of combined method on density reconstruction with the forward calculation and inverse problem solution. In the paper, we introduced the projection equation for the radiographic system with areal source blur and detector blur, gained the projecting matrix from any point source to any detector pixel with x-ray trace technique, proposed the ideal on gridding the areal source as many point sources with different weights, and used the blurring window as the effect of the detector blur. We used the forward projection equation to gain the same deviation information about the object edge as the experimental image. Our forward projection equation is combined with Constrained Conjugate Gradient method to form a new method for density reconstruction, XTRACE-CCG. The new method worked on the simulated image of French Test Object and experimental image. The same results have been concluded the affecting range of the blur is decreased and can be controlled to one or two pixels. The method is also suitable for reconstruction of density-variant object. The capability of our method to handle blur effect is useful for all radiographic systems with larger source size comparing to pixel size.
  • Liquid scintillator (LS) will be adopted as the detector material in JUNO (Jiangmen Underground Neutrino Observatory). The energy resolution requirement of JUNO is 3%, which has never previously been reached. To achieve this energy resolution, the light yield of liquid scintillator is an important factor. PPO (the fluor) and bis-MSB (the wavelength shifter) are the two main materials dissolved in LAB. To study the influence of these two materials on the transmission of scintillation photons in LS, 25 and 12 cm-long quartz vessels were used in a light yield experiment. LS samples with different concentration of PPO and bis-MSB were tested. At these lengths, the light yield growth is not obvious when the concentration of PPO is higher than 4 g/L. The influence from bis-MSB becomes insignificant when its concentration is higher than 8 mg/L. This result could provide some useful suggestions for the JUNO LS.
  • We has set up a light scattering spectrometer to study the depolarization of light scattering in linear alkylbenzene. From the scattering spectra it can be unambiguously shown that the depolarized part of light scattering belongs to Rayleigh scattering. The additional depolarized Rayleigh scattering can make the effective transparency of linear alkylbenzene much better than it was expected. Therefore sufficient scintillation photons can transmit through the large liquid scintillator detector of JUNO. Our study is crucial to achieving the unprecedented energy resolution 3\%/$\sqrt{E\mathrm{(MeV)}}$ for JUNO experiment to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy. The spectroscopic method can also be used to judge the attribution of the depolarization of other organic solvents used in neutrino experiments.
  • In this work, we study the response of single layer Thick GEM (THGEM) detector to p/${\pi^+}$ at E3 line of Beijing Test Beam Facility. In our experiment, the drift gap of THGEM Detector is 4mm, and the working gas is Ar/3% iso. Result shows at the momentum 500MeV/c to 1000MeV/c, detection efficiency for p is from 93% to 99% in a relatively lower gain($\sim$2000), while the detection efficiency for ${\pi^+}$ is slightly lower than that for p, which is from 82% to 88%. Meanwhile, simple Geant4 simulations have been done, and results of beam test are almost consistent with it. We preliminarily study the feasibility of THGEM detectors as sampling elements for Digital Hadronic Calorimeter(DHCAL), which may provide related reference for THGEM possibly applied in Circular Electron Positron Collider(CEPC) HCAL.
  • High-purity germanium detectors are well suited to analysis the radioactivity of samples. In order to reduce the environmental background, low-activity lead and oxygen free copper are installed outside of the probe to shield gammas, outmost is a plastic scintillator to veto the cosmic rays, and an anti-Compton detector can improve the Peak-to-Compton ratio. Using the GEANT4 tools and taking into account a detailed description of the detector, we optimize the sizes of the detectors to reach the design indexes. A group of experimental data from a HPGe spectrometer in using were used to compare with the simulation. As to new HPGe Detector simulation, considering the different thickness of BGO crystals and anti-coincidence efficiency, the simulation results show that the optimal thickness is 5.5cm, and the Peak-to-Compton ratio of 40K is raised to 1000 when the anti-coincidence efficiency is 0.85. As the background simulation, 15 cm oxygen-free copper plus 10 cm lead can reduce the environmental gamma rays to 0.0024 cps/100 cm3 Ge (50keV~2.8MeV), which is about 10-5 of environmental background.
  • Stainless steel is the material used for the storage vessels and piping systems of LAB-based liquid scintillator in JUNO experiment. Aging is recognized as one of the main degradation mechanisms affecting the properties of liquid scintillator. LAB-based liquid scintillator aging experiments were carried out in different material of containers (type 316 and 304 stainless steel and glass) at two different temperature (40 and 25 degrees Celsius). For the continuous liquid scintillator properties tests, the light yield and the absorption spectrum are nearly the same as that of the unaged one. The attenuation length of the aged samples is 6%~12% shorter than that of the unaged one. But the concentration of element Fe in the LAB-based liquid scintillator does not show a clear change. So the self aging has small effect on liquid scintillator, as well as the stainless steel impurity quenching. Type 316 and 304 stainless steel can be used as LAB-based liquid scintillator vessel, transportation pipeline material.