• The magnetic interaction between rare-earth and Fe ions in hexagonal rare-earth ferrites (h-REFeO3), may amplify the weak ferromagnetic moment on Fe, making these materials more appealing as multiferroics. To elucidate the interaction strength between the rare-earth and Fe ions as well as the magnetic moment of the rare-earth ions, element specific magnetic characterization is needed. Using X-ray magnetic circular dichroism, we have studied the ferrimagnetism in h-YbFeO3 by measuring the magnetization of Fe and Yb separately. The results directly show anti-alignment of magnetization of Yb and Fe ions in h-YbFeO3 at low temperature, with an exchange field on Yb of about 17 kOe. The magnetic moment of Yb is about 1.6 \muB at low-temperature, significantly reduced compared with the 4.5 \muB moment of a free Yb3+. In addition, the saturation magnetization of Fe in h-YbFeO3 has a sizable enhancement compared with that in h-LuFeO3. These findings directly demonstrate that ferrimagnetic order exists in h-YbFeO3; they also account for the enhancement of magnetization and the reduction of coercivity in h-YbFeO3 compared with those in h-LuFeO3 at low temperature, suggesting an important role for the rare-earth ions in tuning the multiferroic properties of h-REFeO3.
  • Elastic strain is potentially an important approach in tuning the properties of the improperly multiferroic hexagonal ferrites, the details of which have however been elusive due to the experimental difficulties. Employing the method of restrained thermal expansion, we have studied the effect of isothermal biaxial strain in the basal plane of h-LuFeO3 (001) films. The results indicate that a compressive biaxial strain significantly enhances the ferrodistortion, and the effect is larger at higher temperatures. The compressive biaxial strain and the enhanced ferrodistortion together, cause an increase in the electric polarization and a reduction in the canting of the weak ferromagnetic moments in h-LuFeO3, according to our first principle calculations. These findings are important for understanding the strain effect as well as the coupling between the lattice and the improper multiferroicity in h-LuFeO3. The experimental elucidation of the strain effect in h-LuFeO3 films also suggests that the restrained thermal expansion can be a viable method to unravel the strain effect in many other epitaxial thin film materials.
  • Ferroelectricity at room temperature has been demonstrated in nanometer-thin quasi 2D croconic acid thin films, by the polarization hysteresis loop measurements in macroscopic capacitor geometry, along with observation and manipulation of the nanoscale domain structure by piezoresponse force microscopy. The fabrication of continuous thin films of the hydrogen-bonded croconic acid was achieved by the suppression of the thermal decomposition using low evaporation temperatures in high vacuum, combined with growth conditions far from thermal equilibrium. For nominal coverages >=20 nm, quasi 2D and polycrystalline films, with an average grain size of 50-100 nm and 3.5 nm roughness, can be obtained. Spontaneous ferroelectric domain structures of the thin films have been observed and appear to correlate with the grain patterns. The application of this solvent-free growth protocol may be a key to the development of flexible organic ferroelectric thin films for electronic applications.
  • Electronic structures for the conduction bands of both hexagonal and orthorhombic LuFeO3 thin films have been measured using x-ray absorption spectroscopy at oxygen K (O K) edge. Dramatic differences in both the spectra shape and the linear dichroism are observed. These differences in the spectra can be explained using the differences in crystal field splitting of the metal (Fe and Lu) electronic states and the differences in O 2p-Fe 3d and O 2p-Lu 5d hybridizations. While the oxidation states has not changed, the spectra are sensitive to the changes in the local environments of the Fe3+ and Lu3+ sites in the hexagonal and orthorhombic structures. Using the crystal-field splitting and the hybridizations that are extracted from the measured electronic structures and the structural distortion information, we derived the occupancies of the spin minority states in Fe3+, which are non-zero and uneven. The single ion anisotropy on Fe3+ sites is found to originate from these uneven occupancies of the spin minority states via spin-orbit coupling in LuFeO3.
  • The crystal and magnetic structures of single-crystalline hexagonal LuFeO$_3$ films have been studied using x-ray, electron and neutron diffraction methods. The polar structure of these films are found to persist up to 1050 K; and the switchability of the polar behavior is observed at room temperature, indicating ferroelectricity. An antiferromagnetic order was shown to occur below 440 K, followed by a spin reorientation resulting in a weak ferromagnetic order below 130 K. This observation of coexisting multiple ferroic orders demonstrates that hexagonal LuFeO$_3$ films are room-temperature multiferroics.
  • Hexagonal LuFeO$_3$ films have been studied using x-ray absorption and optical spectroscopy. The crystal splittings of Fe$^{3+}$ are extracted as $E_{e'}-E_{e"}$=0.7 eV and $E_{a_1'}-E_{e'}$=0.9 eV and a 2.0 eV optical band gap is determined assuming a direct gap. First-principles calculations confirm the experiments that the relative energies of crystal field splitting states do follow $E_{a_1'}>E_{e'}>E_{e"}$ with slightly underestimated values and a band gap of 1.35 eV.
  • A growth diagram of Lu-Fe-O compounds on MgO (111) substrates using pulsed laser deposition is constructed based on extensive growth experiments. The LuFe$_2$O$_4$ phase can only be grown in a small range of temperature and O$_2$ pressure conditions. An understanding of the growth mechanism of Lu-Fe-O compound films is offered in terms of the thermochemistry at the surface. Superparamagnetism is observed in LuFe$_2$O$_4$ film and is explained in terms of the effect of the impurity h-LuFeO$_3$ phase and structural defects .